DCSIMG

Environmental Assessment Office

Collected Public Comments for Burnco Aggregate Project

August 15, 2016 to October 3, 2016

Comments will be available on this page until October 17, 2016 and after this date all posted comments will be available through the EAO electronic Project Information Centre (ePIC) application.

October 3, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

public comment submissionpublic comment submissionpublic comment submission

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

3rd October, 2016
BC Environmental Assessment Office
PO Box 9426 Stn Prov Govt
Victoria, BC V8W 9V1

RE: Key concerns regarding BURNCO Aggregate Mine Project

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on proposed BURNCO Aggregate Mine Project, proposed at McNab Creek in Howe Sound. While I have had very limited time to adequately review this proposal within the short timeframe permitted by the BC EAO/CEAA, I have outlined a few of my key concerns follows:

1) Estuaries are an irreplaceable natural resource.

Estuaries deliver invaluable ecosystem services, as well as providing economic, cultural, and ecological benefits to communities.

Estuaries and wetlands are one of the ecosystems most threatened by development, however they trap (sequester) more carbon than rainforests. Both seagrasses and salt marsh grasses are incredibly productive carbon sinks, as the carbon they use to make their leaves are incorporated into the layers of sediment every year. Estuaries worldwide sequester up to 100 teragrams of carbon per year. Saltmarshes sequester up to 24 tonnes of carbon per hectare per year.

Estuaries and wetlands also help to make our water cleaner, as they act like a giant liver that filters and traps pollutants such as herbicides, pesticides, and heavy metals, as well as sediments and nutrients. They are hotspots for biodiversity, and are vital as habitat for migrating birds, and nurseries for juvenile fish. They stabilize shorelines, minimize erosion, and protect coastal areas from floods and storm surges, acting like a sponge and soaking up the excess floodwater.

Vegetated coastal habitats such as seagrasses and saltmarsh habitat rank amongst the most threatened marine ecosystems. About 25% of the area originally covered by salt-marshes has been globally lost due to development, with current loss rates at about 1 to 2% per year.

A 2009 report by United Nations Environment Programme entitled, Blue Carbon, notes that:

"Maintaining or improving the ability of forests and oceans to absorb and bury CO2 is a crucial aspect of climate change mitigation," and;

"The loss of these carbon sinks, and their crucial role in managing climate, health, food security and economic development in the coastal zones, is therefore an imminent threat."

McNab Creek is the second-largest estuary in Howe Sound, one of only three estuaries located in this southern-most fjord. It deserves to be protected.

QUESTIONS: Given the proximity of alternative, undeveloped gravel resources, why should this gravel mine be permitted in such a vitally important and sensitive ecosystem? How does the proponent propose to adequately compensate for the loss of the invaluable ecosystem services outlined above? How does the proponent propose to adequately compensate for the loss of the McNab Creek estuary as a carbon sink?

SOURCES:

Bridgham, S.D., J.P. Megonigal, J.K. Keller, N.B. Bliss, and C. Trettin. 2006. The carbon balance of North American wetlands. Wetlands 26: 889–916.

Cebrian, J. and C. M. Duarte. 1996. Plant growth-rate dependence of detrital carbon storage in ecosystems. Science 268: 1606-1608.

Duarte, C.M., W.C. Dennison, R.J.W. Orth and T.J.B. Carruthers. 2008. The charisma of coastal ecosystems: addressing the imbalance"- Estuaries and Coasts 31:233–238.

Duarte, C.M., M. Holmer, Y. Olsen, D. Soto, N. Marbà, J. Guiu, K. Black and I. Karakassis. 2009. Will the Oceans Help Feed Humanity? BioScience 59 (11): 967–976.

Nellemann, C., Corcoran, E., Duarte, C. M., Valdés, L., De Young, C., Fonseca, L., Grimsditch, G. (Eds). 2009. Blue Carbon. A Rapid Response Assessment. United Nations Environment Programme

NOAA (2016) Why Are Estuaries Important? Ecosystem Services. Retrieved from http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/education/kits/estuaries/estuaries03_ecosystem.html

2) Loss of channel complexity and sediment replenishment

The proponent proposes to build a dike along the northern and eastern edge of the gravel extraction area which will permanently restrict the flow of McNab Creek. While it appears that the current channel hasn't changed in quite some time, the restriction of creeks/rivers limits channel complexity by restricting the powerful currents that would typically shape the watercourse and surrounding floodplain. These changes to how creeks/rivers flow results in the loss of the complex network of side channels, sloughs, alcoves, ponds, and wetlands, as well as a loss of floodplain forest. These diverse and dynamic habitats are very important for salmon, beavers, river otters, and birds, and other fauna.

These dikes will isolate McNab Creek from its natural fan delta, restricting sediment replenishment in the western part of the estuary. This in turn will likely increase the risk of erosion of the shoreline and tidal flat, resulting in loss of diverse habitats.

Water flowing beneath creeks/rivers periodically resurfaces to create coldwater refuges for temperature-sensitive fish like salmon and trout. These coldwater refuges are vital, especially given the current and future impacts of climate change on these iconic west-coast species.

Question 3.1: What mitigation is proposed to offset the loss of natural river-mouth migration, and the loss of sediment deposition and natural aggradation across the western side of the estuary?

QUESTIONS: How will the proponent offset the loss of sediment deposition on the western part of the estuary? How does the proponent propose to adequately compensate for the loss of channel complexity and diverse habitats vital to salmon and other species as outlined above?

SOURCES:

Hulse, D. & Gregory, S. (2004) Integrating resilience into floodplain restoration. Urban Ecosystems 7: 295.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

A) Estuaries Not a Location for Large Industrial Plants

As a (past) member of the Squamish Estuary Management Committee (SEMC), representing Environment Canada, we recognized the significant ecological importance of estuarine ecosystems. The Committee's work led to a series of management plans and the current Wildlife Management Area (WMA) to help address the very significant past impacts of chemical contamination and habitat destruction in the Squamish Estuary. I often wondered, "if only early decision-makers had known about the ecological importance of estuaries, and that estuaries are not the location to build a large industrial plants."

Now, in 2016, decision-makers are faced with the same question, whether to build a large industrial plant in Howe Sound's second largest estuary, after the Squamish. However, in 2016 decision-makers know, or ought to know that natural estuaries provide many irreplaceable ecological services and are unsuitable for large industrial plants like the proposed project at McNab Creek.

Environmental assessment professionals recognize that at its core, environmental reviews are an assessment of alternatives. In this case the proponent and agencies need to better consider alternative locations, since an estuary like McNab Creek is not the right location.

B) Professional Science and Engineering Signoff

The EAO and CEAA websites seldom provide review details or the analysis undertaken by individual government scientists and engineers. Usually, websites provide larger, carefully written reports that do not attribute analysis.

Furthermore, formal agencies' correspondence or reports, provide little or no information on the professional qualifications of those government scientists and engineers taking professional responsibility for the science and engineering elements in the review. In its early days, the EAO was much more transparent and published almost all internal government analysis on reviews.

Accordingly, it is now difficult for the public to determine whether the review analysis was undertaken by a suitably qualified professional, or by others. The public credibility of EA reviews has suffered tremendously, with the perception and sometimes of the reality of government making decisions in the absence of sound science advice.

Therefore, government reviewing agencies need to explicitly list the professional qualifications and affiliations of their reviewers and the topics they reviewed. This is particularly important for engineering or geosciences issues where the "BC Engineers and Geoscientists Act", requires that work that falls within the Act be undertaken or directly supervised by a suitably professional engineer or geoscientist. The Professional Engineer or Geoscientist also needs to sign-off or seal documents for which they take professional responsibility. In the past, the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of BC has written to the EAO in this regard.

Similarly, government agencies need to have suitably qualified Registered Professional Biologists sign-off on many ecological issues – such as whether or not an estuary is a suitable location for an industrial plant.

Lynn Chapman - Roberts Creek, British Columbia

I am writing in opposition to the Burnco Mine Project on the basis that it will cause harm to McNab Creek and the McNab Creek estuary which cannot be mitigated. There is no justification, save private interest by the proponents, for re-industrializing Howe Sound now that it is finally returning to life sustaining capacity. I am not a biologist or an expert but I have seen the biodiversity that the estuary currently supports and I also know there are only two such estuaries in Howe Sound. if that rare and fragile ecosystem is destroyed it will harm the recovery of the whole of Howe Sound. That is not in the Public's interest.

The new science around the excavation and removal of vast amounts of sand and gravel needs to be reviewed and considered. Unfortunately, the lack of quality, depth and breadth of focus of the current Environmental Assessment process cannot be trusted to actually protect biodiversity and ecosystem integrity over the short term interests of business. Notwithstanding that I urge you sincerely to protect McNab Creek, its estuary and the recovering lands above it and to reject the Burnco Application.

Personal Information Withheld - Gibsons, British Columbia

The following from Associates to Burnco Aggregate Project.

Why was this report relying on old information from 2005 and beyond? The geological hazards in the McNab area are significant as this report shows. An "assessment comprising a desktop review of existing information" is not acceptable, especially knowing the fact that this projectGolder is in the Cascadia Subduction earthquake zone.

(5.4.4 Baseline Conditions) "The natural hazards baseline conditions was completed by conducting a terrain and terrain stability mapping assessment comprising a desktop review of existing information, production of a terrain base map, and analysis of the potential for the terrain hazards to affect the Proposed Project facilities".

(5.4.4.5 Discussion)
"avalanching and steep valley sidewall debris and rock slides are common in the McNab Creek watershed, they are not expected to directly affect the LSA. Activities associated with the Proposed Project Area are not anticipated

to increase the potential for initiating mass wasting (i.e., landslide) events. How was this determined?

Landslides and snow avalanches can transport debris and sediment to creeks, increase water volumes, increase fine sediment transport, and in some cases debris jams can cause outburst floods (as seen with debris flood events). Evidence for significant debris flows and debris floods (including outburst floods) was not identified in this desktop assessment".

Current geological data would be critical for making sound sensible decisions on outcomes for this area.

At the end of production, a huge water filled pit remains, with man made silt berms to the North and one to the South, just one good avalanche, or an extreme winter rainstorm could push through the berm and take out the whole pit. This would ruin the McNab estuary for many years.

Could we experience another Mount Polley? or a failed Bafokeng Dam?

"The report, which was released on Friday morning in Victoria, said the design failed to take into account the complexity of the instability of underlying glacial and pre-glacial layers under the retaining wall".

This is a project that could become a huge environmental disaster, something we do not need!

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

To save you the effort of reading lots of prose:

Howe Sound is finally recovering after decades of industry and the contamination left behind by these industries. Herring and Whales are returning in record numbers. We must put long term protection of Howe Sound at the top of priorities in the region. It will have significantly more economic benefits through fisheries and tourism.

If industry were made to pay the true costs of their pollution and also cleanup their mess after their operations come to an end, then they likely wouldn't be economically viable.

Gravel is not is short supply - there is no need for a new mine to satisfy needs.

This project has already been rejected by Fisheries & Oceans because of the likely loss of salmon habitat - I don't understand the system - it seems that companies just keep resubmitting until they finally get approval. Rejections are for valid reasons and they shouldn't be easily overturned by successive tweaks.

Increased marine traffic - it seems that the environmental approval process doesn't consider the combined impacts of all proposed projects - if you add the barges from this project to the LNG tankers for the proposed Woodfibre LNG project, we are adding a lot of traffic. Noise from these will affect whales and generally dimish the natural environment. We have the wonderful new Sea to Sky Marine Trail which is bringing more kayakers to the area. These large vessels will decrease the experience for these tourists.

I know that people will be arguing the lack of jobs for this project and I agree, but to honest I don't understand why this should even be a consideration for an environmental assessment - it's a bad project for the environment - it shouldn't matter with there are significant jobs or not.

Noise, air quality, dust in the vicinity of a residential area - this isn't fair to the local residents.

Howe Sound is such a magical area that has so much aethestic value along with the value of its ecosystem services. Can you imagine if other iconic locations around the world such as Yosemite Valley, Milford Sound, the Grand Canyon, Yellowstone, etc etc were not protected and allowed industries? I don't think people realize that Howe Sound really is just as special as all of these places and should be protected!

Trish Thompson - Port Mellon, British Columbia

Estuaries are set up to save the natural habitat of areas and now you want to let folks make a gravel pit in an estuary, this is just pure craziness and borderline insanity, please do not allow a gravel pit in our McNab Creek Estuary.

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

Please add the following to the Burnco submissions, the deadline for submissions is October 3, 2016. It is currently 11:20 pm on October 3, 2016 and the form for submissions is not available on the website.

This is a serious piece of information regarding the environment at McNab Creek.

Lady and gentlemen of Burnco.

The pic attached was taken yesterday at McNab.

In this message please know that I am one of a significant group of citizens who live in Lions Bay, Howe Sound. We also, because of where we live, enjoy Howe Sound. Every summer, all summer, we take our families over to McNab Creek and enjoy this pristine area. It's not just us though, it's many people who live in what we all refer to as the Sea to Sky Corridor.

You would too if you lived here. You would also take your kids here, your kid's kids, and then they would begin the same cycle. The same, very positive cycle, of caring for this planet. Especially the places like McNab Creek.

Because of where you live, I can't expect you to really understand this.

When I read through all of your corporate history, one point stands out quite clearly. You care a lot about your family history.

Well we all do too. And you would if you lived here, and experienced what we all do.

No matter what you believe based on your studies, you will do harm to this area. I am saying you, because although you all work for a company, you directly are making this decision to try to bring your company's plant here.

Please go back to your families and look at your kids and grandkids and then quietly ask yourselves, would they understand your decision if you had been taking them to this special place since they were old enough to remember it, and your helped to degrade it?

You all know what the answer is.

Please, think about what you are doing in this context, not just about how much money you will make.

Janine MacLeod - Vancouver, British Columbia

I do not believe that the proposed Burnco Aggregate Project constitutes an appropriate development for the McNab Creek Site.

First, the project would compromise the second largest estuary in Howe Sound. These environments are some of the richest parts of the shoreline in terms of sheer density of life. As someone who experiences a great deal of hope and comfort in connection with recent signs of ecological recovery in Howe Sound, I would be devastated to see such a critical marine habitat disturbed by the mine. Vibrations will interfere with the reproduction, food finding and navigational activities of marine life such as orcas and dolphins, who have just begin returning to this area.

Secondly, the mine would essentially block the movement of wildlife between the upper parts of the valley and the estuary, eliminating this important corridor between the estuary and the uplands. I am very concerned about this displacement of wildlife. Burnco's own consultants identified 23 species at risk that would be threatened by the mine.

Finally, I am concerned about the cumulative impacts of the proposed aggregate project, run of river projects in the area, and logging. How many stresses from human extractive activity should that valley be expected to handle?

Personal Information Withheld - Gambier Island, British Columbia

60 odd yrs on Gambier have watched the rape & foul pollution of Howe sound & its watersheds.the discharge from Port Mellon pulp mill fouled the water so much visibility was limited to a few inches.How,in this day and age can we allow any more of this carnage,the mere fact that it has to be debated is a disgrace to anyone who remotely cares about the natural world that's being killed around us. Please prove that greed and money doesn't always win!

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

This project carries too much risk for McNab Creek and Howe Sound and will negatively impact the resurgence of marine life, ecotourism and recreation which are all part of the sustainable use of the area. Please do not approve this plan.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

I am writing to say I am against the Bunco Aggregate Project at McNab Creek. As a retired marine biologist, this is an extremely damaging proposal to the estuary environment. The Department of Fisheries and Oceans have turned this project down for serious consequences to fish and fish habitat. The estuary is a vital and essential habitat for the transition of species between the marine and fresh water ecosystem. This places need to be protected.

Bill Anderson - Gibsons, British Columbia

To have machinery digging in the riparian area of McNab Creek and valley is definitely wrong, as these areas are extremely sensitive to disturbances. Even modest changes in the amount and timing of water flow may result in significant changes to the physical and biological functioning of these ecosystems.

Work in the area would interfere with natural flood cycles that are critical to healthy riparian zones. Floods bring essential supplies of water, nutrients and sediment. They also help to create backwater that serve as critical fish nurseries.

The McNab Creek riparian area and estuary is critical to a healthy marine environment. Please do not allow any industrialization of this sensitive area.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

The proposed gravel mine at McNab Creek, along with the recently approved LNG project at Woodfibre, and with other proposed, current, and past developments in Howe Sound have had, and will continue to have a number of significant direct and cumulative environmental effects to Howe Sound.

As a resident living at the mouth of Howe Sound, I have seen Howe Sound slowly recover from the environmental impacts of past industrialization. For example, a few weeks ago my six year old grandson and I saw four Orca's close to Hutt Island. There also have been several sightings of humpback whales in our areas. Some fisheries are also making a comeback. This is a sign of slow recovery, since such events were a very uncommon in the past century that marked the height of environmental destruction in Howe Sound.

The proposed gravel mine represents a significant threat to the recovery of Howe Sound. Furthermore, in recent years there has been significant loss in the science-based capabilities of provincial and federal environmental agencies, that threatens the credibility of environmental reviews.

Accordingly, the project must not be considered, approved or constructed until:
1) Howe Sound's environmental recovery is complete and the project is reassessed at that time, and
2) Decision-making agencies clearly demonstrate that their decisions are based on the recommendations of qualified professional scientists and engineers with specialized environmental knowledge.

Joan Mc Cullough - Lions Bay, British Columbia

Here we go again for the third time. When will Burnco and the Eao finally stop contemplating that this project would even be a possibility in Howe Sound. You have seen and heard all the comments from very qualified environmentalists and residents here. Over 99% according to our math are against this disgusting project FOR THE 3RD TIME.

When are you going to realise that the Residents and Friends of Howe Sound will not allow this project to go ahead.

There is no shortage of gravel and according to our local gravel suppliers in Squamish and North Vancouver there is no reason to destroy our environment and flood the market.

If Alberta wants more gravel, they can dig up in Alberta, not here in Howe Sound..

99% of respondents have voiced their opinion AGAINST this project,YES 99%

Therefore you have no social licence to say yes to this project. All local press comments are against this project. I cannot imagine what the fall-out will be if you say yes. No matter what you decide, our local citizens will make sure it will not go ahead. This affront on our fishing and wild life habitat will not be allowed

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

I am against the Burnco gravel pit mine as over the last few years we have seen an amazing increase in the amazing wildlife in this area, whales, porpoise and more. A clear indication that we are moving in the right direction to ensure marine biology has the environment that they need to thrive. The environmental impact on land, bird and marine wildlife with the introduction of this project, i believe will have substantial and irreparable environmental damage to the creek and its fish and foreshore habitat. There will be increased barge traffic in the sound and significant noise pollution which won't only impact boaters and residents, but also marine life. I trust that you will listen to the pleas of those that live and frequent this area, and the effects on the environment if this project should move forward. We only have one earth, we must treat it with respect.

Personal Information Withheld - Maple Ridge, British Columbia

No information or a vote to the Squamish nation membership on or off reserve. Getting the signatures of a few elected does not equate consensus.

Chris Dietrich - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Hello,

I just wanted to voice my concern about the gravel mine that Burnco has proposed to put in beautiful Howe Sound. Howe Sound has inspired me in so many ways. It has been my childhood escape where I could just be a kid, playing with my friends in the forest or enjoying paddle boarding, kayaking and fishing of the dock in the early morning.

I was so inspired in fact, that I made many movies there, capturing the glorious scenery. Little did I know that there were other people interested in the Howe Sound, and it was not people who necessarily aiming to make things better for the community in the area. When I heard about the mine, I was appalled and scared about the future of the community, the peacefulness, the spectacular scenery, and of course the wildlife.

I decided to get my camera out once again and create a short 5 minute video, giving awareness about the multitude of recreational activities and the nature within this region along with the increasingly-real threat that looms over it. I also knew that there were mines there before. Britannia Mine being one of the biggest polluters in Canada, harmed the Howe Sound immensely. Only recently have the prawns, crab, salmon, orcas and dolphins come back. We do not want to make that same environmental mistake twice in such a fragile ecosystem…and that was the drive for my video. Next summer I'm planning a more professional documentary on the history, threats and sustainability of Howe Sound.

That video published back in 2013 totally changed what I wanted to do with my life. I discovered throughout the making of the short, that I wanted to go into film and be the person who can share and help others become aware of the natural beauties of the world. I enrolled in film school at Capilano University and just started my first semester this September. The Howe Sound helped me find my gift and inspiration. I believe it will help others find theirs. The Burnco's mine does not. It only threatens the little bits of nature we have left. It's nature that gives all of us a reason to be livin' and having fun).

Thank you for your consideration,

…and here's the video I created 3 years ago when I was 15, if you wanted to check it out https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Z9Axg0p8ho

Personal Information Withheld - Burnaby, British Columbia

I am opposed to the BURNCO Rock Products Ltd. proposal to construct a large-scale, open-pit, sand and gravel mine in McNab Creek in Howe Sound. I am for the preservation of McNab Creek and all of Howe Sound.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

This mine would be destroying lots of land and fish habitat. The waters of the howe sound are finally coming back strong with life. This project absolutely can not go through. S.O.S

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

With the multiple projects planned for our region, it has been challenging to adequately review these projects sufficiently. That is an issue that needs to be addressed. If such a large number of significant projects are going to be proposed with such tight timeframes, it may be important to consider capacity funding to support adequate community evaluation of projects.

Although I spent a lot of time reviewing the WoodfibreLNG proposal, it only came to light that they had significantly misrepresented their GHG emissions when I was reviewing the subsequent Mt. Mulligan proposal from FortisBC. (WoodfibreLNG used an unrealistically low GHG factor for their electricity consumption). When I tried to raise this with the CEAA during their GHG review of WoodfibreLNG, they said they weren't going to review something the BC EAO had signed off on, regardless if I was correct. If the BC EAO isn't going to catch such issues, and the CEAA won't review the BC EAO work then it's important to fund citizens to conduct a sufficient evaluation of these projects.

The above is the reason why my own comments regarding the Burnco project are much shorter. I did take the time to thoroughly review the attached "Burnco - Issues - Chris Pettingill.pdf" document. Although I did not personally draft the document, I strongly agree with the concerns raised.

In addition to the issues raised in the attachment, I have serious concerns around deficiencies in cumulative impact analysis included in the Burnco application:

- The application seems to think that in terms of socio-economic impacts, it is too far from Woodfibre to have any interaction. However, both facilities are in the Sea-to-Sky "Corridor", and are all part of "Howe Sound". The many tourists travelling to Whistler experience the sound as a contiguous area that has has a positive transition from over-industrialization back to natural beauty. Many new business and residents have arrived precisely because of this natural beauty. A return of multiple significant industrial projects on Howe Sound should be evaluated for cumulative socio-economic impacts, especially on tourism, and the region's natural brand. An assessment that fails to recognize that all development on the whole Sound impacts the whole sound is seriously flawed. The assessment also makes absolutely no mention of the new compressor station planned for Mt. Mulligan which is again further re-industrialization of the area. Any significant shift in econo> - The application does not seem to address the approved WoodfibreLNG cooling system. Cetaceans and fish alike travel the whole Sound. Although these facilities may have distance between them, they represent a growing collection of stresses on fish and other wildlife that travel the whole sound. The cumulative stress needs to be addressed. We're not dealing with goldfish that stay confined to a little bowl. The project should not be considered for approval without a more comprehensive assessment on the cumulative impacts on fish and wildlife has been completed and made available for public comment.

- The geography of the Sound makes it a funnel for pollution, and even today we see a concentration of pollution from the lower mainland funnel up through Squamish on some summer days. The cumulative impacts assessment fails to take the impacts on Squamish from the Burnco operations, and it fails to address the additional impacts from the proposed Mt. Mulligan compressor. An air quality assessment needs to consider how pollutants travel in the sound, and the cumulative impacts of all major projects. Mt. Garibaldi has also been excluded, and yet it represents a significant addition to regional traffic (pollution) and thus Howe Sound pollution. Once again, public comment on an adequate cumulative assessment of air impacts that actually considers all relevant projects in the Sound should be a necessary part of any consideration of approval.

I'd further like to add that he WoodfibreLNG impact statement did not include cumulative assessments that considered the Mt. Mulligan project, or the related hydro substation. The proposed Mt. Mulligan impact statement did not include a cumulative assessment that considered WoodfibreLNG or the related hydro substation to any significant degree in terms of pollution. Mt. Garibaldi also neglected to include some/all of these projects in its cumulative assessment. Now we have yet another major industrial project proposed, and still has been no comprehensive cumulative assessment of socio-economic or environmental impacts that includes all of these projects. Enough is enough. Before ANY significant project is allowed to proceed the public needs someone to provide a comprehensive cumulative assessment that considers all of these projects. Doing so is supposed to be a requirement of the EA process, and yet so far, everyone has managed to avoid doing the necess a ry work.

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Personal Information Withheld - Gibsons, British Columbia

Howe Sound will be left with a hole filled with water that cannot grow trees, and estuary values for the future is reduced to near zero. The proponent takes away $200 million of gravel and may leave 1/10 behind in economic value. There are other BC gravel deposits where the harm would be far less than removing the estuary. The proponent made a bad investment and the Howe Sound should not have to pay for a poor business decision. No one can predict how the loss of the estuary will factor into the future of howe sound in 20-100 years. There is no alternative to the habitat of the McNab estuary. Burnco cannot build another replacement estuary for any price

Personal Information Withheld - Tatlayoko Lake, British Columbia

Dear Environmental Assessment Office,

I am a property owner in BC. I lived several years in the Vancouver, Howe Sound area, and it is an incredibly beautiful place. I believe very strongly that you should be applying great care to preserve and protect this diverse and important area of the natural world. It is the playground of Vancouver, and as such it should be protected and shared. Please consider carefully your decisions to allow a aggregate mine in this area. It will be remembered for many years in the future.

Krista Page-Cowan - North Vancouver, British Columbia

As a life long North Shore resident and avid swimmer of Howe Sound I am opposed to the Burnco Mine Project proposal. There are too many potential environmental risks associated with the project.Just recently we have seen an improvement in water quality in Howe Sound after many years of cleanup from the Brittania mine. There is enough industry impacting the waters of Howe Sound. The salmon and other species that call the Howe Sound home need to be preserved and protected. The environment needs to be a priority over profit.

Deborah Geoffrion - Gibsons, British Columbia

I amvery concerned about the health of the estuary in the area proposed for the Brunco mine. It has taken decades for the herring and salmon and subsequent whales and olphins to recover in this area and to pollute and destroy it with this gravel mine would be a huge diservice to the wildlife, tourist and recreation in the area. This area is far more valuable as an estuary, recreational boating and tourist destination. Please see the bigger picture that detroying it with noisy, filthy gravel mining would result in loss of value for all species who live in the area and would cost far more than the income derived from a gravel pit by the loss of tourist revenue, fishing incomes and potential property values that would plumet in this currently recovered breathtaking area. This area is much better suited to a world class marine park with its close proximity to Vancouver while offering unequalled marine habitat beauty and diversity.

Peter von Puttkamer - West Vancouver, British Columbia

I grew up on the Howe Sound, beginning in the late 50's. Just as the Howe Sound has been cleaned up from years of environmental damage from the Woodfibre Pulp Mill, and Anaconda Mines- now this? This gravel operation will be a threat to McNab Creek estuary- Salmon Habitat! We don't need any industry on Howe Sound. This is an ecological and tourism wonder- that should be left as a showcase to the world: viewed by millions of people heading to Squamish, Whistler and the interior of the Province. Leave Howe Sound alone industry!

Pete Willis - Bowen Island, British Columbia

I do not support the Burnco Aggregate McNab Creek project. A lot of resources have gone into restoring the McNab Creek environment and placing a large industrial project on the estuary will nullify all of it. Howe Sound is just now recovering from its recent industrial past and mega projects with large eco footprints and a long future time line do not bode well for the newly expanding marine life in the sound. Please say no to the Burnco gravel mine.

Jan Hagedorn - Gibsons, British Columbia

This application fails to properly address how local amenities of silence and the wilderness experience, that local residential communities/ camps/yacht outstations, and huge Howe Sound visitors have high on their priority list, will be protected. As this area is so close to Vancouver it has become a huge recreational hub for the lower mainland and it is only going to continue to rise as people crave to leave the city for a quiet serene wilderness experience.

In this proposal there seems to be 12 job gains and I see no comparison to the job losses that might occur if this gravel mine is permitted to come into this highly sought out recreational area. The impact of marine noise (from the conveyor belts –tugs, barge loading and water taxis) is huge for humans who are attracted to this area for the silence and it is this silence that needs to be assessed as the driving force of future jobs in this area. Also the the impact of marine noise on underwater habitat, especially spawning salmon/young juvenile salmon and other at risk species is underestimated by the Science in this project proposal. My understanding is that the project has been rejected twice by Fisheries & Oceans because of the likely loss of salmon habitat in McNab. Do we need more losses to a very fragile salmon returns????? It seems that population data for many key aquatic and land-bases species specific to this unique wilderness estuary (salmon, trout, elk to name a few) was collected over a very small timeline(part year?) to really be useful for establishing accurate baselines, and without accurate baselines quantitative monitoring of the effects of this proposed project will not be possible. At lease 5 years would provide info for agreed norms. This would allow the local governing bodies (eg. SCRD), the power to compel a reduction/suspension or cessation of mine activites where habitat damage exceeds pre-agreed norms. Thank you for the space to comment.

Celia Roges - Chilliwack, British Columbia

My whole family is appalled that you would consider gravel mining in McNab Inlet. Howe sound is just beginning to recover from the serious enviromental traumas it has received in the past and just when the porpoises and fish, and even a whale, are returning we hear you are about to destroy the recovery with an even more appalling one !

Personal Information Withheld - Whistler, British Columbia

No to the gravel pit

LGL Ltd. - Sidney, British Columbia

Submission

Future of Howe Sound Society - Howe Sound, British Columbia

The attached letter contains comments from the Future of Howe Sound Society.

Comment Submission

Personal Information Withheld - Gibsons, British Columbia

no to pollution and development.

She Ronson - Vancouver, British Columbia

Please do not destroy this important salmon habitat and beautiful piece of the BC coast for a gravel pit. The world does not need more concrete but it does need more fish and wildlife. Be an ecologically responsible company instead & choose ethics over dollars. In your hearts you know this is right.

Personal Information Withheld - West Vancouver, British Columbia

This would threaten the existing tourism industry, and the recovering environment for wildlife. The whales and others are returning. This is more important to the future of the area than any extraction industry.

Personal Information Withheld - Gibsons, British Columbia

Please do not commence with s gravel pit mine in Mcnab creek.

Howe Sound is finally coming back ecologically from years of damage by big business.

I live here. I love boating , swimming and enjoy watching the seals and whales.

The impact to the smaller sea life ..salmon could be a disaster.

Please. No.

Personal Information Withheld

PLEASE don't build a gravel pit mine in any of the estuaries of Howe Sound.

One Hundred and ninety acres is huge and disrupts (eliminates) one of only three river estuaries in Howe Sound. The Squamish River estuary is contaminated with Mercury and will remain so.

Who will defend the voiceless creatures that depend on this habitat ... this represents serious concerns as it is a high risk to Salmon and will limit access to bears and elk etc. What of the spotted owl ? It will create the noise and light pollution.

Pristine estuaries are rare ... gravel can be obtained elsewhere.

Please do not allow this.

10. The mine will have an impact on the economic potential of the Howe Sound area. There is considerable potential in Howe Sound to continue to grow the tourism industry with significant economic multipliers that would accrue to the local economy. A mine is not going to add to the beauty of the area.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

I am concerned for the wildlife and decisions the government is making. Keep Howe sound clean. We don't want LNG or gravel mine.

Kate Thomas-Peter - Bowen Island, British Columbia

I live in Howe Sound on Bowen Island. The Sound has relatively recently shown signs of recovery from previous pollution sources. It is a jewel of nature so close to a major city, giving access to nature for millions of people, the benefits of which are well documented for physical, mental and spiritual health. It should be a protected area with great caution over agreeing to mines or quarries that are both a blot on the landscape and a potential source of pollution. Please do not grant permission for this gravel pit.

Lea Bancroft - North Vancouver, British Columbia

The Burrard Yacht Club has owned 15 acres at Ekins Point on the north end of Gambier Island for roughly 25 years where our family oriented boating club has built and maintained a large Outstation (marine moorage facility) located directly across Thornborough Channel from the proposed BURNCO McNab Valley Aggregate Mine. This property is well used year round by the families of our 380+ members (5,500 man-days annually) who will be directly detrimentally affected by the proposed BURNCO McNab Valley Aggregate Mine. Our concerns that do not appear to have been correctly addressed within Burnco's Project Application documents are:

References to Long Term Industrial Use in the McNab Valley:

BURNCO's proposal comments that heavy industry has previously taken place in the McNab Valley over many decades and therefore their project should also be allowed and approved is misleading.

Logging is a Primary Industry that has historically taken place intermittently throughout the McNab Valley over many decades harvesting the renewable forest resources. These operations have created employment and bolstered the provincial economy while creating temporary disturbance where forest regrowth has taken place in the valley within a few years. In recent years the size of the forest tenure cut-blocks have been reduced and the resulting detrimental effects have been reduced in both size and duration.

Conversely the proposed Burnco McNab Valley Aggregate Mine would be a Secondary "Processing" Industry that would operate continuously in one (1) fixed location close to local stakeholders, a minimum of 10 hours per day,5 days per week, 52 weeks per year, over the next 15-20 years.

This continuous prolonged Secondary industry will have a far more detrimental permanent effect on local stakeholders than the previous Primary logging industry while permanently altering the habitat by forever removing a large portion of the McNab Valley alluvial fan leaving in its place a large water filled pit/pond. These are definitely two (2) distinctly different degrees of industrialization in this natural rural environment.

Noise Impacts:

Based upon our many years of experience at this location, the noise level mapping provided within the proponent's application appears to be questionable. Low level noise currently created by periodic use of the log dump and booming grounds at the base of the McNab Valley are clearly heard across Thornborough Channel. As this log handling background noise is relatively subdued, temporary, and in keeping with historical usage it is accepted. However additional industrial noise created by the proposed BURNCO mine and barge loading terminal operating a minimum of ten (10) hours per day, (5) days per week, 52 weeks per year, over the next 15-20 years will have a long term detrimental effect on the use and enjoyment of this area by the long term property owners and recreational visitors using this area in Howe Sound.

Increased Marine Traffic Impacts:

Concerns are noted in the application regarding the ongoing safety of recreational boaters in Thornborough Channel from increased commercial tug and barge traffic in the area. However, if the proposed terminal location goes ahead there is no mention of concern for the safety of the many docks and/or vessels securely moored in the surrounding area (up to 50 boats at our facilities alone). Increased tug and water taxi traffic in Thornborough Channel will have a significant detrimental effect on the safe ongoing use of our dock facilities located at Ekins Point. All it takes is one (1) commercial tug or water taxi coming or going too fast from the BURNCO terminal to create a very significant wake that could result in safety issues and/or personal injuries, along with significant damage to both the moored vessels and/or the dock facilities. Although we currently have substantial breakwaters at our Ekins Point Outstation this is a very real event that could occur m any times over the projected 15-20 year life of the project. Has such an event been discussed with BURNCO and who will be responsible and/or liable for any damages and/or the costs of increased maintenance to our facilities associated with the additional marine traffic servicing the proposed project over the next 16 years?

To help mitigate the previously noted concerns would it be feasible to relocate the proposed Barge Loading Terminal into the existing area currently zoned for Secondary Industry at Port Mellon to be fed by conveyors from the mine site. This area around Port Mellon is relatively uninhabited due to its long term Secondary Industrial use where it currently supports a growing industrial economy in the SCRD. This relocation would help to minimize the effects of this project to local stakeholders while possibly avoiding the need for the required rezoning in the McNab valley. Current marine towing routes in and out of the Port Mellon area could also be used with little or no effect to local users.

Socio-Economic Impacts:

Yes, the proposed BURNCO Project may create up to 8-12 full time jobs along with a debatable number of spin-off jobs but permitting this continuous Secondary Industry in this growing rural environment will seriously damage the area's future prosperity including residential, recreational, and eco-tourism growth, along with hundreds of spin-off jobs, and taxable property values.

As one (1) small example of the direct economic benefits of recreational use in this area, the Burrard Yacht Club's current contribution to the Sunshine Coast Regional District is roughly $ 235,000.00 / year

This type of recreational economic input will be significantly reduced if the proposed BURNCO Open Pit/Pond Aggregate Mine is approved. Current and future residential and recreational users will simply decide to spend their leisure time and dollars elsewhere versus going to this area of Howe Sound, where industrial re-growth appears to be favoured over the previously promoted natural recreation and residential usage in this area of the Sea to Sky Corridor.

This area of Howe Sound is a highly valued natural resource to the current local stakeholders, communities, and government bodies, who have collectively invested a lot more time and money in this area over a far longer period than BURNCO Rock Products has within only the last few years.

The chief benefactor of this project over the next 15-20 years will be a single vertically integrated Alberta based company, Burnco Rock Products, but approving this project will have serious long term negative impacts on the local property owners and communities who have maintained the economy, created jobs, paid taxes, and helped to stimulate the ongoing environmental recovery in this area.

There are currently other commercially available sources of aggregate on the BC coast and another open pit gravel mine / rock crushing operation in this area of Howe Sound is simply not the best use of these valuable natural resources.

How do you put a value on this easily accessed quiet natural "escape" environment that is now becoming a very rare and desirable commodity in such close proximity to the growing world class city of Vancouver?

Personal Information Withheld - Port Moody, British Columbia

Please reject the Burnco Aggregate Project application. There is no benefit to the local community, only loss of quality of life from noise and industrial activity

The noise from the gravel crushing facility and loading of barges will be significant. It will have a negative impact on the enjoyment of the area by boaters, kayakers, fishermen, tourists and other in Howe Sound. The mine developer has stated at meetings that if the demand is there, they want to run the mining and crushing facilities 24/7, 365 days a year.

Noise and light pollution will have significant negative impacts on the land and aquatic animals in the area. Noise and vibration pollution have been found to negatively impact the ability of marine mammals to communicate, navigate, find food and it is believed increasingly to impact their fertility.

The mine will have an impact on the economic potential of the Howe Sound area. There is considerable potential in Howe Sound to continue to grow the tourism industry with significant economic multipliers that would accrue to the local economy. A mine is not going to add to the beauty of the area only diminish it.

Personal Information Withheld - Gambier Island, British Columbia

I am a long time resident of Gambier Island and I absolutely oppose this project. I resent having to spend time on this, since it should not even be considered due to complete incompatibility with the ecological and social values present. Please put an end to this.

Chris Gordon - Port Coquitlam, British Columbia

Howe Sound is doing so well, thanks to the efforts of environmentally concerned citizens taking action. Please don't allow this mine to proceed and set back all the hard work done to date. We don't need it, we don't want it.

Eoin Finn - Bowyer Island Howe Sound, British Columbia

I am opposed to granting this project an Environmental Certificate. Locating a dusty, noisy and environmentally destructive mine in the middle of iconic Howe Sound is simply unacceptable. I have attached a report from the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) organization on the noisiness of typical aggregate mines. This does not belong in Howe Sound - refuse it.

Personal Information Withheld - West Vancouver, British Columbia

A beautiful estuary full of life and part of a sensitive ecosystem should not be destroyed. Especially for the benefit of a very few. Granting rights to damage an area full of vitality would be backward thinking.

Birgitta von Krosigk - Lions Bay, British Columbia

I am opposed to Burnco's proposed gravel mine at McNab Creek in Howe Sound, regardless of the company's proposed mitigation plans.

This is the wrong development, in the wrong place, for the wrong reasons, at the wrong time, using a seriously flawed process.

Wrong Development

Burnco proposes to mine 20 million tons of gravel from the ancient McNab Estuary for the next 16 years. This project will have large negative environmental and health impacts for residents, visitors, and future generations – of people, as well as land, air, and marine wildlife.

Such environmental destruction in exchange for corporate benefit flowing to a privately held, Alberta-owned company, and a handful of jobs, is not sustainable development in the sense of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, to which Canada is a signatory.

Wrong Place

Having lived in Lions Bay for almost 20 years, I am very fortunate to be able to see, hear, and enjoy evidence of the amazing recovery happening in Howe Sound on a daily basis.

Visitors from the Lower Mainland, the rest of Canada, and from all over the world routinely tell me how lucky I am to live in such a beautiful place, how much they have loved their visit, how much they look forward to returning, and how they will recommend others to visit this precious gem, so close to Vancouver, Squamish and Whistler/Blackcomb, all top-notch tourist destinations in their own right.

They are astonished and perplexed to learn about the current onslaught of industrial re-development projects up and down the Sound.

Why risk ruining something so precious, which is so important to local recreation and tourism alike?

As noted by the David Suzuki Foundation in its 2015 report entitled "Sound Investment – Measuring the Return on Howe Sound's Ecosystem Assets":

  • The Howe Sound ecosystem is of critical importance to keeping our environment in balance
  • The sound provides habitat and sheltered access to a range of species and is high in biological diversity
  • The aquatic environments support over 650 different species of fish and invertebrates, including rock cod, salmon, shellfish and herring
  • Marine mammals include seals, sea lions, dolphins, orcas and humpback whales

"One can estimate the health of the aquatic ecosystems by considering the status of salmon and orcas, which are keystone or indicator species that are sensitive to changes in water quality, trophic webs and pollution levels. The closure of the salmon fishery and rarity of orca sightings over the past few decades appear to fit the classic ecosystem theory that size of organisms declines with degraded ecosystems.

To the amazement of all, this trend is reversing. The salmon fishery has re-opened, orcas have returned and humpback whales have been sighted."

David Suzuki Foundation (2015) "Sound Investment – Measuring the Return on Howe Sound's Ecosystem Assets", p. 20

Wrong Reasons

Burnco says it needs the gravel to meet ever increasing demands for aggregate in the Lower Mainland. However, by Burnco's own admission, "the volume of aggregate we are applying to mine through this project is up to 20 million tonnes, which by itself wouldn't even fulfill the need required in the Lower Mainland for one year — 30 million tonnes" (Burnco's website).

So why risk ruining precious environmental resources and values in spectacular Howe Sound if it is only going to be a drop in the bucket?

Giving a private Alberta company a way to off-set corporate profits elsewhere seems a very poor reason to allow re-industrialization of Howe Sound.

Nor should this be seen as a way to provide jobs. Once up and running, there will only be 12 jobs. Far more current jobs will be protected, and far more new ones will be created, WITHOUT this gravel mine.

The ecosystem benefits of Howe Sound have been conservatively valued at between $800 million and $4.7 billion PER YEAR (2014 CAD). As further noted by the David Suzuki Foundation:

  • Ecosystem services do not appear on the market, balance sheets or decision-making frameworks, yet they are essential for life, societal well-being and our economies

Wrong Time

As further noted by the David Suzuki Foundation:

  • pollution from past industrial activity created a dead zone, where marine life was hard to find
  • costly investments were needed to replace the lost ecosystems and to rehabilitate the damaged environment
  • recovery efforts, which began in 1988, have been effective
  • life is returning to the sound, signalling ecosystem recovery
  • this recovery is of great interest to scientists around the world, as little is known of the dynamics of marine recovery

Allowing Burnco to go ahead with this Gravel Mine in the vulnerable McNab Estuary, will – no matter the number and types of mitigation measures taken – reverse the trend toward recovery in Howe Sound and represent a huge waste of the dollars and hours spent to date to repair and restore the damaged environment from past industrial enterprises.

The Federal Government recently announced the appointment of an Expert Panel to review the Environmental Assessment process (which was gutted by the previous government). I wonder if Burnco is pushing for project now, before any possible strengthening of the Environmental Assessment process?

Flawed Process

Howe Sound is under threat from a number of big projects. The current environmental assessment process only looks at one project at a time, rather than considering the cumulative and knock-on effects of multiple projects. Once there is one facility creating noise, air and water pollution, it may seem "natural" to allow another.

As noted by the David Suzuki Foundation"

  • Industrial resurgence and nature recovery must be considered together — not in the current piecemeal approach that could set them on a collision course.
  • The future of Howe Sound's environment and economy is intricately connected.
  • Careful choices must be made to ensure a healthy and sustainable future for natural systems and the economy.

I attended one of the public information sessions hosted by Burnco.

On my way out, I was offered a jar of "free" honey. No thank you. No amount of honey can make this a sweet deal.

Do not grant Burnco permission to re-industrialize Howe Sound.
Reject this proposal.

(To access the David Suzuki Foundation report: http://www.davidsuzuki.org/publications/downloads/SoundInvestment-HoweSoundEcosystemAssets.pdf)

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Claire Weeks and Peter Wing - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Howe Sound was extensively damaged by past industrial activity. It has taken several decades to begin to reverse some of the resulting damage. Toxic and cancer-causing chemicals were being used in the paper mills, creosote was being used as a piling preservative with damage to the ecosystem resulting. The water below the surface layer was the colour of Coca Cola and has been slowly recovering. Over the past 30 years, advances in environmental legislation and closure and remediation of past industrial sites has reduced pollution in Howe Sound. Recovery of marine life over the past 15 years, and particularly over the past 5 years, is indicated by the greatly increased presence of whales, dolphins, pink and Chinook salmon, and herring and anchovy. The Province has invested heavily in this recovery, not the least of which is the ongoing cost of managing Britannia Mine effluent. As a consequence of all these changes, and the increasing demands of the growing populat ion of metropolitan Vancouver, recreational use of Howe Sound has increased dramatically. We are Bowen residents and frequently kayak in the Sound. A large new industrial operation in McNab Creek's fertile estuary, with major disruption to animal, fish and bird habitats, is totally out of line with these trends. This is especially true as there are less damaging options (listed by Dr Bob Turner) which should be considered rather than diverting and damaging the McNab estuary.

http://www.nsnews.com/news/how-now-howe-sound-1.346230

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/british-columbia/return-of-industry-threatens-renewal-of-howe-sounds-marine-ecosystem/article14952818/

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

Cumulative impact assessment should be done re dark night skies in Howe Sound.

If Woodfibre LNG and BURNCO are built, that will make WF, BURNCO, and Howe Sound Pulp and Paper all with safety lights on at night at their industrial plants and dock facilities.

Anton van Walraven -Bowen Island, British Columbia

Dear staff,

Please find my comments concerning the Burnco proposal for McNab creek Howe Sound in the attached document.

public comment submissionpublic comment submissionpublic comment submissionpublic comment submissionpublic comment submissionpublic comment submissionpublic comment submission

Stephen Foster - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Please accept this submission for the EAO process for Burnco's aggregate mine project proposal on McNab Creek.

I am submitting this based on my knowledge of Howe Sound in my work with the David Suzuki Foundation and as a Bowen Island resident who cares deeply about the sustainability of projects in this region.

I have convened numerous community forums and meetings in the Howe Sound region over the past three years. People consistently speak to the desire to help nurture a fragile marine recovery we're experiencing after years of pollution to the region. No one wants to see us return to an era when marine dead zones defined our ocean. I've heard many express a desire to live within the bounds of nature and to be guided by an understanding that economic opportunities must be based on an understanding of ecosystem health.

I understand that environmental risks associated with this project may include mitigating for the impact of climate change on water quality and flows and potential effects on wildlife, in particular, salmon.

Unfortunately, the short time given to read and comment on technical information and project-related communications between the government and industry limits me from more substantive comments.

I would like to focus on one area that I believe this project must uphold if we are to hold companies responsible for the pollution they create and the remediation they promise. That area is financial sureties. I believe that it must be a requirement for this project to proceed to require substantial financial sureties up front before project approval is given.

These sureties must include covenants and caveats that benefit both the environment and taxpayers. This requirement is supported by the 2012 federal Auditor General's report on environmental financial liability: http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_cesd_201212_02_e_37711.html

Chapter 2 of the report states: "The environmental costs resulting from natural resource development projects can run into tens of millions—or in rare cases billions of dollars". The report estimates the cost to clean up federal contaminated sites exceeded $7 billion, with costs increasing every year.

Environmental financial assurances are an important safeguard for the environment. They provide funds for future environmental liabilities to be paid by a proponent or operator. They also provide for liabilities arising from projects with long lifespans where costs associated with decommissioning may not become known for decades. In conjunction with a regulatory framework, they can act as a powerful incentive to industry to reduce environmental impacts as a core part of business.

Environmental financial assurances are a tangible example of the polluter-pays principle in action. Burnco must be required at the outset to cover costs associated with environmental protection, site reclamation, longer-term protection of closed sites and damages from accidents.

So how much would be a reasonable amount for Burnco to put up for this project? In a rough estimate based on the David Suzuki Foundation's report, 'Sound investment: Measuring the Return on Howe Sound's Ecosystem Assets' (http://davidsuzuki.org/publications/reports/2015/sound-investment-measuring-the-return-on-howe-sounds-ecosystem-assets/), I'm able to submit a general estimate provided by the report's author. She estimates a range of $3-$9 million for the non-market benefits of nature that will be impacted by the Burnco project. Of course, this is very conservative and excludes market impacts. That means that by building the Burnco project, we will be taking away the ability of nature to provide essential services valued in the millions of dollars' range.

This figure is based on:

  • up 70 hectares impacted (assuming all impacts are confined to site)
  • economic values related to land classes:
    estuary (15% of total area or 10.5 ha) => $685 – 1,766. Value range = $7,193 - $18,543 foreshore [riparian buffer] (10% or 7 ha) => $945 – 37,085. Value range = $6615 – $266,595 forest => (70% or 49 ha) => $5,045 – 11,820. Value range = $247,205 - $579,180
    TOTAL: (annual) – $261,013 - $864,318

If the project lasts over 16 years, with a 5 per cent discount rate = $2.8 million - $.9 million for the non-market benefits of nature.

Services accounted for in this analysis include water filtration, nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, carbon storage, habitat, recreation & tourism, nature based education, disturbance regulation, disturbance regulation, clean air and waste treatment. This analysis does not account for food, medicinal resources, genetic resources, maintenance of culture, spiritual and religious.

Federal U.S. departments are now required to use this form of natural capital accounting in their decision-making and I believe the same approach would be effective, and essential, for the Burnco aggregate mine project.

As a Howe Sound resident, I want any project proposed for my region to be sustainable – both economically and environmentally. While I don't predict the worst possible outcomes, experience has taught us that marine health is not possible when polluters aren't required to remediate their projects. I live in fear of the same thing happening again as happened with the deadly flow of acid rock drainage from the closed Britannia mine site, at the very time we are witnessing the return of humpback whales, porpoises, salmon, herring and so much more.

Please require Burnco to put up a reasonable financial surety (in the $3 to $9 million range). This should be a minimal requirement and assurance that this project will in fact be sustainable.

Krista Page-Cowan - North Vancouver, British Columbia

As a life long North Shore resident and avid swimmer of Howe Sound I am opposed to the Burnco Mine Project proposal. There are too many potential environmental risks associated with the project.Just recently we have seen an improvement in water quality in Howe Sound after many years of cleanup from the Brittania mine. There is enough industry impacting the waters of Howe Sound. The salmon and other species that call the Howe Sound home need to be preserved and protected. The environment needs to be a priority over profit.

Personal Information Withheld - West Vancouver and Mickey Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

I oppose the Burnco application for following reasons:

  • LOCATION UNSUITABLE. Far too close to existing residential properties. The unsightliness, noise and pollution from gravel mine and crush mill would be intolerable. SCRD in 2009 refused permit for McNab Creek aggregate mine.
  • LOSS OF HABITAT. The likely loss of salmon habitat in McNab creek due to aggregate mining has caused Fisheries and Oceans Canada twice to reject the project application. That should be the end of it
  • SPECIES AT RISK. If, as has been documented by Burnco consultants, McNab creek is home to more than a dozen species at risk, including Roosevelt Elk which were reintroduced there in 2001 by the BC Ministry of Environment, it follows that project approval should be rejected under the terms of the Precautionary Principle.
  • BARGE TRAFFIC HAZARD. Howe Sound is a thriving tourist destination. The addition of up to half a dozen tug/gravel barge transits daily through the sound further would complicate already busy commercial and recreational vessel traffic patterns in that narrow waterway, thereby increasing significantly the risk of serious accident.
  • PRIOR CONSULTATION. McNab Creek lies in Sechelt traditional territory. The Sechelt First Nation has not been consulted by Burnco regarding the proposed gravel quarry. Community approval not granted

Tim Turner - Gibsons, British Columbia

When will the politicians who represent us have the courage, the vision and the boldness to act in our collective best interest and say no to the Burnco proposal? Now I hope. There is nothing as valuable to the people of the Sea to Sky region than a large healthy estuary, the integrity of its sound scape and the powerful symbol of a wild place that we protected because we knew that the McNab Creek estuary is worth way more than the gravel beneath it.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

I do not agree with this project because of its impact on critical salmon habitat, eco tourism, and the future of Howe sound.

Personal Information Withheld - Ontario

WAKE UP. Please don't destroy Howe Sound again.

Sunshine Coast Regional District - Sechelt, British Columbia

  Sunshiine Coast Regional District Sunshiine Coast Regional District

Sunshine Coast Regional District - Sechelt, British Columbia

Sunshine Coast Regional District Sunshine Coast Regional District Sunshine Coast Regional District Sunshine Coast Regional District Sunshine Coast Regional District

Dr. Karen & Dr. Brian Funt - Copper Cover/Whytecliff area, West Vancouver, British Columbia

My husband and I live directly on Howe Sound. Any commercial enterprise that will compromise our recovering environmental treasure is pure short-term insanity. I strongly oppose the Burnco Aggregate Project. Howe Sound should be designated a National Park. Our Howe Sound environment is just recovering, with whales, stellar sea lions, and dophins returning. This is a tourist attraction fro the entire lower mainland. A gravel pit with it's increased ship traffic and tailings that would endanger salmon and other species should definitely be OFF the table if the Liberal Government on both the Provincial and Federal levels cares about the environment like it says that it does.

Personal Information Withheld - Thetis Island, British Columbia

Please find attached letter from Islands Trust Council Chair Peter Luckham.

Comment from Islands TrustComment from Islands TrustComment from Islands TrustComment from Islands Trust

Thomasina Pidgeon - Squamish, British Columbia

I am writing to state my strong opposition to the proposed gravel pit mine in McNab Creek.

First of all- aggregate is a non-renewable resource. For the sake of sustainability, we should as humans immediately stop and realize the long term impact of our choices with regards to the environment, quality of life and our use of non-renewables. Will more roads and traffic really increase our quality of life? No. How sustainable is it to keep going after non-renewables? Especially in such an area as Howe Sound.

In regards to use of fossil fuel- Burnco argues for the use of barges to transport the gravel so it isn't traveling on the roads... But what happens once the barge lands?? It will go onto trucks! Just because it isn't loaded onto trucks immediately- does not mean its impact and use of fossil fuel will be less. Why isn't this more long term travel of the gravel taken into account for impact to the environment?

The barges themselves will impact the water on which is travels. What happens if it spills into the ocean?

The gravel pit mine will have a negative impact on tourism. Howe Sound is a beautiful place, which would should be considered a national park. We should strive to protect it instead of re-industrializing it. Which brings me to one of Burncos main arguments: that the area isn't pristine and has had previous damage. And the point is..?? Just because a certain piece of land isn't pristine, does not give a good excuse to develop it. McNab creek is home to salmon, elk, bears, and fish and animals of all sorts. Let them be. Rearrange things to accommodate for the impact this mine will have isn't better" than what's natural there; man made isn't better then how things are natural formed...

Howe Sound is recovering from previous industry. To re-industrialize this area is backwards thinking and inexcusable. This 77 acre pit is one of only three River estuaries in this area. Seems ludicrous to destroy it without a long term land and water use plan.

The project will limit access to the shore for animals that frequent the area to forage. Will you call them on their cell phone to tell them the new path?! Sure, they excuse providing new habitat for that they are killing but new isn't necessarily better.

The change in water patterns will negatively fresh water habitat.

There is risk to salmon habitat and the other fish of the area is not worth taking.

McNab creek is home to 21 species at risk including the Roosevelt Elk who were re-introduced to the area just 15 years ago!!! Talk about confusing the animals!

Noise- this will impact all in the area including fish and animals, tourist and locals. It will negatively impact and confuse underwater creatures.

The vibration of the electric clamshell will be bad for the marine life.

Light pollution- how nice it is to drive along the sea to sky and not be blinded by lights from buildings and such. We need the night sky and the impact of lights to this area will absolutely destroy this!! We need to see the stars. Already, this is getting more difficult. When is enough, enough!!!

This project will also be an eyesore to the many camps in the areas. Is setting up a gravel pit mine that will be surrounded by numerous kids camps really what we want to teach our kids?

At the open house I saw that Burnco made adjustments for damage that will be done but this isn't enough. This area is too beautiful for a gravel pit mine. Further investing in the fossil fuel industry (gravel for roads..) is NOT sustainable. We need to change our ways and immediately stop this destructive path we are on and find new, improved and sustainable ways of living which will not have such adverse effects to that which we love. Howe Sound.

Personal Information Withheld - Gibsons, British Columbia

Salmon returns in BC hit an all time low in 2016. As water temperatures warm to dangerous levels, the BCEAO must take a proactive approach and ensure Proponents include current data and analysis of the effects of climate change on fish/habitat as part of the Environmental Assessment process. Projects such as this, which will negatively impact fish/habit in the short, medium and/or long-term, should not be approved.

Water quality is insufficiently characterized in the application. Removing sediment in the water discharged into the ocean is critical to habitat protection, not least for the nearby eel grass beds and glass sponge reefs. The project should not be approved until the proponent can show that siltation will not cause harm to fish/habitat.

As gravel is extracted from the ground, fresh water from the estuary would flow into the pit. and change the hydraulic nature of the land, resulting in saltwater seeping into the estuary, and into McNab Creek. Saltwater in the estuary and creek could kill a variety of salmon and plants. This project should not be approved before thorough hydrological studies have been done, over several years, and this issue has been adequately addressed.

Burnco's consultants documented that the gravel quarry could be home to 21 species officially at risk. This includes Roosevelt elk. For several key aquatic and land-based species (such as anadromous salmon, resident cutthroat trout and Roosevelt elk), population data was collected over far too narrow a timespan to be useful for establishing accurate baselines. Without accurate baselines, quantitative monitoring of the effects of this project will not be possible. Part-year data is utterly insufficient to establishing accurate baselines. At least five years of data should be collected to afford accurate baselines usable for ongoing monitoring of effects on species populations and habitat.

This proposal would locate a noisy, dusty gravel mine and crush mill next to an existing multi-residential area. It would have very serious impacts on residents and property owners in West Howe Sound and on Gambier Island. Moorages, anchorages, swimming facilities and back-country access have long been part of the McNab Creek area's attractions for Howe Sound visitors and local boating clubs. The application utterly fails to address impacts on residents, property owners and local amenities.

Barge traffic would diminish Howe Sound's recreational and tourism potential and add to the cumulative traffic hazard in Howe Sound. Routes would cross very busy sailing and small-boat recreational areas, the Howe Sound Marine Trail and ferry routes, the path of proposed LNG tankers exiting from the Woodfibre LNG plant and freighters from Squamish Terminals. This exponentially increases the risk of collisions and loss of life in a narrow waterway and diminishes the amenity and tourism use of the Sound. The cumulative effects and worst-case hazard analysis of this project have been underestimated by the Proponent. A cumulative impact assessment, including loss of amenity and tourism value of the Sound, should be completed prior to deciding on this application. So too should a study of the increased hazards associated with increasing the large-vessel traffic in Howe Sound.

Personal Information Withheld - Oshawa, Ontario

I call on you to take action today and stand with the communities and municipalities around the Sound who say NO to Woodfibre LNG and increased greenhouse gas emissions into the airshed.

James Askew- West Vancouver, British Columbia

I am very strongly opposed to this Burnco application. It will be destructive to the watershed, Howe Sound marine life and to the delicate balance of flora and fauna on the current lands. It also employs only a small number of low paid workers, with profits going out of province. Please do not approve this proposal.

Personal Information Withheld - Ontario

This mine should not be built in or near an estuary.

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Page 4-33 states: that "no announcement from MFLNRO has yet been made with respect to the cumulative effects framework implementation in Howe Sound". See attached announcement from the Province of BC May 26, 2015.

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Personal Information Withheld - New Westminister

This is absurd projecthe and should not be allowed.

Eoin Finn - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

I do not want this mine in Howe Sound.

McNab Creek is normally a quiet area of the Sound - a significant reason why the strata owners at McNab and many others live thereabouts. The Burnco mine operation will be noisy- how noisy is clearly documented in the attached study of aggregate mines by the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which shows typical noise levels exceeding 100dba in the immediate vicinity of such facilities. This noise level is not only unacceptable in such an area, it is highly annoying to local receptors and can cause permanent hearing loss in mine workers. As the valley topography will amplify the sound, I think a far more detailed assessment of probable noise and its damage to the quiet enjoyment of the area be done before any permits are considered for this operation.

Submission

Janice Eckert - North Vancouver, British Columbia

This proposed project scares the hell out of me. It should scare everyone. Have never visited Howe Sound and seen its pristine beauty. Dr

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

I am writing to voice my concern over the proposed gravel mine at McNab Creek in Howe Sound. Approval of that mine would amount to short term thinking. Such a mine will destroy McNab Creek as a salmon spawning bed, one more blow to the salmon fishery on the west coast. A gravel mine would last a short time and then would be gone; the workers there would join the unemployed. Salmon fisheries on the other hand, if well managed, have the potential to provide employment, food for people, and vital support for wild life and the ecology in perpetuity.

I urge you to take a long term view, and to choose salmon and the ecology over a short term gravel mine.

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

I am writing to raise several concerns regarding the potential impact of the planned Burnco gravel mine at the McNab Creek site in Howe Sound.

While I lack the expertise to speak to the impacts of this project to the flora and fauna of Howe Sound, the impacts of this project to the human environment of the Sound will be severe and prolonged, if not permanent.

Howe Sound is extensively used for recreational purposes, such as boating, and hiking on an extensive trail network on the eastern edge of the sound, much of which has line-of-sight to the location of the planned mine. The eastern edge of the sound and the islands in the sound are also home to a small but non-trivial population, most of whom live in this area out of a desire for peace and quiet away from most human activity, including industry. The Burnco development is likely to severely impact both categories of people who visit or live in the Howe Sound region.

Recreational use will be impacted by the visual pollution created by the mine. Howe Sound is known for its vistas and those vistas will be negatively impacted by the addition of a mine on the scale of the Burnco project. I have seen no data or estimates on the extent recreational use of the Sound will be impacted by the Burnco project but such data ought to be collected and all necessary steps ought to be taken to ensure that recreational use is not disturbed or reduced by the mine. 'All necessary steps,' in my view, may include denying permission for the mine to be built if the impact on recreational use will be too great.

The impact on residents will likely be more extensive. The largest community in Howe Sound, Lions Bay, has a direct line of sight to the mine location. The value of Howe Sound properties is highly dependent on views of the natural landscape and will likely be adversely impacted by the destruction of the natural landscape at the mine site. This is even more of a concern in light of the progressive clearcutting of the western shore of the Sound. It may well be the case that the Burnco project constitutes the thin end of the wedge where the views of the landscape in the Sound become perceived not—as they are now—as being overwhelmingly natural, but marred by the occasional clearcut, but rather as being industrial and only blessed with the occasional remains of a natural landscape. Such a change in perception, should it occur, will have negative impacts on property values because it will render the environment of the sound less desirable for human habitation. All necessary steps ought to be taken to minimize such impacts on existing property holders.

The most severe impact to existing residents, however, may well be due to noise and vibration from rock crushers and other industrial equipment at the Burnco site. Regional experience from the construction project to upgrade Highway 99 in preparation for the 2010 Olympics is that noise and vibration from rock crushers are disruptively perceptible at distances measured in the tens of kilometres. The prospects of noise pollution from the Burnco project do not appear to have been adequately addressed.

Ongoing noise, and especially vibration, for the duration of the Burnco project would be extremely disruptive to the peacefully quiet environment currently enjoyed by Howe Sound residents. All possible steps ought to be taken to ensure that vibration does not reach even the houses nearest to the mine site under any circumstances and that noise not be audible outside of extremely rare atmospheric conditions.

To be frank, I do not believe the Burnco mine project should proceed. The location is far better suited to remain as-is so that the natural beauty of the Howe Sound region can be enjoyed by future generations instead of permanently damaged by an inherently unsustainable non-renewable resource extraction project. However, if the project must proceed, I believe the following conditions ought to be imposed:

* Unused areas of the mine pits should be filled in and replanted immediately upon disuse in order to minimize the visual footprint of the mine. Consideration ought to be given to covering as much of the site as is practicable with camouflage netting to further reduce the visual footprint of the mine.

* Monitoring and mitigation measures should be implemented to ensure vibration and noise from mine equipment, such as site generator(s) and rock crusher(s), are not perceptible by area residents.

Howe Sound is perceived as a natural gem thanks to its quiet natural vistas. This perception and the reality on which it is based is not compatible with large scale industrial development, such as the Burnco project. When taken in the context of continuing clearcutting of the western side of the Sound and the prospect for further re-industrialization at the Woodfibre site, I believe the Burnco project is a step too far that will ruin the character of the sound not just for the 16 years the site is intended to operate but potentially permanently. The mine does not belong here.

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

I am writing to express my opposition to the Burnco gravel extraction plan proposed for McNab Creek in Howe Sound. The residents of Howe Sound rely on the maintenance of a thriving tourist industry for their livelihoods and the sustainability of their communities. The proposed gravel mine would severely impact the natural scenic beauty of the area and would have, therefore, a consequent negative effect on the area's major industry. The proposed mine and its activities would, therefore, negatively impact the quality of life of Howe Sound residents.

The proposed mine site is situated on the western shore of Howe Sound directly opposite the Sea to Sky Highway, which runs along the eastern shore of the Sound. The Sea to Sky Highway is the only direct land route to Whistler from Vancouver airport and is a direct route from United States/British Columbia border crossings. Hundred of thousands of tourists drive along the Sea to Sky Highway every year on their way to Whistler. This route directly supports and contributes to over one billion dollars per year in tourism income generated by Whistler and the greater Howe Sound area.

Given the proposed placement of the Burnco mine, all users of the Sea to Sky Highway—local residents and tourists will see the mine as they drive along the highway.

The route of the Sea to Sky Highway was chosen by the province in order to take advantage of the spectacular scenic beauty of Howe Sound. The Sea to Sky Highway is, itself, a major tourist attraction in its own right. The highway supports many small businesses along the Howe Sound corridor. For example, several companies rent out high-end cars to those wishing to experience the unique drive to Whistler—a drive rated as one of the top ten best drives in the world. It makes no economic sense to allow a gravel mine operation to scar an environment which generates billions of dollars in tourist revenue each year. The proposed mine would bring in almost zero benefits to the micro economies of the region, and it would put the province in the position of potentially losing millions of dollars to a vital tourist industry which would then produce a knock-on negative effect to local, provincial and federal economies.

I can see no benefit to anyone if this project is allowed to go ahead other than to the balance sheet of a small out of province-based mining company. In my view, the proposal is an example of environmental vandalism driven by corporate greed to the detriment of the local environment and population.

To claim, as Burnco is attempting to do, that the McNab Creek mine would be 'sustainable' is, in my view, ludicrous. How can a gravel mine by described as 'sustainable'? Gravel is a finite resource. If allowed to go ahead, Burnco's mining operations would last until the resource was exhausted. Once Burnco has extracted both its gravel and its profits, the residents of Howe Sound—human, animal, and vegetable will have to deal with the consequences of the company's actions—potentially for decades ahead.

Those tasked with making the decision about whether or not to allow the McNab gravel pit to go ahead should be aware of the recent history of Howe Sound—specifically, the environmental damage caused by the copper mine at Britannia Beach. It has taken over a decade to revive the waters of Howe Sound and, to the present, $46 million dollars to clean up its waters so that it once again can support the mammal and fish species we now see in the Sound. Why put this environmental revival at risk for the profit of so few and the detriment to so many?

Decision-makers should also be aware that Howe Sound is an area of spectacular natural beauty—an area just outside the bounds of Greater Vancouver and, therefore, easily accessible to millions. Why desecrate this beauty and the joy it gives to both local residents and visitors for the profit of a very few individuals?

The vibrancy and diversity of the aquatic life in Howe Sound is well-documented. It is either a permanent home or an important feeding ground for whales, dolphins, and seals as well as herring and salmon among many other sea creatures. The seabed below Howe Sound is home to glass sponges. The banks of McNab Creek are frequented by bear and elk among many other mammals. If the proposed gravel pit goes ahead, it will undoubtedly effect all these species as well as countless others.

As important as protecting the natural beauty and sustainability of the creatures of Howe Sound is, it should not be forgotten that the Sound is home to thousands of human residents. Any industrial activity along the shores of the Sound is bound to directly effect the lives and sustainability of its communities.

Speaking at an 'information session' for the company's first proposed development plan, a Burnco spokesperson said that the major reason Burnco chose Howe Sound for its expansion was because it contained the smallest population of any of the sites under consideration. Burnco reasoned that, because of the relatively low population of the area, the McNab site would generate less opposition from local residents than would be the case if they chose another site. This argument fails to take into account local conditions and the symbiotic relationship between the population, environment and economic viability of the Howe Sound region.

As a resident of Lions Bay, I point out that every single member of this community, (as well as every member of every other community in the Howe Sound region) will be negatively effected should Burnco's gravel extraction plant be approved. I do not think it is an overstatement to say that the existence of Lions Bay, as it is at present, is threatened if any industrial development in Howe Sound takes place.

Communities along Howe Sound are not all bastions of wealth as is commonly thought. They are struggling isolated communities with small tax bases and, because of their mountainous locations, huge infrastructure and maintenance bills. For example, the village of Lions Bay is not self-sustainable. With a population of only 1,318, Lions Bay can raise only a small portion of the monies it needs to maintain a safe infrastructure up to required standards. As such, it relies on government grants to finance even its most basic needs such as a clean sustainable water supply, sewage management and urgent road and bridge repairs.

The proposed gravel extraction pit would be located directly across from Lions Bay. It would be visible to almost every resident; its operations may be heard in every household; it lights would be visible at night in almost every window; and, the plant's vibrations could be felt through every foundation in the village.

In addition to the deterioration in their quality of life caused by the above effects, Lions Bay residents would also face financial disadvantage due to lowered house prices as a result of visual and noise pollution. Lions Bay has already suffered negative impacts due to the location of Highway 99, which runs through the heart of the village. Average house prices in Lions Bay are already significantly lower than in almost every other municipality and district on the North Shore. If even less potential house buyers view Lions Bay (and other effected communities) as a desirable place to buy a house, the tax base will shrink even further, more houses will be left vacant and Lions Bay may become nothing more than an unsustainable ghost town. Given the realities facing the community, the village of Lions Bay stands to lose the most of any constituency and will gain nothing by a Burnco development. In short, any industrialization on the McNab Creek site will erode the viability of Lions Bay as a sustainable community.

In the larger picture, granting Burnco's application for the McNab Creek mine makes no economic sense. It will put the province in the position of potentially losing millions of dollars to a vital tourist industry. It will effect local, provincial and federal economies all in the name of supporting corporate greed. Burnco has stated that the gravel mine will support twelve jobs. There is no guarantee that these jobs will be filled locally, as far as I am aware. However, twelve jobs is a very, very expensive price to pay for the loss of environmental habit, species diversity, quality of life for thousands of people not to mention the jeopardy such development will place on billions of dollars of income from tourism. It is, in my view, senseless, for such a project to go ahead given its costs.

I submit that no industrial development be permitted in Howe Sound—an area worthy of provincial, federal and international heritage site protection. Instead, I submit that the entire Howe Sound region should be comprehensively studied with the aim of maintaining and protecting this wonderful resource for the people of Canada.

If shortsightedness prevails and this act of environmental vandalism is approved, I submit that Burnco should be required to provide quantifiable data to show that its development and operational activities of its McNab site will have no negative effects, such as vibrations, noise or lights, on all co-habiting creatures including those in surrounding communities.

Pamela Proctor - Gibsons, British Columbia

Very important to the boating community, Howe Sound is a relatively compact area, which we are working hard to sustain and maintain. It is relatively 'clean' now and we need to keep the industrialization out in order to keep it that way. Howe Sound is a precious part of our coast, not to be tampered with.

Personal Information Withheld - Gibsons, British Columbia

: I really hope this project doesn't go ahead. It will ruin such a beautiful natural habitat and Howe Sound is just beginning to recover from years of abuse.

Dr Chris Overall - Vancouver, British Columbia

I live in Vancouver, never see the creek but know it from once or twice flying over or boating. It is a crime to destroy a beautiful habitat for wildlife for so few jobs. Not impressed by long project but I get it...thats a lot of jobs and income, but this not..,. Just USA economic interest.

My wife and I oppose this.

Mark Smith - West Vancouver, British Columbia

I'm writing to voice my vehement opposition to the construction of the gravel pitt at McNabb Creek. This is the jewel of Howe Sound and it would not only destroy the serene beauty of the area, but would have a significantly detrimental impact on the wild and marine life, which could reach well beyond to other surrounding lands and waters. Our environment needs to be sustainable for future generations; therefore, I urge you to reconsider this poor decision.

Ruth Simons - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Cumulative Impacts

Page 4-33 states: that "no announcement from MFLNRO has yet been made with respect to the cumulative effects framework implementation in Howe Sound". This is not an accurate statement. In 2015 staff from MLFNRO announced CEF was moving forward and made this presentation to the Howe Sound Community Forum. Documentation exists to confirm this announcement and would be verified by FLNRO staff. Golder's assumptions in many instances throughout this document are not current or well researched which generates a level of distrust about the integrity of this assessment.

Figures 4-4-6 should be compared to 2016 Google Earth images of the areas west of Port Mellon's Howe Sound Pulp and Paper. Log booming storage and processing activity is different in each of the maps and does not appear to be an accurate reflection of the current activity west of Port Mellon. This is relevant for setting the context of this project within Howe Sound. The list of projects considered in the Cumulative Assessment on pages 4-36-43 are missing the log sorting and processing operations taking place at the Hillside Industrial Park and Twin Creeks which can clearly be seen on Google Earth.

To-date human activity has impacted most creeks and estuaries in Howe Sound. Along the Sunshine Coast – West Howe Sound area, active forestry operations at the base of McNair Creek and the Rainy River continue to impact the health of these rivers and estuaries and the ocean around the area. At the mouth of the McNab valley, logging activity is limited to the west end of the estuary and is minimal compared to the areas closer to Port Mellon that are large booming and processing operations where log booms and debris cover large areas of the water. The addition of gravel mining and its related processing and barging activities would add new resource activity to Howe Sound and permanently alter the natural flow of surface and groundwater that flows into the estuary.

Alteration to this one remaining estuary is significant and should protected. The environmental assessment should take into account the value of natural intact wetlands such as the McNab estuary.

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David Bonner - East Vancouver, British Columbia

Please do not approve the application for the Burnco Aggregate Project proposed for McNab Creek. Mining in McNab Creek would destroy the estuary and decimate the natural beauty of the area.

This project would also have severely detrimental effect on fish habitat in the McNab estuary.

Destruction of wildlife habitat and the environment of Howe Sound for the dubious benefit of mining gravel makes no long-term sense, therefore I implore you to not to approve this project, now or in the future.

Thank you for your attention..

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

I would like to add my voice to those that would like to see Howe Sound continue on it's path to recovery.

Like many others I live on the Sea to Sky Corridor.

Like many others too I have cancer. Fortunately I am in now in remission. Currently I am relatively healthy and very happy spending time doing what I love - being outdoors on the water, on the shore or in the mountains above the Sound.

Every day I am so grateful to be alive. To live in such a wonderful place and be so connected to nature and the land.

I draw strength from our place of land, sea and sky. On my trips to and from the Cancer Agency and hospital I drink in Howe Sound. It fills me up and settles me. I take delight in the whale sightings, the news of the recovering Elk population, the annual migration of both sea and songbirds.

The Burnco Gravel mine is one more industry that will irrevocably alter Howe Sound and undo much good that has taken place in recent years. Twelve full time jobs are not worth the effect it will have on the McNabb estuary. It is with great sadness I have seen the redwing blackbird nesting grounds at Nexen Beach be bulldozed under for the new oceanfront development. To hear their song at twilight was absolutely magical. Now no more.

I know that 12 jobs would be created by the mine. This is small number of jobs. Surely we have the potential of creating far more jobs in the tourism and recreation sectors if we keep Howe Sound as a jewel to showcase to the rest of the world. A world thirsting for the natural world.

It is a place of healing. A sanctuary.

Let's strive to keep it so.

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

I wish to voice my concerns regarding the proposed gravel extraction project by Burnco at the Mcnab Creek area. My concerns are as follows the claim by Burnco representatives that this project is sustainable, the impact that this project could have on the tourist industry in the Howe Sound area, the effects that this project could have on the newly recovered marine life of the sound and the impact of this project on the people who live in the Howe Sound region.

At a meeting I attended a Burnco representative claimed that this project would be sustainable. I question how such a project could be sustainable when there is only a finite amount of gravel at this site so how can the extraction be sustainable. Once there is a hole in the ground what will replace the hole?

The Howe Sound area relies heavily on the tourist industry bringing in millions of dollars annually to this area. I see the scars from this project being detrimental to the tourist industry. People do not want to see scarred areas.

I am also concerned about the impact this project would have on the marine life in the Sound due the noise and the vibrations that would be generated by this project. The marine life in the Sound is only now recovering and the ocean is coming back to health after millions of dollars have been spent on clean up. Why throw all this improvement away?

The impact of this project will also effect the people who live on the shores of Howe sound with the threat of noise, light visual pollution plus the more marine traffic in the Sound increases the quality of the air in the Sound.

Howe Sound is a beautiful place that should be protected from industrial development, not a place where some company like Burnco can come for a short period of time and take away part of the Sound leaving the scars behind for a minimum number of people who may not be hired locally for the duration of the project. The approval of this project could be the thin edge of the wedge for more industrial development on the shores of Howe Sound.

The location for this mine was according to a representative of Burnco was chosen over other alternative sites because they believed there would be less opposition from local people.

This seems to me to be sheer arrogance and total disregard for a nation treasure driven by greed on the part of Burnco.

Alison Scully - McNab Creek, British Columbia

I don't understand how digging up an estuary to get at the material that provides natural filters for the very life in the estuary can ever be considered.

I am concerned about how the wildlife will get to the grasses and shoreline once their routes are blocked? From the model presented at the public meeting, the corridor that is left at the end of the project is very narrow. During the project, access will be cut off with a fence.

Peace and quiet are of the highest value to the residents of McNab Creek. Contrary to Burnco's statements, we are not seasonal visitors. We are there year round, every chance we get, and some residents are spending the majority of their retirement there. In their report, Burnco has used the fact that there is an occasional logging truck and dumping of logs into the ocean as the same as machinery constantly dredging and crushing. They've used terms like 'negligible' and 'not significant' when it comes to the noise they will generate. This is just not true and the noise will greatly affect our community.

I'm also concerned about the dead lake they are leaving behind. The model they showed was about as un-natural as it gets. The perfectly straight shore lines were so unattractive and completely at odds with the natural beauty of the area. What happens if there is leakage from the lake into McNab Creek due to the significant rainstorms we receive, or rising tides due to climate change? It's been noted that the lake will not support any life, so leakage won't be acceptable for the environment.

In the application is states the work hours are up to 14 hours per day and they will commit to the SCRD's noise bylaw 7am to 9pm. Working during 'daylight hours' was also a term used (quite a long time during summer - high use months). The operations manager said they are basing operations on 4, 10-hour shifts per week. There is clearly some inconsistency here.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

Howe sound is still on recovery from the Brittania mine, woodfibre past and in threat from woodfibre LNG. Wildlife is returning and increasing howe sounds value as an eco-tourism destination. Eco-tourism is a low-impact low carbon emission industry that is being threatened by carbon intense development and pollution. Whale tours, guided eco-tours watersports are current growing employers.

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

submissionsubmission

Douglas Bay Strata Corp - Gambier Island, British Columbia

DOUGLAS BAY STRATA CORP. - BSC 1539 Douglas Bay, Gambier Island British Columbia

British Columbia Environmental Assessment Office
PO Box 9426 Stn Prov Govt
Victoria, BC V8W 9V1

Burnco Aggregate Mine Project
Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency
Suite 410 - 701 West Georgia Street
Vancouver, BC V7Y 1C6

Dear Sirs/Mesdames,

Re: Burnco Aggregate Project at McNab Creek, British Columbia

This letter is being submitted in connection with your request for public comment on the Environmental Impact Statement submitted by Burnco Rock Products regarding its proposal to create an open pit mine at the McNab Creek estuary.

Douglas Bay Strata Corp. is comprised of the owners of a 53 lot recreational property strata development situated at the north end of Gambier Island. We are situated directly across Thornbrough Channel from McNab Creek and many of our owners' lots face directly out to McNab Creek and the proposed aggregate mine. Our community is a family based development whose owners have been drawn to the location due to its natural beauty and the ability to escape urban distractions while enjoying the recreational opportunities that this area offers to the residents of Howe Sound and all of Metro Vancouver.

Next to the McNab Creek Estates Strata, we are the community that will be most directly affected by this proposed mine and we are very concerned about this proposal. We believe that it is completely inconsistent with the established use of this area and the values and objectives of local communities. It will significantly degrade the social and cultural values of both the local area and Howe Sound as a whole. The establishment of a pit mine in an environmentally sensitive area just when Howe Sound is recovering from years of industrial abuse will have immeasurable social costs not only for residents of Howe Sound but also for the whole of the Lower Mainland.

Howe Sound is a remarkable and unique region and the McNab Creek area is the heart of Howe Sound. Although it is only 45 minutes from Vancouver, it is worlds away from a metropolitan city. The ability to readily experience the great outdoors at its best is one of the things that makes Vancouver one of the world's most livable cities. The social value of allowing residents and visitors to enjoy outdoor recreational activities so easily cannot be readily measured, but it cannot be ignored in assessing the true cost of a project of this nature.

In addition to the established communities who will suffer if this project is approved, there are also two yacht club out-stations that will be directly impacted. In addition, there are three youth camps in the immediate vicinity and numerous other youth camps in and around Howe Sound who travel to the McNab creek area for day and overnight trips. These camps have been attracting young people to the region for more than fifty years. They provide the youth of the Lower Mainland with an opportunity to get away from urban areas and experience the great outdoors. Many Lower Mainland children get their first wilderness experience at these camps. To allow an open pit mine to operate in the epicentre of this natural experience would destroy the very reason that people are attracted to the area. People come here to experience the outdoors without the noise and visual pollution that we all have to deal with in our everyday lives. The social cost of allowing this project to proceed will be immense.

Federal, provincial and local governments have spent millions of dollars promoting the Sea to Sky Corridor internationally as an outdoor tourism destination. Hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent on developing infrastructure to support the growing tourism activities in the region. This taxpayer money has been spent for the purpose of attracting tourists and outdoor enthusiasts from around the world to come to this region. These efforts have met with considerable success and Howe Sound and the Sea to Sky corridor are now ranked as one of the premier outdoor tourist destinations in the world. Approving a pit mine in an environmentally sensitive area in the centre of this region will undermine these efforts at significant cost to the public.

As property owners in the area, we understand what McNab Creek and Howe Sound offer to all residents of the Lower Mainland. In the future, in order to maintain its position as one of the most livable cities in the world, Metro Vancouver's growing population will need to have continued access to the outdoor experiences that many of us have grown up with and have taken for granted. Howe Sound provides unique opportunities not found elsewhere in the world. In Howe Sound, both residents and visitors can experience the great outdoors in a manner that is affordable, with incredible ease of access. Preservation of this natural advantage will allow Metro Vancouver to retain its reputation as one of the most livable cities in the world. A failure to retain this unique advantage will result in a huge social cost that has not been taken into account in Burnco's Environmental Impact Study. Not only will there be a direct cost through loss of quality of life, but the re will be a very real economic cost through the loss of tourism revenue to the area.

For years, Howe Sound suffered through environmental abuse. Over the past few decades, hundreds of millions of dollars have been expended in remediating Howe Sound. These expenditures have led to recovering herring and salmon populations and, for the first time in decades, orcas, white-sided dolphins and humpback whales have returned to the Sound. Not only is this incredibly encouraging from an environmental perspective, it will play a key role in attracting more tourism and outdoor enthusiasts to the area and will help promote investment in the region. The Department of Fisheries and Oceans is on record as opposing this project due to the harmful effect it will have on critical fish habitat and has assessed the project as High Risk. The DFO has also stated that the options for compensation in the Howe Sound region are severely limited. This proposed project provides little or no tangible benefit to the region yet it could imperil the remediation result s that has been achieved through large expenditures of both public and private funds. To jeopardize the environmental recovery that is occurring in the Sound with a project that involves high risks to salmon, freshwater and marine habitat cannot be justified.

Clearly, allowing the development of an open pit mine in the heart of this region will be counter-productive to both the ongoing environmental remediation efforts as well as the region's reputation as an eco-tourism and outdoor recreational destination of choice. The cost to the region and taxpayers will be enormous while the benefits will be marginal. This project will result in little or no infrastructure to benefit the region and is only projected to create twelve jobs, which may well come with the loss of jobs in other areas including at the aggregate supply sites and shipping facilities currently used by Burnco.

Although we cannot see how this project can be justified at any level, we also have specific concerns about the Environmental Impact Study that has been submitted. As a general comment, in reviewing the report that has been submitted, it seems that many of the concerns raised in the initial public comment period for the AIR have been discounted or dismissed without adequate analysis to substantiate the conclusions reached or, in some cases, ignored completely.

1. Burnco attempts to justify this project on the basis that the mine will help meet the Lower Mainland's demand for gravel. However there is no analysis of the available supply from existing locations or from other less environmentally sensitive sites. Burnco's own demands can easily be met from its existing suppliers and industry reports indicate that the currently identified supply sources in the Lower Mainland are sufficient to meet Metro Vancouver's demand requirements for in excess of 100 years.. Burnco is only choosing to proceed with this project based on its own cost structure while ignoring the environmental, social and economic costs of this project that will be borne by the public.

2. The various components of the study have almost invariably been based on assumptions as to the scope and operating hours for the project. However we are very concerned about relying on studies which are based on these assumptions. Burnco's original proposal was based on a much larger pit mine which it intended to operate on a 24/7 basis. At the 2013 open house, a senior Burnco representative openly stated that the company's long-term intentions were to expand the mine operations even beyond what they were presenting at that time. We are very concerned that the project scope as set out in the EIS has been designed to facilitate obtaining initial approval for the project knowing that any application for future expansion will not be subject to the same level of assessment or review. The underlying reports contained in the EIS do not properly assess the potential environmental, social or economic impact that the project will ultimately have since the repo rts are predicated on assumptions regarding the scope of the project which may well severely understate the ultimate size of the project.

3. The analysis of the potential noise impacts is based on assessment parameters regarding acceptable levels of noise in industrial or urban environments. Those measurements are clearly inappropriate for an area which is home to outdoor youth camps and residential communities and whose fundamental nature and attraction is dependent on retaining the characteristics of a wilderness location. The impact of noise on this unique, outdoor recreational area should not be measured by what is considered acceptable levels of noise in industrial or urban areas.

4. We also have great difficulty with the assertion that the noise levels will not be audible on Gambier Island and have to question the validity of a report that arrives at that conclusion. Our on the ground experience is that machinery operating at McNab is clearly audible in our community. The McNab Valley operates as a natural amphitheatre and sound carries across the water unimpeded. The noise that will be generated from the barge loading activity is of particular concern. There will be no sound buffer areas to limit the impact of the noise from the barge loading area and the noise will carry directly across the channel. From direct first-hand experience, we know that the noise level from barges loading and unloading at McNab Creek is enough to wake up our residents during the night.

5. We also question the validity of the conclusion that there will be no cumulative impact from noise when the consultants at the recent open house presentations on the EIS were not even aware of the Box Canyon power project which is now operating in the valley. The noise studies were completed before the power project came on-line and the consultants indicated that the noise created by the Box Creek operations was not even taken into account in the cumulative impact study. Clearly, this brings into question the validity of any conclusions as to cumulative noise impacts that are contained in the report.

6. In its draft AIR, Burnco committed to reporting on the status of consultations with private land owners and tenure holders. However, in Volume 4, Section 21 of the report, there is little evidence that Burnco fulfilled its commitments in this regard. At section 21.2.4.1 - Social Conditions, the listing of Personal Communications shows a dearth of communications with any of the local constituents who will be affected by the proposed project. To our knowledge no-one from Burnco attempted to contact anyone at Douglas Bay even though we comprise the largest private land-holding in the area and will be directly impacted if the project proceeds. It seems clear that the background research undertaken in with respect to the potential social impacts of the project was deficient and so the conclusions reached in the reports must be viewed with great scepticism. From the comments published on the BC EAO website the vast majority of the public has significant conc erns about the social impacts of this project but there has been little effort made by Burnco to communicate with communities or stakeholders who will be affected to properly assess the true social costs of the project or its impact on the surrounding communities.

7. Although we expressed concern during the comment period on the AIR that the proponent's visual and aesthetic viewpoints were inadequate as they were almost entirely based on sea level assessment locations, the assessments that were conducted did not include any height of land assessment sites in the neighbouring communities. We are very concerned that the results do not properly assess the impact on our owners, a number of whose lots or building sites are at heights above sea level and look directly at the project location. This is another example of where the concerns of neighbouring communities have not been properly reviewed or assessed in the studies undertaken by Burnco.

8. In a number of areas, the EIS identifies potential environmental impacts of the project but suggests that these can be managed by "best management practices" and the adoption of "Best Management Plans". We have significant concerns about approving a development with identified environmental risks based on an assumption that best management practices will be followed. There is little or no ability to ensure compliance with this commitment and so the risks associated with the project that have been discounted by the assumption that best practices will be followed are in fact very real risks that should be fully evaluated. At the recent Open House, Scott Burns responded to concerns about impacts on wildlife corridors and the neighbouring community by saying "it's our land, we'll do what we want." If this is the attitude of Burnco's senior management, it hardly gives confidence that Burnco is committed to best practices. Our concern in this regard is height ened by the experience of residents in the housing community adjacent to Burnco's aggregate mine at Cougar Ridge near Calgary, Alberta, where Burnco has declined to follow best practices or adopt mitigation strategies that would reduce the impact of its operations on neighbouring land owners. To simply dismiss potential risks by assuming that best management practises will be followed is unacceptable particularly when there is little or no ability to enforce the use of best practices once the project has been approved.

9. The EIS contains little evaluative data on what the impact of the project will have on adjoining land values. The residents of the McNab strata development immediately adjacent to the project site will be the most directly impacted. Anecdotal evidence is that since Burnco announced its development plans, property values for McNab Valley residents have plummeted. One realtor who is knowledgeable in the market has commented that if the project proceeds the McNab properties will likely be worth a fraction of their former value, if they will even be saleable at all. Since Burnco's development plans were announced, the spectre of a gravel mine being built has dampened the market considerably and our development has experienced a similar, though less pronounced, decline in value of the lots in our community. Burnco has not undertaken any proper evaluation or quantification of the cost impact that the project would have on neighbouring properties or the loss of property tax revenues that will result from the decreased land values.

10. The proponent downplays the current value of the McNab Creek area as salmon bearing habitat. However our experience in the last few years is that there has been a marked recovery in the salmon stocks. The analysis of the area from a fisheries perspective that has been provided by the proponent should be examined with great scrutiny. It certainly appears to us, and to others with historical knowledge of the area, that the McNab Creek environment is experiencing the same recovery that is being seen in the rest of Howe Sound and this project can only result in a severe set-back.

11. It is our understanding from speaking with the consultants at the recent open house, that the models used for noise and dust assessment are based on averaging the anticipated impact. This would seem to us to be inappropriate and would mask the true impact of the project. Any modelling should be based on the peak level operating conditions in order to properly assess what impact the project will have.

12. We are concerned about the impact of dust on the area. Burnco downplays this issue by claiming that the pit dredging will not create dust and that it will use covered conveyors. However the Air Quality analysis does show particulates spreading out into Thornbrough Channel. The area can be exposed to extreme winds and there often are in-flow or out-flow wind conditions that can be highly variable and undoubtedly will spread the particulates over an area that is larger than the average areas depicted in the presentations. These particulates will necessarily fall in the surrounding marine areas and settle as sediment. It is incongruous to us that the Air Quality report shows particulate impact over the marine areas yet the marine assessment blithely asserts that there will be no sediment created by the operations and discounts any impact to the marine environment based on this assumption of no sediment being created. It seems that the proponent has not even considered its own assessment results developed in one context when reporting on another area of impact.

13. It is very surprising to us that Burnco views the risk of flooding or debris flow as negligible. The McNab Valley is known for its heavy rainfalls and McNab Creek is rated as a high velocity creek. Log and debris dams and resultant debris floods are common in the Howe Sound region with Environment Canada's website recognizing Howe Sound as a hazard area for debris floods. A paper by Andree Blais-Stevens (Geological Survey of Canada) and Oldrich Hungr (Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of BC) states that over the last 150 years, hundreds of landslide events have been reported in the Sea to Sky Corridor with landslide activity peaking at approximately 40 events per decade in the 1980's and 1990's. They also note that almost 18% of all of Canada's landslide deaths have occurred in the Sea to Sky Corridor. Based on this type of readily available information regarding the risks of debris flows or flooding and our own experience from living in the region , it is baffling to us to see that Burnco's assessment concludes that any risk in this regard is negligible without any explanation as to how the conclusion has been reached or substantiated.

14. This project will result in increased barge traffic in the area based on average levels of vessel traffic in Howe Sound. The report concludes that the impact will not be significant based on overall vessel traffic in the region. However this area is home to two recreational boaters' outstations and is extensively used by recreational boaters, kayakers and others. This small vessel activity includes frequent travel in canoes or kayaks by children from the neighbouring camps. The barge routes also directly transect the new marine trail which runs along the east side of Gambier Island and through the McNab Creek vicinity. This route is expected to attract a large number of canoeists, kayakers and other boaters. The small vessel traffic in this area will continue to increase, perhaps dramatically, on an ongoing basis. The study does not properly address the nature and volume of the vessel traffic in the localized area and the potential safety impact tha t increased barge traffic could have, particularly in the summer months.

We are very concerned about the significant negative impacts that this project will have on the communities in Howe Sound, residents of Metro Vancouver and on tourism and recreation in the region. The project poses clear environmental risks as well as significant economic, social, heritage and health effects while providing little benefit to the economy or communities of the region. There will be significant social and economic costs borne by neighbouring communities and the general public that have not been factored into the impact assessment that has been submitted by Burnco.

We fail to see how the goals of environmental, economic and social sustainability for Howe Sound can be achieved if this project receives approval. We can only hope that the responsible authorities will recognize the true value of McNab Creek and the Howe Sound region and will not let the bottom line priority of one Alberta company outweigh the interests of the citizens of British Columbia.

If this project is approved, which would be a travesty, then there must be enforceable conditions imposed which ensure that the scope of the operation is not extended beyond what has been represented in the EIS. To fail to strictly enforce the representations and commitments made in Burnco's proposal or to allow any subsequent amendments which could result in an expanded scope or extended operating hours would make a mockery of the process.

Proper safeguards need to be imposed to ensure that the characterizations used for the purposes of this application are honoured in practice. The proponent should be required to grant restrictive covenants in favour of McNab Creek Estates, our Strata Corporation and the yacht clubs (all of whom will be dramatically impacted by this proposal) which include operating restrictions consistent with the representations made in this application. It is only through registered covenants in favour of the adjoining land owners that the representations and commitments given in the approval process can be properly monitored and enforced.

Yours truly,

DOUGLAS BAY STRATA CORP, BSC 1539

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

No Gravel mine on Howe Sound! Protect supernatural BC. Protect species living in Howe Sound!

Kevin W Davie - Sechelt, British Columbia

The Burnco gravel mine should be approved with no more stringent standards than three other gravel extraction operations have. Gravel is certainly needed mostly use on the Lower Mainland for construction. This location will result in less GHGs released than trying to bring in other gravel from sources farther away.

Albert Roos - North Vancouver, British Columbia

As a frequent boater on Howe Sound for the past 20 years, I have seen enormous improvements in the Sound's marine wildlife population. Where once it appeared nearly "dead", whales are now frequently seen, as are Pacific White Sided Dolphins. Recreational fishing has rebounded. The McNab Creek estuary is a vital part of the marine ecosystem in this area. Burnco's proposed gravel pit site is ludicrous. on a simple cost vs. benefit analysis, we have a gravel operation employing a few people on the one hand vs. the health of a major recreational area and tourist attraction located minutes from a metropolitan area of almost 3 million people (and growing). We have one chance to make the correct decision. Burnco's application should be denied.

Barry Haynes - Gibsons, British Columbia

I have walked McNab creek extensively. It is a important salmon run. We don't want this Burnco project in howe sound. It will destroy a beautiful area that is recovering well from previous human destruction. Please do not approve this project!!!

Allison Redding - Squamish, British Columbia

Please do allow Burnco to move forward with there development plans. You must consider the estuary at McNab Creek, including the Salmon, and other at danger species. As well as the need for more aggregate in this region. Please cosider that there is not enough data to do this environment assessment. Howe Sound is now a diverse and thriving ecosystem after surviving Brittannia Mines decades ago, as well as the other industry on the Sound. As a local resident please take all these really important issues into consideration.

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

A full cumulative assessment of the effects of industry in Howe Sound really needs to be done.

The geography of the Sound makes it a funnel for pollution, and even today we see a concentration of pollution from the Lower Mainland funnel up through Squamish on some Summer days.

The cumulative impacts assessment fails to take the impacts on Squamish from the BURNCO operations.

The cumulative impacts assessment fails to address the additional impacts from the proposed Mt. Mulligan compressor (run on natural gas).

Mt. Garibaldi has also been excluded, and yet it represents a significant addition to regional traffic (pollution) and thus Howe Sound pollution.

An air quality assessment needs to consider how pollutants travel in the whole Sound, and the cumulative impacts of all major projects.

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

The application does not seem to address the approved Woodfibre LNG cooling system. Cetaceans and fish alike travel the whole Sound. Although these facilities have distance between them, they represent a growing collection of stresses on fish, marine mammals, and other wildlife that travel the whole Sound.

The cumulative stress needs to be addressed. We're not dealing with goldfish that stay confined to a little bowl.

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

The application seems to think that in terms of socio-economic impacts, BURNCO is too far from Woodfibre LNG to have any interaction. However, both facilities are in the Sea-to-Sky Corridor, and are all part of Howe Sound.

The many tourists travelling to Whistler experience the Sound as a contiguous area that has has a positive transition from over-industrialization in Vancouver - back to natural beauty in Howe Sound. Many new business and residents have arrived precisely because of this natural beauty.

A return of multiple significant industrial projects on Howe Sound should be evaluated for cumulative impacts, especially on tourism, and the region's natural brand.

An assessment that fails to recognize that all development in the Sound impacts the whole Sound is seriously flawed.

The assessment also makes absolutely no mention of the new compressor station planned for Mt. Mulligan which is again further re-industrialization of the area. Any significant shift in economic basis will have impacts, but these have not been addressed by the Environmental Impact Statement.

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

End-of-project remediation.

The compensation channel is an artificial structure which will likely not survive long after project's end.

Restoring the natural stream-way should be a firm end-state requirement.

Personal Information Withheld - Sunshine Coast, British Columbia

I am 100% against the Burnco Mine. The McNab Valley it too important to spoil with a gravel pit. Our family has been enjoying this incredible & unique area of Howe Sound since the 90's. Some of my most favorite memories were created at McNab Creek. Crabbing, fishing, wakeboarding, tubing, the list goes on and on. Future generations would miss out on so much if they allow an industry like a gravel pit to operate here; especially the wildlife! It's certainly not worth 12 jobs. No to Burnco!

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

Preservation of marine tourism and hiking access to the vicinity of McNab.

Moorages, anchorages, swimming facilities and back-country access have long been part of the McNab Creek area's attractions for Howe Sound visitors and local boating clubs.

The application fails to properly address how these local amenities will be protected. Neither does it propose how loss of these amenities will be compensated for. The Management Plan should address this issue.

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

There was an inconsistency between the job creation figures shown in 2 different slides in the Open Houses for BURNCO.

One showed about 300 person-years of employment (over 25 years). The other (derived from input-output analysis) showed person-year employment benefits several TIMES that amount.

This misleading discrepancy should be resolved by further analysis, and that section of the application re-submitted, with additional time allowed for public scrutiny and comment.

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

The job benefits analysis for BURNCO used the questionable input-output econometric model.

BURNCO has used input-output econometric analysis to predict the job creation benefits accruing to the project.

For resource projects, this is a highly questionable analysis technique. The Australian Institute has written a convincing argument highlighting the inadequacies of input-output analysis. See http://www.tai.org.au/sites/defualt/files/TB%2012%20The%20use%20and%20abuse%20of%20economic%20modelling%20in%20Australia_4.pdf)

(Input-output was used by the BC Government in arriving at its inflated job estimates for BC's LNG industry.)

Re-do the employment estimates and repost/allow additional time for public scrutiny and comments.

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

Barge traffic will diminish Howe Sound's recreational and tourism potential, and add to the cumulative traffic hazard in Howe Sound.

Shipping 1-4 million tonnes of aggregate annually from this location will make for 2-6 tug/barge movements daily through Southern Howe Sound. Routes would cross very busy sailing and small-boat recreational areas: significant recreational and small business boat traffic (that will only grow over time), the Howe Sound Marine Trail, ferry routes, the path of LNG tankers exiting from the Woodfibre LNG plant, and freighters from Squamish Terminals. This exponentially increases the risk of collisions and loss of life in a narrow waterway and diminishes the amenity and tourism use of the Sound. The cumulative effects and worst-case hazard analysis of this project have been underestimated by the Proponent.

A cumulative impact assessment, including loss of amenity and tourism value of the Sound, should be completed prior to deciding on this application. So too should a study of the increased hazards associated with increasing the large-vessel traffic in Howe Sound. Improvements to vessel tracking, buoys and channel markers in the area will be necessary.

Personal Information Withheld- Gibsons, British Columbia

Just don't do it!

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

The job benefits were analyzed on the basis of too narrow an RAA .

BURNCO currently sources its aggregate from Jervis Inlet, Port McNeil and Coquitlam. To gauge the benefits to the BC economy, the NET job creation figures (i.e. McNab's 12 jobs minus job losses at the above aggregate sources) as a consequence of allowing the McNab Creek operation must be considered.

If there is little or no net job gain to BC as a result of this proposal, it should be firmly rejected. Jobs in areas like Port McNeil are much harder to come by than in the Lower Mainland/ Howe Sound.

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

Advisory Committee of voluntary citizens.

In 2009 when a gravel quarry at McNab Creek was turned down by SCRD, one requirement by SCRD was an Advisory Committee of volunteer citizens to provide ongoing input with the goal of community acceptance of the project.

Require the formation of an Advisory Committee of volunteer citizens - as part of the proposal for this project.

Steve Dietrich - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Here is a great example of where the Howe Sound could be headed if looking at more positive industries down the road.

http://www.squamishchief.com/news/local-news/400-million-all-season-resort-in-works-1.2220168

This type of resort/investment ($400 Million) proposal does not come to many rural communities is Canada but is being proposed for Howe Sound! People are starting to recognize it's amazing beauty. Since the long process of cleaning-up after Britania, there are finally more sustainable recreation and resort proposals coming to the Howe Sound which will have so many more economic, sociological and environmental benefits to the region than a gravel mine!

Please consider a more positive future!!

Klahanie Point-Villas

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

Loss of property values in the nearby strata units.

The proponent claims little or no loss of value for nearby properties. This assertion is contradicted by many studies that have highlighted the loss of value (including the value associated with quiet enjoyment) at or near industrial sites adjacent to established residential areas.

Recent jurisprudence in BC has borne out the right of homeowners to receive compensation for that loss. See http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/grace-islet-controversy-ends-as-b-c-steps-in-to-buy-land-1.2906882

Fair market value compensation for loss of property value must form part of the economic analysis of any approval for this mine.

Peter Kowalczyk - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

End-of-project remediation

Experience in the BC mining industry has shown escalating costs of end of project remediation.

The compensation channel is an artificial structure which will likely not survive long after project's end. Restoring the natural streamway should be a firm end-state requirement. This should be funded by an enviromental bond established at the start of project, and assessed an increased during the project to ensure sufficient funds for proper remediation when the project ends.

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

First Nation consultation – Sechelt First Nation was omitted.

McNab Creek is in Sechelt traditional territory.

Squamish and Tseil-Waututh First Nations have been consulted re Burnco, but not the Sechelt First Nation.

The Sechelt First Nation wasn't consulted about the gravel quarry at McNab Creek in 2009 either, and this was part of SCRD saying no re a gravel quarry there in 2009.

Respect/consult with Sechelt First Nations re Burnco.

Peter Kowalczyk - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

Preservation of marine tourism , hiking access to the vicinity of McNab.

Moorages, anchorages , swimming facilities and back-country access have long been part of the McNab Creek area's attractions for Howe Sound visitors and local boating clubs.

The application fails to properly address how these local amenities will be protected.

These amenities have a real and calculable economic value and their loss will impact the local economy. The proposal does not identify how loss of these amenities will be compensated for. The Management Plan should address this issue.

Murray Skeels - Bowen Island, British Columbia

This project would provide gravel, a commodity readily available for extraction in a cost effective manner from many areas with quite low ecological values. This particular location is an extremely rich ecological area that will be destroyed by the project. Only those who place very, very little value on the natural world would even contemplate the possibility that the benefit to be obtained from this giant gravel pit would outweigh the cost to our environment.

Please reject this application.

Peter Kowalczyk - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

The job benefits were analyzed on the basis of too narrow an RAA.

BURNCO currently sources its aggregate from Jervis Inlet, Port McNeil and Coquitlam. To gauge the benefits to the BC economy, the net job creation figures (i.e. McNab's 12 jobs less the job losses at the above aggregate sources) as a consequence of allowing the McNab Creek operation must be considered.

If there is little or no net job gain to BC as a result of this proposal, it should be firmly rejected. Jobs in areas like Port McNeil are much harder to come by than in the Lower Mainland/ Howe Sound

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

Loss of property values in the nearby strata units.

The proponent claims little or no loss of value for nearby properties. This assertion is contradicted by many studies that have highlighted the loss of value (including the value associated with quiet enjoyment) at or near industrial sites adjacent to established residential areas. Recent jurisprudence in BC has borne out the right of homeowners to receive compensation for that loss.

See http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/grace-islet-controversy-ends-as-b-c-steps-in-to-buy-land-1.2906882

Fair market value compensation for loss of property value must form part of the economic analysis of any approval for this mine.

Peter Kowalczyk - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

Barge traffic will diminish Howe Sound's recreational and tourism potential and add to the cumulative traffic hazard in Howe Sound.

Shipping 1-4 million tonnes of aggregate annually from this location will make for 2-6 tug/barge movements daily through Southern Howe Sound,. Routes would cross very busy sailing and small-boat recreational areas, the Howe Sound Marine Trail and ferry routes, the path of LNG tankers exiting from the Woodfibre LNG plant and freighters from Squamish Terminals. This exponentially increases the risk of collisions and loss of life in a narrow waterway and diminishes the amenity and tourism use of the Sound. The cumulative effects and worst-case hazard analysis of this project have been underestimated by the Proponent. The Howe Sound airshed is restricted, pollution from this increased heavy tugboat traffice will impact everyone along the route.

A cumulative impact assessment, including loss of amenity and tourism value of the Sound, should be completed prior to deciding on this application. So too should a study of the increased hazards associated with increasing the large-vessel traffic in Howe Sound. Improvements to vessel tracking, buoys and channel markers in the area will be necessary.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

No no no. Please Stop this madness

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

The nearshore strip of forest cover is too narrow.

The strip of forest cover between the pit and the ocean is too narrow to be sustainable. Blowdown and salt water intrusion will threaten its existence.

For reasons of sustainability and visual camouflauge, increase the width of the ocean-pit separation strip, and lessen the size of the proposed pit and crushing area.

Wanda Nowicki - Gibsons, British Columbia

Too many environmental risks! PERIOD.

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

"Daytime Hours" of operation definition.

The Proponent advertises that the plant will operate only on weekdays, and during "daytime hours". Daylight hours vary seasonally, so the statement of "daytime hours" is very unclear.

Clearly define "daytime hours" in the proposal.

Personal Information Withheld - Gibsons, British Columbia

I aks you to reject the application as this proposal would locate a noisy, dusty gravel mine and crush mill next to an existing multi-residential area. Furthermore the project has (twice) been rejected by Fisheries & Oceans Canada because of the likely loss of salmon habitat in McNab Creek, and would endanger marine species.

Peter Kowalczyk - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

Loss of property values in the nearby strata units.

The proponent claims little or no loss of value for nearby properties. This assertion is contradicted by many studies that have highlighted the loss of value (including the value associated with quiet enjoyment) at or near industrial sites adjacent to established residential areas. Recent jurisprudence in BC has borne out the right of homeowners to receive compensation for that loss. See http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/grace-islet-controversy-ends-as-b-c-steps-in-to-buy-land-1.2906882

Fair market value compensation for loss of property value must form part of the economic analysis of any approval for this mine

Peter Kowalczyk - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

The nearshore strip of forest cover is too narrow The strip of forest cover between the pit and the ocean is too narrow to be sustainable.

Blowdown and saltwater invasion will threaten its existence

For reasons of sustainability and visual camouflage, Increase the width of the ocean-pit separation strip, and lessen the size of the proposed pit and crushing area

Peter Kowalczyk - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

"Daytime Hours" definition.

The Proponent advertises that the plant will operate only on weekdays and during "daytime hours". Daylight hours vary seasonally, but the definition of "daytime hours" is unclear

Clearly define "daytime hours" in the proposal

Peter Kowalczyk - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

Water quality is insufficiently characterized in the application.

Removing sediment in the water discharged into the ocean is critical to habitat protection, not least for the nearby eel grass beds and glass sponge reefs.

Siltation monitoring (both in the original and compensation channels and in the nearby ocean) , with periodic reporting of results that are auditable and accessible to the public , should be part of any approval of the project. Local authorities (eg. SCRD) should have the power to compel a reduction, suspension or cessation of mine activities where sediment/siltation exceeds pre-agreed norms

Peter Kowalczyk - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

Plant lighting.

The McNab area (and much of Howe Sound) is currently a dark zone, allowing residents visibility of the wonders of the night sky. Plant lighting will destroy this local value for much of the year.

Any approval must come with strict (and measurable) restrictions on lighting intensity and local dispersion. Local authorities (eg. SCRD) should have the power to compel a reduction, suspension or cessation of mine activities where light intensities exceed pre-agreed norms

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

Water quality is insufficiently characterized in the application.

Removing sediment from the water discharged into the ocean is critical to habitat protection, especially for the nearby eel grass beds and glass sponge reefs.

Siltation monitoring (in the original channel, compensation channels, and in the nearby ocean), with periodic reporting of results that are auditable and accessible to the public, should be part of any approval of the project. Local authorities (eg SCRD) should have the power to compel a reduction, suspension, or cessation of mine activities where sediments/siltation exceeds pre-arranged norms.

Kevin Manning

Howe Sound is still in recovery from major industry in the last century. This gravel mine is not needed or vital to our province or city region in any way but having a natural jewel so close to the urban centre is for our tourism industry. Please give the sound more time to recover and decline Burnco's application.

Peter Kowalczyk - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

The impact of marine noise is insufficiently studied in the application.

The impact of marine noise (from the conveyor belts –tugs, barge loading and water taxis) on cetaceans, herring, salmon (spawning adult and habituating juveniles) and other at-risk species (including waterfowl) is underestimated in the "science" work done by the Proponent.

Marine noise transmits 5-10 times farther & faster through water than through air. Marine noise should be carefully baselined and monitored in wide spatial and temporal dimensions around the site Periodic reporting of results that are auditable and accessible to the public should be part of any approval of the project. Local authorities (eg. SCRD) should have the power to compel a reduction, suspension or cessation of mine activities where marine noise exceeds pre-agreed norms

Peter Kowalczyk - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

Air quality, which will inevitably deteriorate in the vicinity of the mine, is insufficiently characterized in the application

There are no air quality (for dust, particulates) monitoring stations in the vicinity.

Air quality monitoring , with periodic reporting of results that are auditable and accessible to the public , should be part of any approval of the project. Local authorities (eg. SCRD) should have the power to compel a reduction, suspension or cessation of mine activities where air quality falls below pre-agreed norms

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

Please, please, please do not let the gravel mine become a reality. I currently live in Lions Bay and have grown up in Howe Sound my entire life. This beautiful part of BC should be a national marine park not some industrial endeavour.

Peter Kowalczyk - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

Sightline, noise and dust:

The proposed mine is far too close to existing residential properties The McNab Creek strata title properties are well within 500' of the proposed mining operations

Because of unsightliness, the adverse effects on property values, noise and dust issues, gravel mining operations are generally not allowed within 1000' of any residential property. Other BURNCO properties have had 1,000' separation zones stipulated as conditions of their licenses to operate. Example: BURNCO property in Parkland County, Alberta. See http://www.parklandcounty.com/Assets/Governance/Subdivision+and+Development+Appeal+Board+Minutes/SDAB+Minutes+Jan+21.pdf

Because of the confined topography of the area, mitigation of these damaging effects is impractical. Should full compensation for loss not be acceptable to local homeowners, this mine should not be approved

Personal Information Withheld - Eastbourne,Keats Island, British Columbia

I am opposed to Burnco's McNab Creek mine proposal. I find their presentation unconvincing. The mine would be the last blow to a habitat already degraded by long term logging.

This estuary is the last large undeveloped one on the Sound. It should be preserved and allowed to heal for the good of the marine and terrestrial wildlife as well as our ignorant human selves.

Peter Kowalczyk - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

The Fish Habitat offset plan may not work.

The Proponent has no experience operating aggregate mine in the marine environment (contrary to claims by the Project Manager, a mine near the Bow River in Calgary does not qualify as "marine"). The proposed "compensation channel" is key to attempts to mitigate the loss of fish habitat in this project. Should it fail, even partially, accountability and compensation for the loss should be automatic.

Any approval of this proposal should include a contingency bond to fund maintenance of the new streamway, an overflow gate from the pit lake, and a fully-funded alternate solution should the offset plan fail. The bond should also be sufficient to cover site remediation at end-of-project

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

Plant and dock lighting

The McNab Creek area (and much of Howe Sound) is currently a dark zone, allowing residents visibility of the wonders of the night sky. Plant and dock lighting will destroy this local value for much of the year.

Any approval must come with strict (and measurable) restrictions on lighting intensity and local dispersion. Local authorities (eg SCRD) should have the power to compel a reduction, suspension or cessation of mine activities where light intensities exceed pre-arranged norms.

Peter Kowalczyk - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

Unsuitable location.

This proposal would locate a noisy, dusty gravel mine and crush mill next to an existing multi-residential area

In 2009 SCRD said no to a permit for an aggregate operation at McNab Creek. There was concern re noise and dust from onsite crushing, sorting, weighing, and stockpiling, all of which Burnco plans to do. Why allow these activities now? To do so would represent atrocious planning, with little/no obvious compensating factors. It should not be permitted.

Peter Kowalczyk - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

21 species officially at risk from Burnco.

Burnco's consultants documented that the gravel quarry could be home to 21 species officially at risk. This includes Roosevelt elk , re-introduced to McNab Creek in 2001 by the BC Ministry of the Environment.

The Precautionary Principle, properly applied, should see this proposal firmly rejected.

Peter Kowalczyk - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

Insufficient data for at-risk species baselines.

For several key aquatic and land-based species (such as anadromous salmon, resident cutthroat trout and Roosevelt elk), population data was collected over far too narrow a timespan to be useful for establishing accurate baselines. Without accurate baselines, quantitative monitoring of the effects of this project will not be possible.

Part-year data is utterly insufficient to establishing accurate baselines. At least five years of data should be collected to afford accurate baselines usable for ongoing monitoring of effects on species populations and habitat. Local authorities (eg. SCRD) should have the power to compel a reduction, suspension or cessation of mine activities where habitat damage exceeds pre-agreed norms

Peter Kowalczyk - Bower Island, British Columbia

Loss of productive salmon habitat

The project has (twice) been rejected by Fisheries & Oceans Canada because of the likely loss of salmon habitat in McNab Creek. In a year of disastrous returns to the Fraser and other runs, this proposal is ill-timed and ill-advised

The Precautionary Principle, properly applied, should see this proposal firmly rejected.

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

The impact of marine noise is insufficiently studied in the application.

The impact of marine noise (from the conveyor belts - tugs, barge loading and water taxis) on cetaceans, herring, salmon (spawning adult and habituating juveniles) and other at-risk species (including waterfowl) is underestimated in the "science" work done by the Proponent.

Marine noise transmits 5-10 times farther & faster through water than through air. Marine noise should be carefully baselined and monitored in wide spatial and temporal dimensions around the site. Periodic reporting of results that are auditable and accessible to the public should be part of any approval of the project. Local authorities (eg SCRD) should have the power to compel a reduction, suspension, or cessation of mine activities where marine noise exceeds pre-arranged norms.

Harriet Hunter - Gibsons, British Columbia

I definitely oppose the Burnco Aggregate Project. The fragile recovery of Howe Sound should not be a site of re-industrialization but should be a protected environment for marine life and human habitation. The company's application does not show us that it is committed to careful management of its mining and processing operations in order to protect the surrounding marine and human environments.

Peter Kowalczyk - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

Regional demand for additional aggregate is not demonstrated

The Vancouver market requirement for an additional gravel aggregate source is not supported by the proponent's documentation. A greater profit margin for the Proponent should not be grounds for destroying the estuary of McNab Creek.

A supply/demand report showing strong evidence of the need for supply from this location (and the unavailability of supply from established locations), such as has been done for the Okanagan region, should be prepared before considering a permit for this project. See https://www.regionaldistrict.com/media/112368/2013_11_08___Full_Report___Aggregate_Supply_and_Demand_Update_and_Analysis.pdf

Personal Information Withheld - Gibsons, British Columbia

I am against the approval of the Burnco Aggregate Project. I do not want to see this region become re-industrialised as it has taken 25 years for Howe Sound to return to being a viable ecosystem with the food chain returning from plankton on up to whales. That is the result of the closure of the Britannia Mine and its toxic consequence on Howe Sound. Why on earth would we want to jeopardize that return? I believe this mine would contribute to the decline of the region's waterways. I believe that tourism and its spinoffs benefit a far broader chunk of the population and is preferable than 12 supposed jobs created by the proposed project with all of the money going to Burnco. I am not against mining. I am against this particular project as I believe it is a poor fit for the region and the small community near the mine at McNab Creek.

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

Air quality, which will inevitably deteriorate in the vicinity of this mine, is insufficiently characterized in the application.

There are no air quality (for dust, particulates) monitoring stations in the vicinity.

Air quality monitoring, with periodic reporting of results that are auditable and accessible to the public, should be part of any approval of the project. Local authorities (eg SCRD) should have the power to compel a reduction, suspension, or cessation of mine activities where air quality falls below pre-agreed norms.

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

Sightline, noise and dust: The proposed mine is far too close to existing residential properties.

McNab Creek strata title properties are well within 500' of the proposed mining operations.

Because of unsightliness, adverse effects on property values, and noise/dust issues, gravel mining operations are generally not allowed within 1000' of any residential property. Other BURNCO properties have 1000' separation zones stipulated as conditions of their licenses to operate. Example: BURNCO property in Parkland County, Alberta. See:

http://www.parklandcounty.com/Assets/Governance/Subdivision+and+Development+Appeal+Board+Minutes/SDAB+Minutes+Jan+21.pdf

Because of the confined topography of the area, mitigation of these damaging effects is impractical. Should full compensation for loss not be acceptable to local homeowners, this mine should not be approved.

Personal Information Withheld - West Howe Sound-Granthams Landing, British Columbia

I am totally opposed to this gravel mine in a key salmon estuary in biologically sensitive Howe Sound. For God's sake, the whales and dolphins are just coming back! Give nature a chance!

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

The fish habitat offset plan may not work.

The proponent has no experience operating an aggregate mine in a marine environment. Contrary to claims by the Project Manager, a mine near the Bow River in Calgary does not qualify as "marine". The proposed "compensation channel" is key to attempts to mitigate the loss of fish habitat in this project. Should it fail, even partially, accountability and compensation for the loss should be automatic.

Any approval of this proposal should include a contingency bond to fund maintenance of the new stream-way, an overflow gate from the pit lake, and a fully-funded alternate solution should the offset plan fail. The bond should also be sufficient to cover site remediation at end-of-project.

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, Howe Sound, British Columbia

McNab Creek is an unsuitable location for a gravel quarry.

This proposal would locate a noisy, dusty gravel mine and crush mill next to an existing multi-residential area.

In 2009 SCRD said no to a permit for an aggregate operation at MdNab Creek. There was concern re noise and dust from onsite crushing, sorting, weighing, and stockpiling, all of which Burnco plans to do.

Why allow these activities now?

To do so would represent atrocious planning, with little/no obvious compensating factors. It should not be permitted.

Trevor Boudreau - Vancouver, British Columbia

Burnco has done a good job responding to initial concerns and making changes to its plans in this revised application. I support moving forward with this project - as long as its operations can be done in a sustainable manner and environmental impacts can be mitigated. I also trust in the guidance of the Squamish First Nation upon whose traditional lands this project would be built.

Theodora Carroll - Squamish/Howe Sound, British Columbia

I am against the Burnco Aggregate Project. It is the wrong type of project for Howe Sound in terms of its environmental impacts on land, sea/water, and air, and on both marine and terrestrial biodiversity. Economically it is wrong and will severely undermine the fast growing, vibrant tourism industry (along with all the huge tanker traffic associated with the equally bad project, Wood Fibre LNG). Healthwise for humans (and other creatures) it is an unwise and detrimental project. Finally it contributes to climate change and is not warranted. Given the magnificence and uniqueness of Howe Sound, and that it is being proposed as a UNESCO Heritage area, it is a pity that the BC Government and the Federal Government are being so short-sighted in likely approving this project - on the basis of very limited short-term (dollar) gain for very long (environmental, biodiversity, health, and tourism) gain. The majority of Howe Sound residents/citizens and municipalitie s have demonstrated clearly that they are against this project and it is hoped that for once the BC and Federal governments will listen to the majority rather than a very limited minority. Do NOT approve BurnoCo Aggregate Project.

Martin Kukla - Vancouver, British Columbia

I am strongly oposing Burnco Aggregate Mine project. I think that we all live in 21st century where we all realize how important is to protect the enviroment we live in. Such a beautiful place is a gift to us and we should look after it. No more digging, logging and mining is needed. We don't have to develop every single place on earth.

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

The Howe Sound which is on the southeast of the Strait of Georgia, and extends 42 kilometres to its head at Squamish with its beautiful network of fjords, is an amazing wilderness enjoyed by all locals and visitors alike, with unspoilt marine wildlife.

At McNab Creek valley which is located in the middle of the Howe Sound, is where Burnco is proposing to develop a 74+ acre pit, build an onsite crushing and processing plant, and produce 20+ million tonnes of aggregate per year over 16 + years. The project will create only 12 direct jobs.

To whose benefit is this proposed mine? To the:

  • prawns, scallops, oysters, rock-fish, salmon and countless other types of marine life that exist in the Howe Sound and at McNab Creek?
  • recreational crabbing, prawning, fishing, and natural oysters beds, among many other forms of wildlife that is enjoyed by all around this area?
  • Over $300 million that Burnco will profit from by having 12 employees on site? Will it, in the long term benefit of indirect and direct jobs within the recreation building and tourism markets due to negative effects of the mine? Or just Burnco?
  • To the numerous eagles nests that live in the McNab Creek area. Is it a benefit to their young that are protected under BC's laws and are sensitive to noise created by Burnco project?
  • population of Roosevelt Elk that were transplanted to McNab Creek by the BC Ministry of Environment in the early 2000's?

As you can see the benefit is clearly to Burno. We need to speak for the future of all related to the Howe Sound Ecosystem and for those who cannot speak and act and ensure they protected and put a stop to the Burnco proposed aggregate mine at McNab Creek.

Kevin Mizuno - Vancouver, British Columbia

This needs to STOP!! We need to think more about the beauty of BC and the Environmental impact, then a gravel mine!!

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Howe Sound has been through tough times and is finally living some of its former glory. With the closure of Woodfibre and Britannia Mine clean up efforts, species are returning to live, love, give birth, and play here. I worked in this are in the 80s and the beaches and intertidal and subtidal zones were a wasteland. Today I seen the return of rockfish, pipefish, greenlings, seaperch,salmon, steelhead and marine mammals such as seals, porpoises, dophins, and Orcas. Let us now continue our caring, connection, and stewardship of Howe Sound. Let's speak up for those beings who cannot. No gravel pit should be a part of the Sound. If you could ask the more than humans who make this place their home, they would agree. Thank you.

Vel Anderson - Gibsons, British Columbia

It would be appreciated,if someone would kindly produce for the public, the missing information in this correspondence listed under 'McNab Piping Risk'

at http://a100.gov.bc.ca/appsdata/epic/html/deploy/epic_document_355_40820.html

DATE June 13, 2014 REFERENCE No. 091-416-0004/4000 TO Don Chorley CC Alan Calder FROM Willy Zawadzki, Richard Butler EMAIL rbutler@golder.com GEOTECHNICAL ASSESSMENT RISK OF PIPING DUE TO CHANGES IN GROUNDWATER SEEPAGE GRADIENTS PROPOSED GRAVEL PIT, MCNAB CREEK

2.0 CRITICAL GRADIENT AND POTENTIAL RISK OF PIPING The results of numerous gradation analyses of the natural soils at the proposed gravel pit are presented in the Concrete Aggregate Assessment report 09-1416004/4000 dated April 13, 2012 and a typical plot of these ???

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

I am opposed to the proposed Burnco project at McNab Creek. Howe Sound is only now recovering from decades of heavy industrial use. Let's not go backward on this recovery. The environmental impacts of the proposed project are simply too great to be justified for the use proposed. Howe Sound is not an appropriate location for this type of industrial activity.

I support the creation of a long term comprehensive land and water use plan for economic and social activities in the region that are compatible with sustainable uses of Howe Sound.

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

I am strongly against the Burnco gravel mine. It will threaten the McNab estuary and create a lot of pollution in Howe Sound. Please prevent this terrible project from going ahead.

Personal Information Withheld - Gibsons, British Columbia

I am against the gravel mine because it poses risks to wile salmon.

Personal Information Withheld - Lestock, Saskatchewan

Please review application for EPA.we want to preserve all natural space this place provides.

John Preissl - Burnaby, British Columbia

Hi EAO,

I am a stream keeper and Environmental photographer from Burnaby who has spent a lifetime hiking, fishing, photographing and exploring the Squamish area and Sound. I am also of Squamish and Leq a mel Nation ancestry. As a stream keeper for many years I have serious concerns with Burnco and a proposed large gravel mine just above the McNab Creek Estuary and literally in the direct watershed of this almost pristine watershed.

The one issue that I am very educated and familiar with is sediment/silt issues in rivers, creeks and streams and how that can seriously harm and or kill juvenile and adult Salmon. You may have seen much of the media I have done lately and over the years with these serious issues in our Salmon creeks in Burnaby and my oil spill photos the past few years in the Vancouver Sun and other media outlets.

I am working with some of the larger environmental groups and Salmon groups to help with these sediment/silt issues and large developments in and around Vancouver. Sediment and silt is a huge problem for Salmon, Cutthroat Trout and all other fish species year round and not just in the spawning season. It is also devastating for the sea life in the general area.

I am firmly opposed to this gravel mine and I am hoping it will be stopped dead in it's tracks ASAP. We only recently have the orcas, humpbacks, Dal's porpoise and pacific whited sided dolphins returning due to the herring and anchovies returning in this fragile sound. Let us keep it that way.

I will be doing a full photo tour of the entire area of the creek and estuary in the coming weeks to photo document this amazing salmon watershed area.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

Estuaries are fragile and provide vital habitat for flora and fauna, including salmon and many other species at risk. The return of cetaceans to Howe Sound in recent years is dependent on the health of Howe Sound waters, and estuaries such as McNab Creek contribute to Howe Sound's overall health. A gravel mine in such an delicate ecosystem will affect not only flora and fauna in the estuary itself, but also others dependent on these species, as well as the experience of those who recreate in these areas. Please don't risk the improved health of species in this area with the Burnco Aggregate Project. As someone who lives in this area because of its beautiful and healthy landscape, and has seen the Sound's return to health in recent years, I understand the importance of healthy surrounding land and waters as vital to the health, growth, and popularity of the Sunshine Coast, Squamish and the Lower Mainland as well.

Rob - Squamish, British Columbia

No!!!

Amanda - Bowen Island, British Columbia

DO NOT destroy McNabb creek!!! This is so short sited. The marine life that has finally had a chance to return to Howe Sound, should never be threatened again. Money won't buy the planet back once we destroy it!!!

Glen Allan Stein - Squamish, British Columbia

It's a destructive industry, mo matter where the companies want to locate their mine. I'm totally against any and all mining operations allocated for here in the Howe Sound. I am a full time Squamish resident. We don't want any LNG facilities here either, so don't feel we're pinpointing your mining operation.

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Please post the attached file as the submission from My Sea to Sky. We are an organization of thousands of local citizens dedicated to the protection of Howe Sound for this and future generations of British Columbians. We see no benefit to local communities in the Burnco application. Rather, this project will significantly damage the local environment, degrade the tourism and recreational economy of Howe Sound, and destroy irreplaceable salmon habitat restored at public expense in the wake of a past era of careless destruction. We are firmly opposed to granting this application

My Sea to SkyMy Sea to SkyMy Sea to SkyMy Sea to SkyMy Sea to SkyMy Sea to Sky

Cheryl Wozny - Lions Bay, British Columbia

Dear Reviewers,

I believe the Burnco Aggregate Mine Project should not be allowed to proceed based on a long list of items. They include the following:

Health

Sightline, noise and dust: The proposed mine is far too close to existing residential properties and the McNab Creek strata title properties are well within 500' of the proposed mining operations. Because of the confined topography of the area, mitigation of these damaging effects is impractical.

Noise - The impact of marine noise is insufficiently studied in the application.

The amount of noise generated by the crushing facility and mining operation on a consistent basis, will create Noise health effects.Marine noise transmits 5-10 times farther & faster through water than through air. Health consequences of regular exposure, to consistent elevated sound levels, from the new noise generated by this facility, is known to cause cause hearing impairment, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, annoyance, and sleep disturbance.

Air Quality including dust - Dust and particulate matter generated from the crushing facility and mining operation will impact the health of residents of the Howe Sound region. These harmful allergens can trigger allergic reactions and asthma in many people. Air quality, which will inevitably deteriorate in the vicinity of the mine, is insufficiently characterized in the application.

Water Quality is insufficiently characterized in the application. Removing sediment in the water discharged into the ocean is critical to habitat protection, not least for the nearby eel grass beds and glass sponge reefs. Siltation monitoring should be part of any approval of the project. Local authorities (eg. SCRD) should have the power to compel a reduction, suspension or cessation of mine activities where sediment/siltation exceeds pre-agreed norms

Economy
Howe Sound directly contributes hundreds of millions of dollars of revenue from tourism, entertainment and commercial fishing industries. The Burnco Aggregate Mine Project will reduce this revenue significantly and not provide corresponding off setting revenue for the losses incurred.

Also, Regional demand for additional aggregate is not demonstrated. A greater profit margin for the Proponent should not be grounds for destroying the estuary of McNab Creek.

The amount of noise generated by the crushing facility and mining operation on a consistent basis will lower the property value of homes located in the area including Lions Bay, Furry Creek, the proposed Porteau Cove housing development, Gambier Island, Anvil Island, Britania Mines and of course McNab Creek.

Dust and particulate matter generated by the crushing facility and mining operation will increase health costs to BC Taxpayers.

Wakes from commercial barge traffic will increase insurance claims and Barge traffic will diminish Howe Sound's recreational and tourism potential and add to the cumulative traffic hazard in Howe Sound.

The job benefits were analyzed on the basis of too narrow an RAA and the analysis used the questionable input-output econometric model. BURNCO currently sources its aggregate from Jervis Inlet, Port McNeil and Coquitlam. To gauge the benefits to the BC economy, the net job creation figures (i.e. McNab's 12 jobs less the job losses at the above aggregate sources) as a consequence of allowing the McNab Creek operation must be considered. If there is little or no net job gain to BC as a result of this proposal, it should be firmly rejected. Jobs in areas like Port McNeil are much harder to come by than in the Lower Mainland/ Howe Sound.

Environment
Ground water pollution from the mine will have a negative environmental impact on the region and in Howe Sound.

The mine will create risks to Wildlife Safety including impacting of rare birds and protected species and disturbance of terrestrial vegetation unique to the area.

Loss of productive salmon habitat, that will be impacted negatively from mining a pristine estuary. The project has (twice) been rejected by Fisheries & Oceans Canada because of the likely loss of salmon habitat in McNab Creek. In a year of disastrous returns to the Fraser and other runs, this proposal is ill-timed and ill-advised.

Marine resources such as killer whales, dolphins, crabs, and trout will all be negatively impacted from the noise and disturbance of the estuary.

Burnco's consultants documenting that the gravel quarry could be home to 21 species officially at risk. This includes Roosevelt elk, re-introduced to McNab Creek in 2001 by the BC Ministry of the Environment.

Social
The McNab creek region is a known as a tourism and recreation area. Introducing a mining operation will severely impact and change the use of the region. The mine will:

limit the recreational activities enjoyed on the water in front of the estuary limit if not stop the fishing and crabbing opportunities on the water in front of the area severely impact the recreational opportunities on Gambier Island directly across from the area the increase commercial barge traffic will create a hazardous situation for boaters, recreational kayakers and children on the water from the surrounding commercial kids camps

Also, the proposed mine is far too close to existing residential properties and the McNab Creek strata title properties are well within 500' of the proposed mining operations. Because of the confined topography of the area, mitigation of these damaging effects is impractical. Because of unsightliness, the adverse effects on property values, noise and dust issues, gravel mining operations are generally not allowed within 1000' of any residential property.

Cultural
There are several instances where historical first nations artifacts have been found in the region. Disturbing the estuary will limit, if not remove opportunities for archeological study.

Howe Sound is a centre piece jewel for Sea to Sky and BC tourism, including the growing number of visitors to the Whistler area. Culturally BC has positioned tourism around nature and the unparalleled spectacular environment. The mine, which is visible from the highway and which will be heard from the eastern shores of Howe Sound limits the cultural tourism opportunities already established in the region.

Other Heavy Industry Projects
The Howe Sound region this is not an industrial area as Bunco describes. Previous or incumbent rights should not have precedent. Currently there are a large number of heavy industry based projects that are applying for approval in the Howe Sound area including:

Run of River at McNab Creek

LNG at the former Woodfibre Site

Garbage Incineration beside the Port Mellon Sawmill Squamish Port Expansion A Pipeline in the Squamish Watershed to bring gas for the LNG plant A possible bridge to the Sun Shine Coast from either Porteau Cove

The Burnco project decision should take all projects listed into consideration when reviewing this application.

A Telling Tale
Sometimes speaking with the applicant and their consultants reveals the type of neighbour the applicant will be. The following quotes were received at the Burnco Open House held in Horsehoe Bay, in September 2016, from Burnco and Burnco representatives:

"It's my land and I'll do what I want with it." from Mr Burns, CEO of Burnco when he interrupted a private conversation about how the Burnco proposed gravel mine appears to be taking up the whole McNab Creek foreshore and encroaching on McNab Creek.

"Royalties from the project will be paid to another Burnco company" from Mr Burns, CEO of Bunco when asked about the revenue BC taxpayers should expect to receive from the Bunco proposed gravel mine at McNab Creek.

"I've never been to the Burnco proposed gravel mine site" Environmental consultant who was responsible for the Sound assessment and mitigation plan.

We ask you, Is this the type of company BC Taxpayers, the BC Government, Governments surrounding Howe Sound, First Nations and Sea to Sky residents/property owners want to be doing business with?

Pamela Fitzpatrick - Vancouver, British Columbia

Hon. Bill Bennett, MLA Sturdy, MLA Simons, MP Goldsmith-Jones

Please think of the big picture involved in this proposed mine decision. Now that Howe Sound is finally recovering from the toxic pollution caused by decades of heavy industry, it is time for a comprehensive plan for the area: one which respects and honours the major and sensitive ecosystems now coming back to life, as well as the needs of residents and tourists. Not just the mining wants.

Please do not allow this project to proceed; you will destroy an amazing natural resource.

Thank you.

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Howe Sound needs to stay beautiful. This is where we live, play, and rely on the TOURISM for the economy. I say no to this project.

Dr. Hugh Freeman - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Pure and simple. This is a proposal that will have a negative environmental impact on Howe Sound. Howe Sound has the potential for a world class marine conservation area that would produce lots of tourist-related income for a multitude of local companies and a beautiful educational resource for millions, so close to a world class city. Why waste this wonderful place on a gravel pit? It is time for the BC and federal governments to become serious about preserving this wonderful place.

Dave Hess - West Vancouver, British Columbia

Please do not approve the application for the Burnco Aggregate Project proposed for the Howe Sound estuary of McNab Creek. Mining gravel in McNab Creek would destroy the estuary and natural beauty of the area. This project would have devastating effects on fish habitat in the McNab estuary, as well as putting tonnes of effluent into the Howe Sound ocean currents. Mining activity would also cause disruption or destruction of the successful elk repatriation project being carried out in the area.

Environmental degradation should not be allowed for the benefit of mining gravel from the McNab Creek estuary. Further destruction of wildlife habitat and the environment of Howe Sound is unacceptable. Please protect our natural wildlife and resources. Please do NOT approve the Burnco Aggregate Project, either now or in the future. Thank you for considering these comments.

Mark Robichaud - Squamish, British Columbia

As an avid outdoorsman I am opposed to the Burnco Project for the reasons listed below. The impact of a an open pit gravel mine in the proposed location far exceeds the economic benefit of a private corporation

1. Why would anyone develop a gravel mine in Vancouver's ocean playground, an area of outstanding natural beauty? This is where an ever growing city comes to sail, dive, kayak, fish, camp and hike. Tourists flock from all over the world to see "SuperNatural, British Columbia", how would a gravel pit look in the tourism advertising?

2. Howe Sound is only now showing encouraging signs of environmental recovery after decades of industrial misuse. Should we now allow a reindustrialization of the area?

3. How can we consider developing a massive 77 hectare pit which will excavate the entire McNab estuary from one side of the valley to the other, completely eliminating one of only three river estuaries in Howe Sound, without developing an integrated, long term land and water use plan for the whole of Howe Sound?

4. The size of the gravel pit will limit access to the foreshore for wildlife such as elk, deer and bears who currently frequent the area to forage for food.

5. The excavation of the river estuary will dramatically change the movement of water through the valley and have a significant negative impact on the freshwater habitat.

6. The proposed mine developer, Burnco, filed a judicial review application against DFO in BC Supreme Court to 'strong arm' the DFO to allow them to proceed to an environmental review. The DFO have since agreed to that review with serious concerns as "the project presents a high risk to Salmon and Salmon habitat".

7. In addition to the destruction to fish habitat, Burnco's own consultants believe the mine site could be home to 21 species at risk including a population of Roosevelt Elk re-introduced to McNab Creek in 2001 by the BC Ministry of the Environment.

8. The noise from the gravel crushing facility and loading of barges will be significant. It will have a negative impact on the enjoyment of the area by boaters, kayakers, fishermen, tourists and other in Howe Sound. The mine developer has stated at meetings that if the demand is there, they want to run the mining and crushing facilities 24/7, 365 days a year.

9. Noise and light pollution will have significant negative impacts on the land and aquatic animals in the area. Noise and vibration pollution have been found to negatively impact the ability of marine mammals to communicate, navigate, find food and it is believed increasingly to impact their fertility.

10. The mine will have an impact on the economic potential of the Howe Sound area. There is considerable potential in Howe Sound to continue to grow the tourism industry with significant economic multipliers that would accrue to the local economy. A mine is not going to add to the beauty of the area.

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Approval of the Burnco proposal to place a gravel mine in the estuary at McNab Creek is a very bad idea for the marine environment, the residents in the area and the growing tourism industry.

Personal Information Withheld - West Howe Sound, British Columbia

How can Burnco remove 20 million tonnes of sand and gravel from the McNab River estuary and not damage the ecosystem? In my opinion, there is no way to remmediate. This project will damage the salmon spawning channel and will leave a big mess behind. Also, with rising sea levels, I question how long the berm between the gravel mine and the foreshore will last.

This is a relatively small gravel deposit and Burnco has other sources to mine. The value of this river estuary is in the salmon habitat it provides. Howe Sound is finally recovering after years of industrial activity. We are seeing the herring, salmon, dolphins and Orcas return.

This gravel mine is a regressive step backwards. I'm strongly opposed to this project.

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

Dear Reviewers,

I believe the Burnco Aggregate Mine Project should not be allowed to proceed based on a long list of items. They include the following:

Health
Noise - The amount of noise generated by the crushing facility and mining operation on a consistent basis, will create Noise health effects. Health consequences of regular exposure, to consistent elevated sound levels, from the new noise generated by this facility, is known to cause cause hearing impairment, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, annoyance, and sleep disturbance.

Air Quality including dust - Dust and particulate matter generated from the crushing facility and mining operation will impact the health of residents of the Howe Sound region. These harmful allergens—that can trigger allergic reactions and asthma in many people

Economy
Howe Sound directly contributes hundreds of millions of dollars of revenue from tourism, entertainment and commercial fishing industries. The Burnco Aggregate Mine Project will reduce this revenue significantly and not provide corresponding off setting revenue for the losses incurred.

The amount of noise generated by the crushing facility and mining operation on a consistent basis and the dust created from the facility, will lower the property value of homes located in the area including Lions Bay, Furry Creek, the proposed Porteau Cove housing development, Gambier Island, Anvil Island, Britania Mines and of course McNab Creek.

Dust and particulate matter generated by the crushing facility and mining operation will increase health costs to BC Taxpayers.

The Wave wakes from commercial barge traffic will create damage to properties along the shore as well as crown beaches/streams/shore lines which will increase insurance claims and premiums in BC

Environment
Ground water pollution from the mine will have a negative environmental impact on the region and in Howe Sound.

The mine will create risks to Wildlife Safety including impacting of rare birds and protected species and disturbance of terrestrial vegetation unique to the area.

Receiving fisheries, including salmon habitat, will be impacted negatively from mining a pristine estuary that is in recovery.

Marine resources such as killer whales, dolphins, crabs, and trout will all be negatively impacted from the noise and disturbance of the estuary.

Social
The McNab creek region is a known as a tourism and recreation area. Introducing a mining operation will severely impact and change the use of the region. The mine will:

  • limit the recreational activities enjoyed on the water in front of the estuary
  • limit if not stop the fishing and crabbing opportunities on the water in front of the area
  • severely impact the recreational opportunities on Gambier Island directly across from the area
  • new commercial barge traffic will create a hazardous situation for boaters, recreational kayakers and children on the water from the surrounding commercial kids camps

Cultural
There are several instances where historical first nations artifacts have been found in the region. Disturbing the estuary will limit, if not remove opportunities for archeological study.

Howe Sound is a centre piece jewel for Sea to Sky and BC tourism, including the growing number of visitors to the Whistler area. Culturally BC has positioned tourism around nature and the unparalleled spectacular environment. The mine, which is visible from the highway and which will be heard from the eastern shores of Howe Sound limits the cultural tourism opportunities already established in the region.

Other Heavy Industry Projects
The Howe Sound region this is not an industrial area as Bunco describes. Previous or incumbent rights should not have precedent. Currently there are a large number of heavy industry based projects that are applying for approval in the Howe Sound area including:

  • Run of River at McNab Creek
  • LNG at the former Woodfibre Site Garbage Incineration beside the Port Mellon Sawmill
  • Squamish Port Expansion
  • A Pipeline in the Squamish Watershed to bring gas for the LNG plant
  • A possible bridge to the Sun Shine Coast from either Porteau Cove

The Burnco project decision should take all projects listed into consideration when reviewing this application.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Please do NOT approve the aggregate project at the McNab Creek location. If such a mine is deemed necessary, please make sure it is sited in a less sensitive area. Too much GOOD environmental remedial WORK has been done in the Howe Sound area to allow for something that will almost certainly reverse previous damage. Thank you.

Personal Information Withheld - Garibaldi Highlands, British Columbia

Howe Sound is a beautiful place where people from around the world admire while travelling to Whistler or touring BC. A place of spectacular beauty and life.

It needs to be protected.

What if the city fathers so long ago decided to sell the now world famous Stanley Park to industry citing the need to keep the economy healthy? We would not have a world class city with the jewel of Stanley Park in it's crown. It would be just another waterfront city, not a spectacular place where the people are proud of their inheritance, a gift from the wise city fathers Please do not destroy Howe Sound with another scar on the landscape. Estuaries are a rare and special place with a unique ecological bioculture that needs protecting.

The Liberal legacy is already greatly tarnished. Don't make it worse.

Brian Gaffney - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Stop the proposed gravel mine in Howe Soundd

Linda Ruiz - Gibons, British Columbia

Howe Sound has recently undergone restoration from many years of industry. It is just coming back. This area is more valuable to tourism and fisheries than this proposed mine. This is not the place for a mine. There are too many irreparable hazards to the surrounding marine environment.

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver and Gambier, British Columbia

Why is it that after years of comments that we still are at this stage. This Burnco open pit mine doesn't belong in the Howe Sound. It has taken decades to get this area cleaned up for all of us in the Howe Sound using tax payer's funds. The many replies that get send to the EAO asking to not have this developed. I wonder if anyone even reads these as there hasn't been a single project that hasn't been approved.

This gravel mine benefits only Burnco and maybe 10 employees once finished. Tourism last year created more income to BC than any other industry. Let's think about what we are doing long term.

No No No Burnco in the Howe Sound.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

I am concerned with the approval process for this project for two reasons.

1. The proponent delivers all the evidence. However there is a wealth of educated and intelligent information material in the public domain that disputes many of the findings presented by the proponent. The proponent's representation of what will be destroyed and what will be remedied is in stark contrast to the public domain materials. Only a truly independent review - paid by the proponent but carried out by government appointed and independent experts - can truly determine impact, cost and benefit of the proposed wet mine.

2. A wet gravel mine is unusual for aggregate mining in British Columbia. It is a highly disruptive process and will negatively impact water quality, flora and fauna considerably. Burnco is an American company with little knowledge or interest in the sensitive environment of Howe Sound in general and the MacNabe Creek in particular. It is also understood that the low-cost wet mining process proposed will put the BC based aggregate producers under competitive pressure. It appears that the local sector will be put at a disadvantage. The questions then remain: Will there even be an economic net-benefit - ever - during the duration of the project; and if yes whose benefit will it be?

Michele Hall-McCaffrey - Gambier Island,British Columbia

I attended the Burnco Public Open House in West Vancouver and commend Burnco for the effort put into the materials and information and presentation. I am however, opposed to industrialization that impacts the foreshore and water resources of Howe Sound. I have been travelling Howe Sound by boat and water taxi for 24 years and have seen first hand the issues with development that impacts watersheds and streams and the very lengthy period of recovery time needed when these resources are impacted. I have also seen first hand what many other commenters have noted, an apparent but slow recovery of Howe Sound and the return of sea life that is notable and significant - whales and dolphins on a regular basis and primarily just the last 2-3 years. In my area, we have a salmon spawning creek that sees wildly varying returns of salmon annually. Howe Sound supports salmon and we need to be conscientious about how we manage the area.

While Burnco's plans for fish habitat between the future mine lake and the ocean seem adequate at first look, the protection of this habitat from mine lake overflow appears to depend on a dam gate and Golder consultants were unable to answer who would monitor and control this once the project was closed down. I suspect it would be the local government and paid for by us, the tax payers. This needs to be a factor that is determined up front. Too often we see the taxpayer on the hook after private industry has finished a project. The examples are numerous.

This area of Howe Sound is also subject extreme winter rains and heavy storms. Given this, I question whether the mine lake can be contained in such a way as to have no impact on McNab Creek.

The watersheds and major freshwater sources into Howe Sound have had enough industrialization what with Howe Sound Pulp and Paper, Woodfibre (now closed but under consideration for another major industrial project), water log booming (now discontinued but having long term impacts on ocean floor health), commercial activity at Squamish, and the severe problems caused by Britannia Mine that have cost taxpayers millions in cleanup.

Obviously aggregate is needed for the lower mainland however Howe Sound watersheds are not an appropriate source. Howe Sound has much more economic and social value by being able to support and improve marine life and stocks and as a world class recreational area within minutes of the city of Vancouver,

If for some reason, the government approves this project, I hope my concerns about the mine lake are closely and thoroughly examined and a future management plan is in place that will not land in the taxpayers lap. I also believe that if it is approved, it should only be permitted as a seasonal operation, that excludes the summer months and additionally should only operate at any time from Monday to Friday limited to 8 hours a day. The noise concerns mentioned by other commenters are very important and this application should not take precedence over, or compromise, existing users and landowners and campers (Camp Latona children's camp) and the enjoyment of their facilities and properties. I do want to reiterate however, that overall, I do not support further industrialization of Howe Sound.

I was driving through Princeton recently, an easy drive from Vancouver, and they are building mountains out of mining waste aggregate. Perhaps the focus should be on lowering the cost of transporting this to the lower mainland.

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

The Howe Sound is an incredibly sensitive environment. We have already made this mistake once in the past with the old Britannia Mine, and waste materials from the mine which were not properly dealt with leaked into the ocean and caused environmental devastation for years. It has only been recently that we have seen changes in the Howe Sound that mark it returning to a healthy state- whales such as orcas and dolphins are becoming more plentiful and venturing further in like they used too before the first mine. The reason we teach history in our schools is not only to give children perspective to the world around them, but to discourage the mistakes we made in the past. Please let the failures of the past warn and guide your actions of the future.

October 2, 2016

Vel Anderson - Gibsons, British Columbia

Burnco proposes environmental degradation to a huge riparian area. Modification of the riparian zone including bank erosion, direct destruction from heavy equipment operation, discharges from equipment and refueling, reduction in groundwater elevations, impacts on structures and access, disturbance to flora and fauna and all life forms, impacts on coastal processes.

The area encompasses many smaller streams which provide necessary nutrients to fish in the estuary. This project will wipe out a major feed source, which would harm or disturb lifeforms in the estuary. Increased sediment loads from the proposed new channels will be flowing to the estuary causing detrimental effect on marine lifeforms.

To disturb the McNab Creek riparian area would be extremely harmful to all life forms in the estuary including fish in the Sound. This project will do more harm than good.

As stated at Provincial site http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/industry/agriculture-seafood/agricultural-land-and-environment/water/riparian-areas/resources

"A riparian zone, or riparian area, is the interface between land and a river or stream. Although riparian areas make up only a small fraction of the land, they are among the most productive and valuable of all landscape types".

Therefore, let's keep this most productive and valuable McNab Creek riparian area undisturbed.

Peter Williamson - Bowen Island, British Columbia

The proposed gravel mine is completely incompatible with the recovery of Howe Sound from years of industrial pollution. Howe Sound is a great recreational and tourism resource on the doorstep of Vancouver. It is also the gateway to the Squamish-Whistler-Pemberton region which is of enormous importance to the tourism industry in British Columbia.

It should be protected for its scenic beauty, recreational use and environmental values. The proposed gravel mine is a threat to all of these.

I am deeply concerned about the impact of the mining operations on terrestrial wildlife in the MacNab Creek area, and the marine life at the mouth of MacNab Creek and in the wider Howe Sound.

The mining operations themselves will create light pollution, noise, sediment in the waters, destruction of the estuary, and will increase marine traffic in Howe Sound to an unacceptable level. There is likely to be a negative impact on commercial and recreational fisheries, as well as marine mammals which are now returning to Howe Sound.

There are many alternative sources of gravel and there is no justification proceeding with this project. There is minimal economic benefit to British Columbia, as a whole, and Howe Sound region, in particular.

I implore you not to allow this project to proceed.

Personal Information Withheld - Langdale, British Columbia

There cannot be any reason other than greed to disturb this beautiful, pristine coastal area and the ecosystem it supports.

John Adams - North Vancouver, British Columbia

We all cherish and celebrate the recovery of Howe Sound after decades of toxic pollution from heavy industry. BC taxpayers paid millions to clean up the Britannia mine in Howe Sound and now finally those actions, along with other conservation efforts, are paying off with the return of fish stocks, dolphins, orcas, whales and a proliferation of bald eagles and other wildlife.

Please bring to an end the proposed Burnco open pit mine before massive economic harm is caused to thousands of local residents and businesses including our film and tourism industries as well as countless dollars have been spent by both BC and Federal regulators evaluating whether the environmental destruction of a portion of this sensitive ecosystem can be "mitigated". We support the creation of a long term comprehensive land and water use plan for economic and social activities in the region that are compatible with sustainable uses of the Howe Sound.

We ask you, as our elected officials, to stop this ill-advised project that will destroy a portion of this amazing natural resource, all for the sake of the short term profits of a mining company.

Sunshine Coast Conservation Association - Sunshine Coast, British Columbia

Please see attachment for EA comments by Stamford Environmental Qualified Environmental Professionals - provided by the Sunshine Coast Conservation Association.

Sunshine Coast Conservation AssociationSunshine Coast Conservation AssociationSunshine Coast Conservation Association

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

This letter is being submitted regarding your request for public comment on the Environmental Impact Statement submitted by Burnco Rock Products's proposed open pit mine at the McNab Creek estuary.

Submission

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

THIS PROJECT HAS BEEN DENIED TWICE BEFORE. HAVING SPENT BILLIONS OF TAX PAYERS DOLLARS TO CLEAN UP OUR SOUND AFTER COPPER MINE AND WOODFIBRE DISASTERS WHY WOULD YOU EVEN THINK, OR ALLOW A GRAVEL PIT TO BE ALLOWED HERE...YOU WOULD BE COMPLETE IDIOTS TO DO SO AND WILL HAVE A LOT OF QUESTIONS AS TO WHY YOU ARE NOT PROTECTING OUR SALMON, HERRING, SPOT PRAWNS ETC.

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

McNab Creek estuary is a very special place. In fact, all of Howe Sound is a naturally spectacular place that should be preserved as a International Heritage Site. This is no place for a gravel pit. The long term economic befits derived from eco tourism would far surpass any benefit from the gravel pit. I have serious concerns that the environment assessment was not completed correctly and I urge you to not allow this proposed gravel pit to proceed.

Jackie Raymond - Vancouver, British Columbia

Our family owns property on Gambier Island overlooking the propose Burnco site, this could not only be detrimental to Howe Sounds marine life but to the beauty that this area possesses. We have waiting decades for the marine life to come back to the Howe Sound, please reconsider this proposition!

Carolyn Philip - New Westminister, British Columbia

Whenever we have visitors from out of town, we take them to Howe Sound to enjoy the spectacular beauty of the area. All of them are amazed that such a pristine and beautiful area exists so close to a major city. We have seen dramatic improvements in the marine ecosystem in the past ten years, can't believe this and the unspoiled scenery would be put at risk by a gravel pit. It's time we protected and promoted our beautiful environment rather than despoiling it. Protect the McNabb Creek Fish run, the Elk habitat, and the future supernatural tourism potential of Howe Sound. No to a gravel pit at McNabb Creek.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

The Burnco Aggregate Project proposed for McNab Creek area will seriously conflict with all the efforts of the past decades to nurse Howe Sound back to health. As a resident of Howe Sound I enjoy all the wildlife and the physical beauty of the sound and am dead against this project.

Michael Broughton - Lions Bay, British Columbia

The people of Howe Sound and the Sea to Sky region are values driven and have devoted time, money and energy to the clean up and remediation of Howe Sound, polluted and denigrated by poor industrial practice. To consider re-industrializing an area which has established itself as a destination for eco-tourism is unconscionable …. 12 jobs and ultimately a 76 acre gravel extraction lake makes no sense…..

The Sea to Sky Gondola employees dozens of employees, there are 12 employees at the Lions Bay General Store and Café, dozens more in Sewell's adventure boats bring excited, inspired and awestruck tourists to the beauty of Howe Sound, offering a complete ecosystem from healthy water for salmon to return to all the way to the spectacle of Orca's and larger whales breaching, fishing, and frolicking in Howe Sound.

Howe Sound and the Sea to Sky corridor is the playground and the oxygen of the lower mainland. To have an outdoor wonderland within minutes of a major metropolitan area is the envy of the world, and this must be protected.

Major, predominantly high-tech and future leaning firms that can establish virtually anywhere are coming to Greater Vancouver because their employees are values driven, they seek clean air, a healthy lifestyle, and quality life experiences for themselves and for their children. These are provided and supported by the Sea to Sky corridor.

This project is not needed to support our local or provincial economy, is destructive to other initiatives that support the reality that "the environment is the economy" and flies in the face of all the incredible work done by so many to restore the health and beauty of the region.

Sustainability has been described as a three legged stool, with economic, environmental and social augmented by cultural as a fourth component. This project is not sustainable, it fails on all four elements. The project takes more from than it gives the economy of the region, is environmentally irresponsible, and provides nothing and is destructive to the social and cultural fabric of our region.

When the Village of Lions Bay gravel pit was in operation during the building of the Sea to Sky Highway Upgrade prior to 2010, the mining of the Lions Bay 'Brunswick' gravel pit could be heard across long distances within the community regularly. This noise created a regular disruption for many residents, both above and below and surrounding spanning distances well in excess of 500'.

There is gravel all over BC. It is egregious to consider mining in one of 3 estuaries in the most southerly fjord in North America. This is simply irresponsible. It takes away much needed jobs from its current gravel mining location in Port McNeill, and will take away jobs in the boating and eco-tourism industry in Howe Sound. This would be economically irresponsible.

As owner/operator of the Lions Bay General Store & Café, visitors from all over the world, comment daily on the beauty and pristine nature of Howe Sound, Howe Sound has been the 'driveway entrance' to Whistler but in recent years Squamish and the Squamish region has become the destination for outdoor adventure and tourism. The Sea to Sky Gondola has been an incredible draw and success in highlighting the beauty of Howe Sound. Tourists and locals alike no longer see the Sea to Sky Highway as a roadway to someplace else but as a destination and experience itself. This is Howe Sound.

The Vancouver market requirement for an additional gravel /aggregate source is not supported by the proponent's documentation. A greater profit margin for the Proponent should not be grounds for destroying the estuary of McNab Creek.

The project has (twice) been rejected by Fisheries & Oceans Canada because of the likely loss of salmon habitat in McNab Creek. In a year of disastrous returns to the Fraser and other runs, this proposal is ill-timed and ill-advised For several key aquatic and land-based species (such as anadromous salmon, resident cutthroat trout and Roosevelt elk), population data was collected over far too narrow a time span to be useful for establishing accurate baselines. Without accurate baselines, quantitative monitoring of the effects of this project will not be possible This proposal would locate a noisy, dusty gravel mine and crush mill next to an existing multi-residential area The Proponent has no experience operating aggregate mine in the marine environment (contrary to claims by the Project Manager, a mine near the Bow River in Calgary does not qualify as "marine"). The proposed "compensation channel" is key to attempts to mitigate the loss of fish habitat in this project. Should it fail, even partially, accountability and compensation for loss should be automatic.

The McNab Creek strata title properties are well within 500' of the proposed mining operations
Because of unsightliness, the adverse effects on property values, noise and dust issues, gravel mining operations are generally not allowed within 1000' of any residential property. Other BURNCO properties have had 1,000' separation zones stipulated as conditions of their licenses to operate. Example: BURNCO property in Parkland County, Alberta.

Moorages, anchorages , swimming facilities and back-country access have long been part of the McNab Creek area's attractions for Howe Sound visitors and local boating clubs BURNCO currently sources its aggregate from Jervis Inlet, Port McNeil and Coquitlam. To gauge the benefits to the BC economy, the net job creation figures (i.e. McNab's 12 jobs less the job losses in those areas) as a consequence of allowing the McNab Creek operation must be considered.

The EAO process provides the proponent the opportunity to address the concerns identified by the public in October 2013. This is unfortunate. They are saying less fish will die, they will screen more of the visual devastation, they will try to fix what they damage….. all of these responses are unacceptable in that the project is in the wrong place and is unacceptable as a concept for the region. The premise is wrong, it is unacceptable, in the wrong place, and no amount of mitigation will make it acceptable.

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

TO THE EAO ASSESSMENT OFFICE...

FROM THE PEOPLE IN LIONS BAY AND HOWE SOUND, WHO LIVE , WORK, AND BREATHE IN THE FRESH AIR HERE, WHO HAVE CHILDREN AND GRAND-CHILDREN HERE, WE WILL NOT ALLOW OUT BEAUTIFUL HOWE SOUND TO BE POLLUTED BY A GRAVEL MINING OPERATION WHICH HAS NO USE HERE.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Burnco Aggregate Project at McNab Creek, Howe Sound, BC

To: Environmental Assessment Office

I am writing to you in opposition to the wet gravel mine proposed for McNab Creek by Burnco.

Why would anyone mine an estuary in an area (Howe Sound) that is still recovering from earlier industrialization? This entire area, is the recreational area for Vancouver and the Lower Mainland, as such, has high tourism and ecological value. Because of intensive post-industrial remediation, we who live in Howe Sound are seeing the return of herring and anchovies and large mammals such as dolphins, sea lions and whales. I understand that a small population of elk have been re-established near McNab Creek and will be affected by a mine. Other indigenous animals will be cut off by the mine from the estuary.

Please, for all our sakes, turn down this application for a gravel mine on this important habitat.
Why would the province bother doing all the costly remediation work of Britannia Mines and other industrial sites to turn around and undo it by approving this proposal?

Thank you for your careful and attentive work protecting our home.

Star Morris - Squamish, British Columbia

I have attended open houses, presentations and reviewed the application on this Project.

I appreciate that Burnco has done their utmost to mitigate risks towards a sustainable project. However, I believe that, cummulatively, the risks outweigh the benefits and cannot support the Project.

I submit and concur with the specifics and attached comments.

Comments and Criticisms of the Mcnab Creek Aggregate Mine applicationComments and Criticisms of the Mcnab Creek Aggregate Mine applicationComments and Criticisms of the Mcnab Creek Aggregate Mine applicationComments and Criticisms of the Mcnab Creek Aggregate Mine applicationComments and Criticisms of the Mcnab Creek Aggregate Mine applicationComments and Criticisms of the Mcnab Creek Aggregate Mine application

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

JUDGING FROM ALL THE COMMENTS RECEIVED, I THINK IT'S FAIRLY CLEAR THAT MORE THAN 99% OF OUR LOCALS, AND OTHERS WHO HAVE VISITED THIS AREA, FROM ALL AROUND THE WORLD, ARE AGAINST THIS RIDICULOUS PROJECT. (MAY I REMIND YOU, FOR THE 3RD TIME) THEREFORE YOU HAVE NO REASON OR SOCIAL LICENCE TO APPROVE THIS PROJECT. IT WOULD BE A TOTAL TRAVESTY OF JUSTICE.

WE DO NOT NEED MORE NOISE, POLLUTION, EXTINCTION OF FISH HABITAT, HAVING TO WEAR DUST MASKS TO STOP EXTREMELY DANGEROUS CHRYSTALLINE SILICA MATERIALS ENTERING OUR LUNGS IN ORDER TO LIVE HERE DAY BY DAY. WILL FREE RESPIRATORS BE PROVIDED BY THIS COMPANY OR GOVERNMENT IF THIS PROJECT GOES AHEAD??

Brendas Broughton - Lions Bay, British Columbia

Submission to the Environmental Assessment Office, Victoria BC by Brenda Broughton, October 2nd, 2016

The Proposed Burnco Proposed Aggregate Project at McNab Creek in Howe Sound will lead to Land and Marine Environmental, Health, Economic, Social and Heritage degradation :

1.Environmental: Acid drainage, which is a bi-product of rock crushing will harm the prawn and scallop beds in front of the McNab Creek estuary and harm the salmon species within the estuary, from spawning successfully. Rock crushing releases sulphites that immediately mix with oxygen to become toxic acid drainage, which creates an unconscionable risk to sealife and is a retrograde step in the decades long recovery process.

2.Health Effects: Rock Crushing Dust creates fine particulate airborne waste that will enter and line the human lung. This poses a significant harm to human health and one assumes a risk to the health of both animal and sea life. The Vancouver Aquarium is actively charting the recovery of Howe Sound.

3.Economic, Mammal and Human Health, along with Social Effects: Noise will echo through the Howe Sound similar to the fog horns. The difference is that it will invade the serenity and harm the ecomony as a result. In addition, this noise level will likely be a deterent to marine mammals who have returned following several decades of recovery efforts in Howe Sound.

Hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent cleaning up Howe Sound from the Federal and Provincial Government and business such as Howe Sound Pulp and Paper. Those businesses who did not clean up, did not survive the world's scrutiny that demands responsible business stewardship.

This project represents IRRESPONSIBLE environmental, social, heritage, health and economic stewardship. It is a very poor business decision for the Province of BC.

4.Economic Effects: The visual vistas that Howe Sound presents is our Canadian and British Columbian right. Stanley Park would also have gravel and we would not consider mining Stanley Park. Howe Sound is a world renowned spectacular tourist attractant to Canada, British Columbia, and the Lower Mainland. Even if there was gold in Stanley Park, we would not mine it, as Stanley Park, like Howe Sound is the gold.

5.The 'Environment is the Economy' in Howe Sound: The Shell Fish Industry, the Film Industry, Tourism [fishing, power and sail boating, paddle boarding, kayaking], Cruise Ships, and Hiking with spectacular vistas and auditory serenity. These are family supporting jobs, requiring boats, life jackets, fishing rods, paddle boards, kayaks, fishing boats, cruise ships, film crews, actors.

The vistas bring people from all over the world who home office which brings industry through jobs to Howe Sound from all over the world with Tax filings in BC. 2010 Olympics aftermath benefits economically with the Sea to Sky Corridor as the No.1 rated scenic highway in the world, attracting TV advertisers, movies, and high income earners worldwide to drive and 'view' Howe Sound on the Sea to Sky Highway and travel to Whistler.

The Sea to Sky Highway is the No.2 Tourist Attraction only second to Stanley Park for Vancouver. The Museum of Anthropology is No.3, Granville Island is No. 9.

Our BC Ferries, rightfully brag about the spectacular vistas including whales and dolphins in British Columbia's Howe Sound; both whales and dolphins were seen in Howe Sound today, Monday, October 7th, 2013.

6.Heritage: The First Nations Heritage must be considered and protected, as this is a location of great importance and prominance in Canada to the First Nations Heritage with the Squamish Nation.

7.Environment: The Harvey Creek in Lions Bay, Howe Sound, BC, has fish spawning for the first time in 2013; Furry Creek is now full of fish spawning; Britannia Mine was the largest point source of pollution in North America and now has fish in close proximity. Howe Sound is becoming a 'Mecca' for sea life, fresh air and is generating $Billions of Tax Revenue both directly and indirectly as the spectacular corridor to the Resort Municipality of Whistler.

8. Environmental and Social: McNab Creek estuary is a tourism mecca...of paddle boards, cruise ships pass McNab Creek estuary, 3 yacht clubs, many children and family summer camps [many for the underpriviledged]; iconic of 'Spectacular British Columbia'. McNab Creek is the 'Mother's Lap' of Howe Sound. McNab Creek is iconic for British Columbians...at the lap of the snow capped mountains...where your eye naturally falls, always when taking in the breathtaking vistas, you are looking at McNab Creek.

As Howe Sound is a 'colleseum' you cannot say that if you were swimming at water level you would not see this mine, as it will be seen by every passerby, whether by boat, ferry, on the Sea to Sky Corridor or by the frequently seen paddle boards at McNab Creek ~ the mine will be seen due to the 'colleseum'natural geography from the surrounding mountain terrain.

9.Economy and Social: Gravel comes from Mountains and can be found anywhere in BC, thus this project is very unneeded and unnecessary. In the 1980's there was a serious proposal to Open Pit Mine Gambier Island. Had this gone forward Gambier Island would appear to be a vulcano and with European opposition, it is very unlikely that BC would have had the opportunity to host the 2010 Olympics.

Our values as British Columbians with regard to spectacular Howe Sound with McNab Creek as the 'Mother's Lap', have now been secured and cemented,unifying us all with one voice ~ preserve and protect our precious, our beautiful, British Columbian's world class and beloved Howe Sound...the most southerly fjord in North America !

We have worked toward recovery with mammoth effort over decades of time and many successful assertions of the environmental respect that it must be provided. This is British Columbia's jewel, playgroud to 2 million urbanites at their doorstep...what has this yielded...the first sustainability Olympics in history; a growing economy, that compliments the values of the Lower Mainland and acts as the doorway to Whistler's economy; environmental stewardship at a worldclass level; sail boarding, dolphins, whales, salmon, paddle boarding, kayaking, sailing, boating, cruising, film, TV, advertising...McNab Creek is a vital estuary and centre piece in our now thriving Howe Sound...we would be irresponsible to act against these long standing initiatives, that have led to outstanding outcomes...this is the economy, that supports the reason that Mandalay made its first feature film in BC rather than in the southern US ~ Howe Sound was the reason.

McNab Creek, as one of only 3 estuaries in Howe Sound and as the visual 'Mother's Lap' of Howe Sound is integral to responsible stewardship and must be treated with care and protection for the economic, environmental, social, heritage and health benefits to us all in the Lower Mainland, British Columbia and Canada. McNab Creek, as one of only 3 estuaries in Howe Sound and as the visual 'Mother's Lap' of Howe Sound is integral to responsible stewardship and must be treated with care and protection for the economic, environmental, social, heritage and health benefits to us all in the Lower Mainland, British Columbia and Canada.

Cathryn Robertson - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Esturaries are needed for the salmon and the bears. The reindustrializaion of Howe Sound, a marine treasure is not forward thinking. The future of this site will be destroyed for generations, never to be an estuary in a fiord again, ever.

Howe sound has the return of anchovies, humpback whales, orcas, mackeral and bears. Please do not destroy for a gravel mine with the resulting pit.

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Text: While looking at the Burnco references and personal communications cited in the EAC Application/EIS, I notice a reference to myself, Steve Dietrich:

Dietrich, S. 2014. 4.5 Acres Zoned for 2 Waterfront cabins on Gambier Island. Available at:
http://www.gambierislandlotforsale.com/. Accessed 24 Jul 2014. 21-48

I have no idea what they are referencing in the sustainable economy section! All I know is that I have been trying to sell a 4.5 acre waterfront lot within the Douglas Bay community for a few years now. The lot has a direct view of McNab Valley and the local realtor is suggesting that the reason it is not selling is because of the proposed Burnco project. In one of the most heated real estate markets that Vancouver and the surrounding areas has ever seen, I can't seem to attract more than $200,000 for this prime property oceanfront lot. The value seems to be less than I paid for it in 2007. If it were located anywhere else the piece would have easily doubled by now.

The real issue here is that there are so many references in the document that most of then will never be reviewed and they likely have no barring on anything substantially related to the the Burnco project.

Len Gilday - Bowen Island, British Columbia

I live in Howe Sound, on Bowen Island, and have rejoiced as orcas, herrings, salmon and other species have made a slow recovery in their former homelands. The proposed McNab Creek gravel mine will put too all this at risk. Please do not approve this project. It is the wrong plan in the wrong place at the wrong time. It's wrong.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

I am deeply concerned about Burnco's proposed aggregate mine at McNab creek. The McNab Creek estuary is a fragile and important ecological area, home to salmon and at risk species such as Roosevelt Elk and 22 others identified by Burnco's own consultants. A mine in this location would destroy the local ecology and have impacts for the larger ecological area of Howe Sound, which is itself slowly recovering from past industrial pollution. Herring populations are rising and bringing in whales that feed on the herring. A gravel mine would reverse these hard won advances to restore health to Howe Sound. No economic argument for the mine is worth destroying this important habitat, especially when the only winner would be Burnco, and not the people of BC. The very few jobs the mine would create do not justify the irreversible destruction of this land and they would be offset by a likely loss of jobs in other sectors such as ecotourism and recreation that depend on a h ealthy Howe Sound for their economic survival. While my primary concern is for the ecological integrity of this area, I understand there are also some residential lots near the proposed site and I am also concerned about the significant impacts the mine site would have on these people in terms of noise pollution, water pollution, decline in property values, and eyesores on the land.

I am asking you to not approve this mine in this location. I am asking you to please think of the long term health of the land, of Howe Sound and of the wider net of economic activity in the area that depends upon a clean Howe Sound.

Thank you for your consideration and, what I hope will be a thoughtful, wise decision to not grant approval to this development

Rosemary Knight - Bowen Island, British Columbia

My name is Dr. Rosemary Knight. I am a Professor in the School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences at Stanford University, California, and a home-owner on Bowen Island.

I am writing to express my strong opposition to the proposed Burnco Aggregate Project McNab Creek. I am both a research scientist and an educator in the field of environmental sciences. After reviewing the proposal I have to conclude that it makes little sense to locate a gravel mine in this location. The impact on the estuary will be significant. As an educator I find myself continually trying to explain to young people why we made the mistakes we did, and caused the environmental damage we did, over the past decades in our rush for economic development. My excuse/explanation is that we did not really understand the complexities of coupled water/vegetation/animal ecosystems. There is no longer this excuse. This project is something that might have been considered 20 years ago, before we came to understand the functioning of estuarine ecosystems. We now have the knowledge base, and as such, the responsibility to NOT allow such projects in environmentally sensi tive areas like the McNab Creek estuary, that supports not only the species in the estuary, but also in the adjacent Howe Sound. After the industrial mistakes of the past, Howe Sound is in recovery. The marine mammals have returned and we are all celebrating this recovery. Are you sure that this project will not have impacts on Howe Sound that will reverse this environmental success story? Are you sure that this is truly the best use of this land? Are you sure that you have good answers for the young people who will, if this project is approved, look at the destruction and ask – How could you – our provincial government – have allowed this to happen?

Mona Helcermanas-Benge - West Vancouver, British Columbia

I am a life-long resident of Horseshoe Bay and have witnessed the pollution, degradation of the marine environment and thankfully the difficult clean up of Howe Sound. Now as you are no doubt aware, the Orcas, Grey Whales, Dolphins, rock fish, salmon, herring and anchovies have returned. The tourism industry grows with every year and the demographics all around the sound have changed to young families, academics and small business people.

Now it seems that both the provincial and federal levels of government have decided to re-industrialize the sound in direct conflict to what the local residents, municipal governments and 10K signatures on a Declaration to protect Howe Sound have informed the politicians.

I am absolutely opposed to the Burnco project. It is not for the BC or Canadian Government to destroy the estuary of McNab Creek in order to add to Burnco's profit picture. This project has twice been rejected by Ficheries and Oceans Canada due to the likely loss of salmon habitat in McNab Creek. Even Burnco's consultants documented that the gravel quarry could be home to 21 species officially at risk. This includes Roosevelt elk, re-introduced to McNab Creek in 2001 by the BC Ministry of Environment

Since politicians no longer appear to care about our wildlife other than to use pictures of them to attract tourism and hunters, allow me to mention the fact that a very noisy, dusty gravel and crush mill is proposed to be sited next to an existing multi-residential area.

The SCRD already said NO to this project in 2009. How many times will it come back. Until we are all too old to stand up to the politicians who practice corporate socialism?

Should full compensation for loss not be acceptable to local homeowners, this mine should not be approved. Why BC should help this company by allowing the McNab Creek strata title properties to be well within 500' of the proposed mining operations when generally gravel operations are not allowed within 1000' of any residential property.

Apparently there are no plans for air quality monitoring stations in the vicinity. And what about the noise? Marine noise transmits 5-10 times farther and faster through water than through air and it will be terrible enough for the people living nearby.

Yet another danger to the critical eel grass for spawning fish and to the ancient glass sponge reefs.

McNab Creek is in Sechelt traditional territory. Why were they not consulted.

The lobbyists always promote these projects as big job industries but apparently there will very few in this case. Why would you approve something that will cause so much negative impact merely to provide a profit for Burnco?

I ask that you re-do the employment estimates and repost/all additional time for public scrutiny and comments.

I urge that you reject the project and suggest that Burnco find another less damaging location away from Howe Sound.

Personal Information Withheld - Peachland, British Columbia

This area must be protected because of wildlife, ocean life as well as environmental issues and also the enjoyment people get when they visit. It was said to be a natural park, we only have so very few. Is the almighty $$$ and greed so necessary to distroy one of the most important und beautiful areas in B.C. .

Personal Information Withheld - Gibsons, British Columbia

Take a beautiful, alive and natural environment. Add an intensive gravel extraction operation. What is lost and what is gained? That is the trade-off the communities of Howe Sound are being asked to contemplate in reviewing the environmental assessment of the Burnco Aggregate Mine Project.

I do not mind having new economic initiatives in this region, but I wonder what benefit the community (and region) at large would receive from this project.

There has been a concerted effort of communities and citizens around Howe Sound to recover from previous industrialization. This region is a supernatural playground for Lower Mainlanders and visitors, right outside of the urban area. There have been developments in eco-tourism, with cycling routes and marine trails and campsites dotting Howe Sound.

The proposed activity would affect air quality in the region. The activity would create noise from 7am to 9 or 10 pm at least five days a week for twenty years. People have bought property or moved to this area for its recreational and wilderness environmental values. The proposal would take away those things to various degrees from impacted communities around the work site and along the path of the gravel barges as they move towards the Vancouver area.

The proponent must make clear how the affected communities would benefit from this project, especially in light of what would be lost by the presence of the project in this beautiful fjord.

The project should be required to submit the the Sunshine Coast Regional District noise bylaw. The project should be required to use the most direct route to Vancouver, and not travel through Thornborough Channel.

The proponent should be required to take a serious look at the potential impacts of climate change upon the proposed lake and operations site.

The proponent must outline clearly what would be done to reclaim the site upon project completion, and how the outcomes would be monitored for success, and be required to post a bond to ensure reclamation of the site.

B.P. Hanby - West Vancouver, British Columbia

I tried forwarding the criticisms detailed by Eoin Finn with which I fully agree but the Email address used was rejected. Why do Governments make communicating with them so difficult particularly for those not brought up in the computer age?

The proposal to mine Mcnab Creek is a travesty. Howe Sound is gradually recovering from assaults inflicted over the last 100 years, particularly the mining of copper and other metals at the Britannia mine site, serious mercury pollution in the Squamish area and the deposits of furans and dioxins generated by the Woodfibre Mill. Rehabilitation of Britannia Creek including an effective water treatment facility has resulted in returns of salmon and trout. The cost including ongoing maintenance, I understand,is in the order of 100 million dollars paid by the tax payers of this Province. And now we propose further assaults or death by a thousand cuts or maybe three. The first would be the Burnco proposal. This will involve noise and light pollution, damage to marine species and a significant increase in tug and barge traffic. In turn this will impact pinniped and whale species. All for the sake of 10 or 12 permanent jobs. The second will be the approved LNG plant a t Woodfibre - again more marine traffic of substantially larger vessels - significantly detrimental to marine species. And the third would be the approval of Kinder Morgan's twinning of their pipeline into Vancouver. Any oil spill in this area of any size would be scandalous.You are aware that we have recently experienced recoveries of whales, dolphins, herring and now anchovy. Hake populations are strong, all of which bodes well for recreational users of the Sound and therein is its greatest value considering its proximity the Lower Mainland. It seems that Politicians are intent on the Re-industrialisation of Howe Sound. When will they view their decisions holistically? And will there be sufficient bonding provided by Burnco to repair the damage inflicted over the next 16 t0 20 years or will the taxpayer again be on the hook?

Lisa Turpin - Lions Bay, British Columbia

I am absolutely shocked that the province would again be entertaining the reindustrialization of the Howe Sound when we have finally cleaned it up from the last man made environmental impacts. I quote the following from Common Sense Canadian advise you to seriously reconsider issuing any permission for this disastrous impact on the whole environment of the Howe Sound area. The area is not an industrial area and industry does not belong here for many more than the 10 reasons below, however I am just so applaud that we even need to remind the government again that this area is one of the biggest nature tourist generators for the province and KEEP INDUSTRY OUT as the impacts of this decision will be devastating on so many levels.

Why should we care?

Here, from the Future of Howe Sound Society fighting to protect the McNab Creek Valley, are ten very good reasons:

1. Why would anyone develop a gravel mine in Vancouver's ocean playground, an area of outstanding natural beauty? This is where an ever growing city comes to sail, dive, kayak, fish, camp and hike. Tourists flock from all over the world to see "SuperNatural, British Columbia", how would a gravel pit look in the tourism advertising?

2. Howe Sound is only now showing encouraging signs of environmental recovery after decades of industrial misuse. Should we now allow a reindustrialization of the area?

3. How can we consider developing a massive 77 hectare pit which will excavate the entire McNab estuary from one side of the valley to the other, completely eliminating one of only three river estuaries in Howe Sound, without developing an integrated, long term land and water use plan for the whole of Howe Sound?

4. The size of the gravel pit will limit access to the foreshore for wildlife such as elk, deer and bears who currently frequent the area to forage for food.

5. The excavation of the river estuary will dramatically change the movement of water through the valley and have a significant negative impact on the freshwater habitat.

6. The proposed mine developer, Burnco, filed a judicial review application against DFO in BC Supreme Court to 'strong arm' the DFO to allow them to proceed to an environmental review. The DFO have since agreed to that review with serious concerns as "the project presents a high risk to Salmon and Salmon habitat".

7. In addition to the destruction to fish habitat, Burnco's own consultants believe the mine site could be home to 21 species at risk including a population of Roosevelt Elk re-introduced to McNab Creek in 2001 by the BC Ministry of the Environment.

8. The noise from the gravel crushing facility and loading of barges will be significant. It will have a negative impact on the enjoyment of the area by boaters, kayakers, fishermen, tourists and other in Howe Sound. The mine developer has stated at meetings that if the demand is there, they want to run the mining and crushing facilities 24/7, 365 days a year.

9. Noise and light pollution will have significant negative impacts on the land and aquatic animals in the area. Noise and vibration pollution have been found to negatively impact the ability of marine mammals to communicate, navigate, find food and it is believed increasingly to impact their fertility.

10. The mine will have an impact on the economic potential of the Howe Sound area. There is considerable potential in Howe Sound to continue to grow the tourism industry with significant economic multipliers that would accrue to the local economy. A mine is not going to add to the beauty of the area.

Personal Information Withheld - West Vancouver, British Columbia

I am opposed the the proposed McNab Creek mine. It will cause great harm to the ecosystem there while providing minimal jobs. I think nature should win in this case.

Valori McKay - Lions Bay, British Columbia

I live on Howe Sound and recreate in and on the waters. I oppose the loss of environment the gravel mine will create and the danger that increased shipping will cause to wildlife and humans both.

Personal Information Withheld - Sunshine Coast, British Columbia

Please receive the attached document as the Sunshine Coast Conservation Association's review of the Environmental Impact Statement of the proposed Burnco Aggregate Project in Howe Sound, British Columbia.

This submission has been compiled from concerns raised by our members and the community at large. It is founded on local and professional knowledge of the McNab Watershed and surrounding environment. This document was written with an emphasis on the upland impacts of fish and fish habitat, as well as impacts on the McNab estuary, forage fish populations, and glass sponge reefs.

Submission

Personal Information Withheld - Furry Creek, British Columbia

Over the past 16 years living on Howe Sound I have watched the painfully slow but amazing recovery of sea life here. I am worried that without a holistic approach to regulate big industry on Howe Sound that we will again wipe out what lives in and around these waters. My degree is science, but I am well aware of the need for some industrial considerations but not for this project at McNab Creek. The negatives here far outweigh the incorrectly perceived need for gravel at this location. It would be disastrous for the salmon, prawns, recreational boaters and the estuary. It is a mystery to me how government can think that such a close marriage between tourism and heavy industry could possibly work. The corridor needs to be protected or our touted "pristine Sea to Sky tourism" could die. Please vote NO on this project!

steven threndyle - North Vancouver, British Columbia

As a freelance travel writer who specializes in writing about British Columbia, I have to go on record as saying that the head of Howe Sound is one of the wildest, yet oddly most accessible, places I've ever been. A short boat ride from West Vancouver or Squamish, and you are transported into a wonderful ecosystem of productive fishing habitat, Coast Range mountain peaks (the McNab Lions!) and a pristine stretch of beach. The tranquility of this special spot would be severely compromised by the Burnco Gravel operation; both from a scenic and - far worse - the sonic disturbance of gravel crushers. Please consider how special Howe Sound is and make this region part of a wilderness area or put it into the provincial park system. Save this precious land for our children... some of whom are photographed enjoying McNab Creek, here.

Personal Information Withheld - Salt Spring Island, British Columbia

I lived in Squamish from 1980-84 then from 1988-2015. During that time I have witnessed the slow recovery of Howe Sound and its communities from resource industry acitivity. Brittania Mine, Woodfibre Pulp and Paper, Nexen Chemical plant, various woodsorts, the port facility, the railway and its expansion have all had an impact on the health of the environment and left a legacy of contamination to dealt with. Knowing what we know now, from the history of the industry ...the toxins in the soil and water, the discruption of ecosystems on land and in water and the air quality issues I cannot believe that any further industrial activity is being considered. Clean energy is the path that we need to be taking. None of the proposals for Howe Sound can be justified to be clean industry and safe for the environment. Specifically, the Burnco project is on one the the last remaining estuaries on our south coast. This development should not be given any approval.

Susan Swift - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Honourable Assessors,

I am a relatively new resident (3 years) of Bowen Island in Howe Sound, a beautiful fjord that is home to Bowyer, Bowen, Gambier, Anvil, and the Pasley Islands. My husband owns a kayak business on Bowen Island and we depend on tourism and the health of our marine environment for our survival. We view the BURNCO mine application with horror, knowing that it threatens the Sound's recovery (as documented by David Suzuki and others.) We are just one family dependent on the sea, but there are many, many, many krill, plankton, herring and anchovy "families" who also call this home. The marine food chain depends upon these families thriving in order to support seals, sea lions, whales, dolphins, cod, and salmon -- the oceanic ambassadors of British Columbia. The BURNCO mine is a documented threat to the families that rely on a healthy Howe Sound for their survival. http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/anchovy-schools-are-back-in-session-with-phenomenal-numbers-sp awning-in-howe-sound

Dr. R. Bruce Bessie - Furry Creek, British Columbia

My family has resided within the corridor for 48 years. Over this period of time , the Sound has slowly recovered from a devastingly low point when the Biritianna mine and Woodfiber pulp mill were both seriuisly contributing to the decline of marine life within this Southern most fjord of the BC coast . Over this time ,we have witnessed the huge tourism growth within the corridor and fully supported the goals of the previous BC government agencies in developing this corridor as the center piece of " Super Natural BC ". This Southern Fjord is a jewel and is the centrepiece of the tourism and recreation market . The value of this market in taxes, revenue generation and employment far out ways the return from an industrial mine, especially when there is no need for further development of this resource , according to statistics from already operational gravel mines within the lower mainland.

With my university educated background , I feel that approval of this application is VERY shortsighted and I truly hope you will recognize the potential danger that approval of this application may have on such a great BC tourism asset . I hope you will weigh the value of Howe Sound to the Super Natural BC image and will be good long range thinkers!

Martin Smith - North Vancouver, British Columbia

I am writing to urge against the proposed gravel mine operation at Mcnabb Creek in Howe Sound. There are not many wild areas left near Vancouver but those like McNabb creek estuary should be left to develope naturaly.

Thankyou for considering my views

Personal Information Withheld - British Columbia

No. No and no....leave my BC alone. No

Luisa Nitrato Izzo - Squamish, British Columbia

This project presents a serious risk to salmon and salmon habitat. For this reason I STRONGLY urge you to reject the proposal. We must protect this valuable salmon habitat for generations to come through wide stewardship, not destroy it through projects such as this one that seriously threaten our environment.

Thank you.

Jonathan Bennett - Bowen Island, British Columbia

I implore you not to approve this mine project. Howe Sound is one of the planet's jewels - you can count on the fingers of one hand the deep ocean sounds close to major metropolitan areas - and it is gradually, visibly recovering from decades of industrial misuse. It would be not only wicked but stupid to let something happen that will slow or even reverse that recovery.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Totally inappropriate location for this type of enterprise. Howe Sound is just starting to recover from previous industrial misuses - let's not take a giant step backwards.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

It is completely inappropriate to allow the Burnco gravel mine to operate in this incredibly beautiful and environmentally sensitive area of Howe Sound. Given the slow, but important recovery finally occurring in this area, no project like this should ever be approved. I strongly oppose this project.

Personal Information Withheld - West Vancouver, British Columbia

This Burnco Aggregate Project must not be approved. Howe Sound is finally cleaning up after decades of mills polluting the air and water. This would be a catastrophe! We must not continue to destroy the environment. Do not approve this project.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

A Letter Regarding Burnco Aggregate Project at McNab Creek, Howe Sound, BC

To: Environmental Assessment Office

I am a young person who grew up on Bowen Island in Howe Sound and a biologist and oceanographer. I am writing to you in opposition to the wet gravel mine proposed for McNab Creek by Burnco.

First, why would anyone mine an estuary in an area (Howe Sound) that is still recovering from earlier industrialization. The whole area, which is the recreational area for Vancouver and the Lower Mainland, has a high tourism and ecological value. Because of intensive post-industrial remediation, we who live in Howe Sound are seeing the return of herring and anchovies and large mammals such as dolphins, sea lions and whales. I understand that a small population of elk have been re-established near McNab Creek and will be affected by a mine. Other indigenous animals will be cut off by the mine from the estuary.

Please, for all our sakes, turn down this application for a gravel mine on this important habitat.
Why would the province bother doing all the costly remediation work of Britannia Mines and other industrial sites to turn around and undo it by approving this proposal?

Thank you for your careful and attentive work protecting our home.

All the best,

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

A Letter Regarding Burnco Aggregate Project at McNab Creek, Howe Sound, BC

To: Environmental Assessment Office

I am a young person who grew up on Bowen Island in Howe Sound and a biologist and oceanographer. I am writing to you in opposition to the wet gravel mine proposed for McNab Creek by Burnco.

First, why would anyone mine an estuary in an area (Howe Sound) that is still recovering from earlier industrialization. The whole area, which is the recreational area for Vancouver and the Lower Mainland, has a high tourism and ecological value. Because of intensive post-industrial remediation, we who live in Howe Sound are seeing the return of herring and anchovies and large mammals such as dolphins, sea lions and whales. I understand that a small population of elk have been re-established near McNab Creek and will be affected by a mine. Other indigenous animals will be cut off by the mine from the estuary.

Please, for all our sakes, turn down this application for a gravel mine on this important habitat.
Why would the province bother doing all the costly remediation work of Britannia Mines and other industrial sites to turn around and undo it by approving this proposal?

Thank you for your careful and attentive work protecting our home.

All the best,

Susan Alexander - Bowen Island, British Columbia

A Letter Regarding Burnco Aggregate Project at McNab Creek, Howe Sound, BC

To: Environmental Assessment Office

I am writing to you in opposition to the wet gravel mine proposed for McNab Creek by Burnco.

First, why would anyone mine an estuary in an area (Howe Sound) that is still recovering from earlier industrialization. The whole area, which is the recreational area for Vancouver and the Lower Mainland, has a high tourism and ecological value. Because of intensive post-industrial remediation, we who live in Howe Sound are seeing the return of herring and anchovies and large mammals such as dolphins, sea lions and whales. I understand that a small population of elk have been re-established near McNab Creek and will be affected by a mine. Other indigenous animals will be cut off by the mine from the estuary.

Please, for all our sakes, turn down this application for a gravel mine on this important habitat.
Why would the province bother doing all the costly remediation work of Britannia Mines and other industrial sites to turn around and undo it by approving this proposal?

Thank you for your careful and attentive work protecting our home.

All the best,

Liz de Beer - Langdale, British Columbia

I am opposed to the Burnco Aggregate Project and all industrial activity in the Howe Sound. We have finally seen whales returning to this area during the last 3 years. Howe Sound should be designated as a World Heritage Site (UNESCO)instead of ripping it apart for a few measly jobs. Few major Cities have access to unspoiled nature as Vancouver do with Howe Sound at its doorstep. What a shame if this project should go through!

Jan de Beer - Langdale, British Columbia

I am opposed to the Burnco Aggregate Project and all industrial activity in the Howe Sound. We have finally seen whales returning to this area during the last 3 years. Howe Sound should be designated as a World Heritage Site (UNESCO)instead of ripping it apart for a few measly jobs. Few major Cities have access to unspoiled nature as Vancouver do with Howe Sound at its doorstep. What a shame if this project should go through!

Anne Miles - Gibsons, British Columbia

Please do not re-industrialize Howe Sound. It is more valuable, in so many ways, in its natural state.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Clearly, there is no conscience when it comes to monetary greed which is what this proposal appears to be. Please, in the name of present generations and of those to come, do not be remembered for permitting the destruction of this pristine estuary.

DO NOT ALLOW the Burnco Aggregate Project to proceed. Thank you.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Don't do it. It is such a wonderful beautiful place, how many of these natural beauties do we have to give up for the profit of a company.

George C. Hamilton - Brackendale, British Columbia

I do not believe that the proposed gravel mine in the McNab Creek area should be approved. Any "economic benefits" which might derive from the project for various parties would be far outweighed by the massive environmental degradation which would result from the project.

There are many potential gravel sources -- there is only one Howe Sound, a priceless jewel particularly in view of its close proximity to Metro Vancouver.

Lea Bradford - Bowen Island, British Columbia

I can not believe this is even under consideration....what are you thinking?

No. No. No. Please. No.

John Buchanan - Squamish, British Columbia

1) Throughout the downstream side of the project there are a multitude of ground water channels that are essential rearing areas for both Coho and Chinook. For the moment I am not taking about the big main spawning channel constructed, but the smaller ones along either side. Construction of this gravel mine would cut off all fresh water supplies to these naturally occurring channels. My field studies prove that these smaller channels are very productive streams.

2) The big main Spawning channel that was constructed does work. The multiple times over the last three years that I have gone in to do field work have indicated to me that not only the constructed ground channel is very productive contrary to the proponents claims but there is an array of smaller natural ground water channels that come from the site that prove to be very good rearing areas for coho fry. Couldn't keep them out of my traps. In the very top end of the constructed ground channel I thought my trap was stuck on something then realized it was weighted down by cut throat. Also I hate seeing these dated photos of the ground water channel at all the presentations. Today the ground water channel is nicely vegetated in. There is quite a large Beaver dam at the lower end that prevents spawners from gaining access to the upper end but this could be notched every fall to rectify the situation, but of course if your trying to paint a picture of absence of fis h and bleakness you wouldn't want to promote such a thing would you ? This of course is what this process for the proponent is all about. It's an old developers game. Down play the habitat and pay little to no compensation.

3) The main creek Mcnab, would be threaten, in what can only be described as a planned catastrophic drying up of a well know spawning area for Pink, Chinook, coho, and yes even Sockeye Salmon have been documented in the creek. You don't have to be an expert in hydrology to see what will happen. The creek already experiences a drying up of the creek at the top end of the planned mining area. This drying up usually in August, start of Sept. prevents any Salmon from entering the creek system. The mines activities would create this massive crater causing the bottom of Mcnab creeks water to basicly drain out and dry over a much longer period completely wiping out all runs of spawning salmon. Yes the proponent is planning to build berms to dam the waters but the elevations required to maintain the integrity of the water contained in Mcnab creek would have to be huge in height, and be three sided, berm along the shore line and Berm to the right and to the left of t he property.

In conclusion I would ask that this project be turned down. I have included one of my many field reports from the last 3 years that clearly shows the productivity of the area for Salmon.

salmon survey

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Who in government is assessing this project and what are the environmental criteria. It is astonishing this could even be eligible to be proposed. What about the economic assessment ? Surely Howe Sound is more valuable to British Columbia as a recreational/tourist asset than a gravel mine for an Alberta company.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

This project is not compatible with the ongoing recovery of Howe Sound from past industrial activity, nor its recreational use. Is this the highest and best use for Howe Sound? This project will harm what is becoming a strong tourist attraction with the return of whales, dolphins, orcas, and fishing. It is widely recognized that Howe Sound was extensively damaged by past industrial activity. Over the past 30 years, advances in environmental legislation and closure and remediation of past industrial sites has reduced pollution in Howe Sound. A recovery of marine life over the past 15 years, and particularly over the past 5 years, is indicated by the greatly increased presence of whales, dolphins, pink and Chinook salmon, and herring and anchovy. The Province has invested heavily in this enterprise, not the least of which are the ongoing costs of managing Britannia Mine effluent. As a consequence of all these changes, and the increasing demands of the growing p opulation of metropolitan Vancouver, recreational use of Howe Sound has increased dramatically. A new industrial operation on a new greenfield site with significant ecological impacts is out of step with these trends.

Currently, the footprint of industry (except for forestry) is absent from the entire 25 km long western shore of Howe Sound from Port Mellon to Woodfibre. Northern Thornborough Channel is a prime recreational area for boaters. The noise and visual impacts from the proposed project would be a significant intrusion on the recreational values of this area.

Donna Lawrence - West Vancouver, British Columbia

I am opposed to this project.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

I am opposed to this proposal due to the large impact on the watershed and limited economic impact. In particular impact on a salmon bearing stream. Existing brownfield sites in howesound are much more appropriate for economic development.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

I am opposed to this proposal due to the large impact on the watershed and limited economic impact. In particular impact on a salmon bearing stream. Existing brownfield sites in howesound are much more appropriate for economic development.

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Hard for nature to continue to thrive when projects like this are approved. I am Not in favour of this project

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Comments to Environmental Assessment Office regarding Burnco Aggregate Project McNab Creek, Howe Sound, BC Submitted October 2, 2016

Dr. Robert Turner, 710 Minnows Lane, Bowen Island, BC V0N1G2 Personal background BSc Geological Engineering, Queens University; MSc, PhD Geology, Stanford University Research scientist, Geological Survey of Canada, Vancouver 1989-2014 Resident, Bowen Island, 1989 - present Mayor, Bowen Island, 2005-2011 Lead organizer, 1991 Howe Sound Environmental Science Workshop and co-editor of conference proceedings (Levings et al, 1991)

1. Comment: Estuaries are ecological jewels. The entire Howe Sound inlet has very limited wild and functional estuary. McNab Creek is the second largest estuary in Howe Sound. Why would you mine it?

McNab Creek is the second largest estuary in Howe Sound. Estuaries form a tiny portion of Howe Sound's total shoreline but are its richest shoreline habitats in terms so biodiversity and biological productivity. Estuaries are ecological jewels in the broader context of Howe Sound's ecological function and deserve our highest protection.

2. Comment: Burnco proposal largely blocks the animal corridor between upper McNab valley and shoreline, functionally disconnecting estuary from uplands.

The proposal intends to fill three quarters of the lower one kilometer of the McNab Creek valley with a 24/7 industrial operation that will alienate that area from wildlife, and spread industrial noise throughout the lower valley for at least the project lifetime. It is inconceivable that this industrial noise and land alienation will not greatly limit the function of the lower valley as habitat and greatly disconnect migration of mammals such as elk, black bear, wolves, and grizzly bear between upper valley and the shore. Local observations show the estuary is heavily used by elk and black bear, and occasionally by grizzly bear and wolves. I have visited McNab Creek many times and have seen the tracks.

Question 2.1: How will the project proposal offset the project impacts on elk, bear and wolf migration along the valley floor from upper valley to estuary?

Question 2.2: Given ongoing forestry operations in McNab Creek valley, and extensive past cutting of valley floor forests, and recent construction of the Box Canyon power project, how does the additional impact of the Burnco proposal relate to the cumulative impacts of other past and ongoing industry in the valley?

Question 2.3: What cumulative effects assessment has been made of ecosystem health of the McNab Creek valley?

3. Comment: The project will permanently isolate McNab Creek from migration across the majority of its natural floodplain.

The natural habit of the river is to wander back and forth across its natural floodplain and estuary. Berms surrounding the proposed pit will permanently restrict McNab Creek to the eastern margin of the estuary. The berms will isolate the Creek from three quarters of its natural fan delta, removing the Creek's ability to directly replenish sediment to the western part of the estuary and create diverse habitats. Given ongoing sea level rise, forecast to be at least 1 m rise by 2100, this lack of direct sedimentation to the western estuary will increase the risk of shoreline erosion, wet meadow and tidal flat erosion, and shoreline retreat, with consequent valuable habitat loss throughout this area.

Question 3.1: What mitigation is proposed to offset the loss of natural river-mouth migration, and the loss of sediment deposition and natural aggradation across the western side of the estuary?

4. Comment: Why permit a "wet" gravel mine?

Almost all of BC's gravel resources are located on forested hillsides. These "dry" aggregate resources are abundant in the south coast region, sufficient for decades of development needs. Dry deposits typically do not occupy vital ecological landscapes given that forested slopes are extensive (and therefore not unique) throughout the region. Burnco on the other hand is applying to mine a "wet" gravel resource that occupies a critical high ecological value estuary. This makes no sense to my geological experience. It is well understood that the mining industry doesn't get to choose where a resource is. Sometimes the resource is in the wrong place to mine. McNab Creek estuary is just such a location.

Question 4.1: Why should a gravel mine be permitted in an ecologically sensitive area, when there are extensive undeveloped gravel resources in much less sensitive areas?

5. Comment: Inappropriate location for a Processing/Stockpiles Area At McNab, a forest 30-300m wide of second growth sitka spruce-hemlock forest 80-250 years old fringes the entire estuary shoreline. This mature forest is an essential element of the estuary, forming a natural transition between upland and wet meadow-tidal flats of the intertidal estuary. The entire one kilometer of estuary shoreline with fringing forest, intertidal marsh and mud-sand-cobble tidal flats intact at McNab Creek. This coastal strip is the most valuable and sensitive part of the estuary.

The Processing/Stockpiles Area is proposed within the fringing forest of this coastal strip. This will require clearing of a large tract of mature second growth 80-250 year old hemlock-sitka spruce forest. This forest zone is 150-200m wide at the Processing/Stockpiles Area site and all but a sliver-thin buffer will be lost.

Question 5.1: Why is the processing facility not located inland, north of the power line, and well back from the most ecologically sensitive area of the estuary?

6. Comment: Inadequate proposed reclamation plan due to incorrect downgrade of forest capability from Class 1 forest to Class 3 forest The following is based on 4.0 Reclamation and Effective Closure Plan Document, Golder Associates. Forest capability mapping done prior to logging and published in 1984 (Serryk and Perry 1984) rated the project area forests as a Class 1 forest. The proponents argue that, because it is "disturbed", the area should be downgraded to a Class 3 forest area, and that required reclamation only need to compensate to a Class 3 forest level (page 6). But the proponents provide no evidence of disturbance beyond previous logging.

Question 6.1: Why would a provincial government "forest capability" map that was based on observation of the existing forest type (Serryk and Perry 1984) not be the accurate assessment of what the forest capable of growing in the project area? Why would logging of the forest change the capability of the site to grow a forest?

7. Comment: Proponent soil assessment is inadequate.

No soils mapping was conducted by the proponent. Rather a series of soil pits were used to test the soils and interpolate soil characteristics between pits (Figure 3). The pit locations are not on any type of grid, or guided by existing soil mapping, and so the location of the test pits appears arbitrary, and provides no confidence that the soil pits are representative of the soils in the project area.

Further, the proponent excludes examination and discussion of the soils in the Processing/Stockpiles Area. The Golder report states on page 6 "The Proposed Project Area consists of unvegetated or sparsely vegetated areas; small pockets of shrub dominated, sapling forest, and young forest structural stages. Mature forest is located to the north and east, outside of the Proposed Project Area."

Question 7.1: Why is there no mention of the mature forest areas that will be cleared for the Processing/Stockpiles Area at the shoreface?

Curiously, no soil pits were dug in the proposed Processing/Stockpiles Area area where a mature Class 1 forest currently stands.

Question 7.2: Why did the proponent not sample any of the soils in the Processing/Stockpiles Area?

The proponents arguments that given that the land has been logged, therefore its "forest capability" has been reduced from a Class 1 to a Class 3 forest appears to lack basis. The proponents soil pit study does not provide evidence that the sites chosen for sampling are indeed representative of the project area. Confidence in this study is further eroded by the lack of soil sampling of the proposed Processing/Stockpiles Area, a standing Class 1 forest. All this leads to a larger question.

Question 7.3: Why is the reclamation plan not based on reestablishing a Class 1 forest after closure?

8. Comment and question: Environmental bonding Given the high ecological values of McNab Creek estuary, and the large impacts this proposal will impose on the estuary, and the critical role that estuaries play in Howe Sound, this proposal also poses serious risks to the larger ecosystem health of Howe Sound. Should a mine go ahead, it is critical that environmental reclamation and monitoring of reclamation works be successful to the highest standards. To ensure reclamation compliance, and public confidence that this will indeed be achieved, significant environmental bonds need to be in place.

Question 8.1: What criteria are being used to evaluate the necessary level of environmental bonding for reclamation?

Question 8.2: What amount of reclamation bonding is required of the proponent before start of works?

9. Comment: This project will expand industrial activity to a new greenfield site in Howe Sound. This project is not compatible with the ongoing recovery of Howe Sound from past industrial activity, nor its recreational use. Is this the highest and best use for Howe Sound?

It is widely recognized that Howe Sound was extensively damaged by past industrial activity. Over the past 30 years, advances in environmental legislation and closure and remediation of past industrial sites has reduced pollution in Howe Sound. A recovery of marine life over the past 15 years, and particularly over the past 5 years, is indicated by the greatly increased presence of whales, dolphins, pink and Chinook salmon, and herring and anchovy. The Province has invested heavily in this enterprise, not the least of which are the ongoing costs of managing Britannia Mine effluent. As a consequence of all these changes, and the increasing demands of the growing population of metropolitan Vancouver, recreational use of Howe Sound has increased dramatically. A new industrial operation on a new greenfield site with significant ecological impacts is out of step with these trends.

Currently, the footprint of industry (except for forestry) is absent from the entire 25 km long western shore of Howe Sound from Port Mellon to Woodfibre. Northern Thornborough Channel is a prime recreational area for boaters. The noise and visual impacts from the proposed project would be a significant intrusion on the recreational values of this area.

Question 9.1: What criteria suggest that this proposal is compatible with the "highest and best use" of the McNab Creek estuary and northern Thorborough Channel?

Question 9.2: What criteria suggest that the impacts of this proposal will not be detrimental to the ongoing recovery of marine ecosystems of Howe Sound?

Personal Information Withheld - Brackendale, British Columbia

Please DON'T allow this project to proceed. The environmental damage will far outweigh public benefit.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

I am a resident of Bowen Island and a long time recreational user of Howe Sound.

I am unequivocally opposed to the Burnco project.

Whether considered from an economic, ecological for social perspective, the project does not merit approval. When all of these considerations are taken into account, The case for refusal is overwhelming.

Economic –while the project undoubtedly would provide economic benefits, they are outweighed by the economic benefits tourism and recreation would provide. The alternative uses are not compatible. Further, the economic benefit of a gravel mine can be achieved elsewhere in the province, which is not the case for tourism and recreation, the economic values of which are dependent on proximity to Metro Vancouver.

Ecological – Mcnab Creek is one of the last estuaries in Howe Sound that has not been intensively developed. The estuary has significant fisheries values, which will be completely destroyed if the project proceeds, and which cannot be replaced. From an ecological perspective the project has no benefit whatsoever. This alone should lead to rejection.

Social –public opinion is overwhelming that the Howe Sound environment should be treasured and protected. Regard should be had to this public opinion.

A large scale industrial development in Howe Sound will diminish the recreational opportunities for the many thousands who know use the sound and the many more thousands who will seek recreational opportunities near to Metro Vancouver in future. The proximity of an environmentally healthy and aesthetically attractive Howe Sound to Metro Vancouver is vital to the quality of life enjoyed by residents today and the millions who will be here in future.

The project does not merit approval.

Judith Holm - Squamish, British Columbia

The project has (twice) been rejected by Fisheries & Oceans Canada because of the likely loss of salmon habitat in McNab Creek.

The strip of forest cover between the pit and the ocean is too narrow to be sustainable. Blowdown and saltwater invasion will threaten its existence.

The impact of marine noise (from the conveyor belts –tugs, barge loading and water taxis) on cetaceans, herring, salmon (spawning adult and habituating juveniles) is underestimated.

Burnco - Issues, Info, Criticism, Recommendations re the McNab Creek Aggregate Mine ApplicationBurnco - Issues, Info, Criticism, Recommendations re the McNab Creek Aggregate Mine ApplicationBurnco - Issues, Info, Criticism, Recommendations re the McNab Creek Aggregate Mine ApplicationBurnco - Issues, Info, Criticism, Recommendations re the McNab Creek Aggregate Mine ApplicationBurnco - Issues, Info, Criticism, Recommendations re the McNab Creek Aggregate Mine ApplicationBurnco - Issues, Info, Criticism, Recommendati												ons re the McNab Creek Aggregate Mine Application

I Sarama - Gibsons, British Columbia

After a century of damage from the legacy of industrial abuse, Howe Sound is finally showing signs of recovery.

The expansion of this type of industry will do nothing to enhance this recovery, and in fact, will cause further damage. For example, how can this project help herring and salmon stocks in the area of the MacNabb Creek estuary? It cannot, and will not, and will only cause further harm.

Do not allow this permit!

Kate O'Connor - Squamish, British Columbia

This project will negatively affect the salmon habitat in this environmentally sensitive area. The salmon runs are decreasing and we need to protect McNab creek against industry that will decrease salmon populations. The saltwater leeching from the pit into the creek will kill salmon and have disastrous effects to the ecosystem at many levels as the salmon play an integral role in the ecosystem functioning. The proponent has no experience managing a marine environment for an aggregate mine and there are also no air quality monitoring stations nearby, causing further concerns for other species. This mine would cause serious environmental degradation to a sensitive area causing ripple effects to many other ecosystems. I urge you to protect this sensitive area and decline the application for industry here.

B Underhill - Bowen Island, British Columbia

No graville pit in McNab Creek. We don't want it and no further tugs, barges shipping the crap down Howe Sound.

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

"Calgary-based Burnco Rock Products donated $34,000 to the Liberals, bringing their eight year running total to $219,700.

Burnco has big plans for a large scale gravel mine at McNab Creek at the northern end of Howe Sound. If it gets the green light, it'll crush and process gravel 24 hours a day, 365 days a year."

-http://www.straight.com/news/633181/dermod-travis-outlandish-donations-bc-political-parties

This report is 2 years old. How much more has Burnco donated, during an election year, in attempts to grease the wheels that this project goes through.

It's been clearly repeated below that the human and environmental impacts of this project are unacceptable. Do the right thing and stop it from happening.

Lauren Ollsin - North Vancouver, British Columbia

I had hoped this selfish project proposal would never be reconsidered. Just because the gravel is there and could cheaply be stolen and the estuary ruined, doesn't mean it should be. As a champion of wild fish and as a sailor, I strongly oppose this proposal.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

I am against this project for Howe Sound.

The Proponent's claim that it is a necessary operation due to demand in Vancouver, is not accurate. The 12 jobs they will employ full time, rob other BC Corps from key personnel.

The Proponent has no experience operating aggregate mine in the marine environment (contrary to claims by the Project Manager, a mine near the Bow River in Calgary does not qualify as "marine"). Their offset plan for mitigating has a huge possibility of not working. Who would be monitoring this closely? The proposed "compensation channel" is key to attempts to mitigate the loss of fish habitat in this project. Should it fail, even partially, accountability and compensation for the loss should be automatic.

Any approval of this proposal should include a contingency bond to fund maintenance of the new streamway, an overflow gate from the pit lake, and a fully-funded alternate solution should the offset plan fail. The bond should also be sufficient to cover site remediation at end-of-project.

Night scapes are enjoyed by the residents and with 80% of the worlds night scapes reduced this needs to be considered.

The McNab area (and much of Howe Sound) is currently a dark zone, allowing residents visibility of the wonders of the night sky. Plant lighting will destroy this local value for much of the year

Any approval must come with strict (and measurable) restrictions on lighting intensity and local dispersion. Local authorities (eg. SCRD) should have the power to compel a reduction, suspension or cessation of mine activities where light intensities exceed pre-agreed norms

Water quality is insufficiently characterized in the application.
Removing sediment in the water discharged into the ocean is critical to habitat protection, not least for the nearby eel grass beds and glass sponge reefs.

Siltation monitoring (both in the original and compensation channels and in the nearby ocean) , with periodic reporting of results that are auditable and accessible to the public , should be part of any approval of the project. Local authorities (eg. SCRD) should have the power to compel a reduction, suspension or cessation of mine activities where sediment/siltation exceeds pre-agreed norms There was an inconsistency between the job creation figures shown in 2 different slides in the Open Houses

One showed about 300 person-years of employment (over 25 years). The other (derived from input-output analysis) showed person-year employment benefits several times that amount.

This misleading discrepancy should be resolved by further analysis, and that section of the application re-submitted, with additional time allowed for public scrutiny and comment

October 1, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

STOP the Burnco mine project. Keep our Howe Sound Healthy! Without our environment we will be nothing!!

Vel Anderson - Gibsons, British Columbia

We are in the Cascadia subduction earthquake zone, scientists find there is an 85% chance of a major earthquake, BC Government states there is a 1 in 3 chance that a major earthquake will happen within the next 50 years.

The idea of a berm, built partially of the silt removed from washing of the gravel, along a portion of McNab Creek to the North, and a similar berm, built along the South section of the man made lake will face liquefaction and flooding in a major earthquake.

There is a very serious concern about the whole estuary being wiped out should a mega earthquake hit. The man made berms will liquefy and flood across the estuary. This will smother all the small and very small marine life forms. We will see an adverse impact on species in the Sound for many years, as without the nutrient of the smaller marine life, the next level of fish will not survive.

Has a recent geological engineering seismic study been done on the area?

Has high energy seismic surveys in Federal waters been carried out recently?

Do you have a seismic mediation strategy report or study?

Will an earthquake warning device be placed at the project, if not, why?

When the entire zone gives way at once, an event that seismologists call a full-margin rupture, the magnitude will be somewhere between 8.7 and 9.2. (http://www.inquisitr.com/2255422/cascadia-fault-line-earthquake-prediction-for-californiaoregon-claims-a-megaquake-tsunami/#LFO6y7WPuzAtLDt1.99)

"Great Subduction Zone earthquakes are the largest earthquakes in the world, and are the only source zones that can produce earthquakes greater than M8.5. The CSZ has produced magnitude 9.0 or greater earthquakes in the past, and undoubtedly will in the future." (https://pnsn.org/outreach/earthquakesources/csz

Cheryle Dobbyn - Alberta

Dear Important Person: I live on the east side of the Rocky Mountains in Alberta. I'm old now, but I grew up in Saskatchewan...a true 'prairie kid'. For me, the West Coast is Canada's most beautiful gift.I love taking time to visit, embrace, and breathe in the beauty of our West Coast. For decades, I watched and listened as people fought to protect and restore Howe Sound. I rejoiced when The Sound began, and then has continued, to become a healthy, clean and vibrant living ocean again. PLEASE, after all this work and blood and sweat and money and time and supreme effort....do not open up this old wound of noise, pollution, and dirty extraction for the almighty dollar. I would prefer to see almighty whales in Howe Sound...and perhaps a kayak or two or ten.

Please.

Leslie Stanick - Surrey, British Columbia

Howe Sound is teeming with life, from salmon and herring, seals, orcas and humpback whales. Bird life including cormorants, eagles, gulls, herons and many other species make their home in this unique sound, filled with wildlife. Its a magical wildlife refuge.

So when I heard that the Burnco Aggregate Project, a gravel mine 100 football fields long, and as deep as a ten story building is being proposed on the sand flats, I had to protest. The flats are a vital spawning ground for salmon which have only recently made a comeback after the devastating pollution of Howe Sound by 100 years of logging and mining. With the devastating lack of salmon this year, only 800,000 returning to spawn in the Fraser River, it would be crazy to destroy an estuary that is just coming back to life on these tidal flats.

The Burnco Mine project would be creating noise 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, destroying the peace of this beautiful region, causing distress to all the wildlife in the area. Don't destroy this unique and beautiful haven of tranquility for a gravel pit. Please protect this jewel for generations to come.

Denise Olson - Granthams Landing, British Columbia

I would like it noted publicly that I am AGAINST Burnco and affiliates proposed operation of gravel mining in McNab creek area in Howe Sound. My opposition is based on the obvious pollution of Howe Sound which will accur if this project is allowed to disturb a recovering ecosystem.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

As a resident of Bowen Island in Howe sound for the past 16 , I have watched with great joy the Dolphins return, the salmon and herring , the whales etc. All a direct result of eliminating the industries in the Sound that inhibited that process in the past. It would be insane to contemplate a reversal by allowing the introduction of more polluting industries in Howe Sounds.Please reject this application!

Delena Angrignon - Squamish, British Columbia

Dear BCEAO,

I am opposed to the Burnco Gravel Project.

Environmentally this project would be a disaster for one of the 3 only Estuaries in Howe Sound.

This project has been refused in the past due to concerns about the fish and fish habitat in McNab Creek, in particular the Chum and Coho Salmon. It's only because of gutted environmental laws by the Harper Government that Bunco is back trying to get approval.

The proposed mine developer, Burnco, filed a judicial review application against DFO in BC Supreme Court to 'strong arm' the DFO to allow them to proceed to an environmental review. The DFO have since agreed to that review with serious concerns as "the project presents a high risk to Salmon and Salmon habitat".

In addition to the destruction to fish habitat, Burnco's own consultants believe the mine site could be home to 21 species at risk including a population of Roosevelt Elk re-introduced to McNab Creek in 2001 by the BC Ministry of the Environment.

The concerns for Fish/fish habitat:

  1. The project's potential to cause serious harm to fish and fish habitat, due to changing hydrological patterns that would:
    • Affect the water and salinity levels in McNab Creek, As they dig down to remove gravel, the fresh water from the estuary will be siphoned into the pit, which will change the salinity of McNab Creek and impact the salmon runs.
    • Lead to salt water seeping into the estuary ground water – which would kill the plants there
  2. DFO is very worried about the fish and fish habitat in McNab Creek, particularly chum and coho salmon. The Vancouver Aquarium is concerned re the salmon, and re rockfish at the estuary mouth.
  3. The planned artificial salmon spawning channel would do nothing to compensate for the damage to fish and fish habitat in the McNab estuary.
  4. The effects of wet mining (digging the gravel out of water, where the estuary forest used to be):
    • Burnco's argument that there won't be dust because they're mining "wet" is also misleading because the dust just becomes silt. The silt will kill the plant and animal life in the estuary.
  5. The project will cause dust, noise and light pollution (both on land and at sea – on the dock) for wildlife, local residents and also for recreational users of the area.
  6. Would require SLRD to rezone this land, moving this land into industrial zoning forever.

Economically:

Burnco has not proven that their is a huge demand that cannot be met by existing quarries. In fact, my concern is that they are taking away work from BC Corporations and only looking to gain a foot into Howe Sound for the potential of bidding on work for Woodfibre LNG that would compete with existing businesses that employee people. Burnco's 12 full time jobs aren't worth it as they are not adding to the pool of jobs but just taking away existing jobs. So that nets zero employment benefit.

For those that reside in the area, 17 local residents, and 30 recreational properties, they stand to lose a quality of life they have enjoyed for years.

Burnco is not adding to the value of this area by their project. Howe Sound is a recreational playground that attracts tourism dollars because of the pristine nature it is in.

This Calgary based company is the only recipient of gain. Their websites boast areas that they have remediated successfully. However, it must be noted that they have never remediated a pristine environment. Who would hold them accountable?

The idea that they will build a berm of soil along the part of the creek closest to the gravel extraction, sounds good until you think about the dust and runoff from the berm will wash into the creek, and damage fish and insect life there. It will probably also silt up/kill fragile ancient glass sponges nearby in the ocean.

With what we know about the assets in Howe Sound from the David Suzuki project and the value of estuaries to the whole of Howe Sound, this project should not be provided with an EA certificate.

We ask the BCEAO to reject this project.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

Hello. Why, when we have seen Howe Sound come back by leaps and bounds (in terms of a healthy and sustainable environment for sea and land wildlife to once again flourish), would we even consider granting a company like BURNCO the chance to ruin the advances we have made to bring back such a vital ecosystem from human mistakes made in the past? I say no to steps backward and YES to continuing to champion the fish and other wildlife, AND also the human enjoyment, of a clean Howe Sound and McNab Creek estuary! BURNCO must not be allowed to ruin the years of work it has taken to get this sensitive ecological area back on its feet. Thank you.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

We all realize that haunt paying jobs in our corridor very important. The only problem here is that our salmon are being attacked ecologically from too many sources. Sorting out the salmon should be the first priority for our province. We must remember that salmon is the most important species in our province and we must do everything to protect them. Our province needs to start thinking more long term instead of doing what's good for us now. We need sustainable businesses and this can be done but we can't keep letting in these projects that are hurting our fish and our waters.

Tina Winterlik - Vancouver, British Columbia

Please for the sake our children and children's children do not allow this to happen.

Please watch the videos on this page:

Help Save Howe Sound- Only 2 days left https://tinawinterlik.blogspot.ca/2016/10/help-save-howe-sound-only-2-days-left.html

Jill Bingham-Daniels - Squamish, British Columbia

It would be irresponsible to add any more pressure to the ecosystem of Howe Sound. Our planet is warming and the sea levels will rise. Salmon need to be protected from any harm. The time has come to halt the wholesale destruction of our earth mearly for human greed.

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

This would be irresponsible to allow.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

Please do not build the Mcnab Creek gravel mine. I am deeply concerned about the ecological impacts on fish such as salmon who's spawning ground will be impacted, as well as species such as trout who frequent the Mcnab creek. I am also concerned about the impact on endangered species such as elk whose food sources would be impacted by the mine. Finally, the potential environmental impacts of a mine in Howe Sound would stifle its' recovery from former pollution due to mining and pulp mills.

I ask that you consider beyond the financial benefits and consider the long term environmental and ecological health of Howe Sound.

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

I am opposed to the Burnco Aggregate mine project. The negative environmental impact on Howe Sound and the salmon run are too great a risk to justify this project.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

This project should not be permitted to proceed. Howe Sound should be recognized as s UNESCO Biosphere Reserve. There is no place for an aggregate mine on the shores of this delicate ecosystem.

Michael lundrigan - Squamish, British Columbia

there is no need to choose this location really !!!the use of barges and boats to make gravel really people wake up has to be some place that doesn't involve howe sound or the ocean shore !! all the rock mountains and you have to pick a place next to the ocean and those big heavy trucks on a very busy part of the sea to sky highway !!!

Personal Information Withheld - Whistler, British Columbia

We need wild salmon and nature to thrive, not a gravel mine. No to this industrial site!

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

Marcy, Mike, Scott, and Will,

Lady and gentlemen of Burnco.

The pic attached was taken yesterday at McNab.

In this message please know that I am one of a significant group of citizens who live in Lions Bay, Howe Sound. We also, because of where we live, enjoy Howe Sound. Every summer, all summer, we take our families over to McNab Creek and enjoy this pristine area. It's not just us though, it's many people who live in what we all refer to as the Sea to Sky Corridor.

You would too if you lived here. You would also take your kids here, your kid's kids, and then they would begin the same cycle. The same, very positive cycle, of caring for this planet. Especially the places like McNab Creek.

Because of where you live, I can't expect you to really understand this.

When I read through all of your corporate history, one point stands out quite clearly. You care a lot about your family history.

Well we all do too. And you would if you lived here, and experienced what we all do.

No matter what you believe based on your studies, you will do harm to this area. I am saying you, because although you all work for a company, you directly are making this decision to try to bring your company's plant here.

Please go back to your families and look at your kids and grandkids and then quietly ask yourselves, would they understand your decision if you had been taking them to this special place since they were old enough to remember it, and your helped to degrade it?

You all know what the answer is.

Please, think about what you are doing in this context, not just about how much money you will make.

Attached Image

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

STOP. JUST STOP. NO. NO. NO Gravel pit, No heavy equipment, No tankers, No more destruction. No more death of our home, our animal friends, no more poison. No more greed/money/profit as the decision point on our futures. With all the information, statistics, reports and the strongly expressed sentiments of the people - wake up. Say No to death and Yes to Life.

Personal Information Withheld - Brackendale, British Columbia

To the EAO

please consider my objections to the proposed Burnco Project.

I'm not convinced that the project is in the best interests of the Howe Sound environment and community. The previous Fisheries assessment stated that the MacNabe creek would be rendered uninhabitable to wild fish stocks if Burnco goes ahead and this will continue to be the case despite their claims otherwise. Don't sacrifice Howe Sound as an important resource. The noise and light pollution, increased tug and barge traffic and foreshore habitat destruction will erode the enjoyment of the sound recreationaly at a time when the potential for increased tourism and subsequent economic benefit could eventually far outweigh the 12 jobs created by such an environmentally destructive form of industry.

Vancouver is so lucky to have such a world class marine Fjord and ecosystem capable of supporting a large and increasing number of fish, mammala and birds. Have you seen the Orca and Porpoises? It is only just now recovering from the last 100+ years of industrial activity and we can't just go backwards and start over. I'm pro industry. I work in industry and tourism I know the benefits of responsible sustainable recreation industry. This is just too small of an economic benefit to just a few people in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Thank you

Steve March - Gibsons, British Columbia

Cristy Clark, how long must we fight to stop this project and to stop the industrialization of Howe Sound. This is a pristine area that we can be proud of. Howe Sound is a through fair for whales, porpoises, and other marine life. It is also a tourist magnet to enjoy the scenery and fishing possibilities.

Please end this project.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vFzB1YSJcA4

Ray Mason - Pemberton, British Columbia

McNab Creek is an important fish spawning habitat in Howe sound. Gravel acts as a huge water sink which enables water in Mcnab creek to flow even during hot dry summers. This water flow is extremely important for all the organisms that live in and around McNab Creek. The value of keeping McNab Creek intact is more valuable than the value of the gravel.

Bernadette - Lions Bay, British Columbia

I am desperate if i hear that well educated (?) people and desicion makers are going to destroy Nature. Have you ever been to the Mc nab Creek? I dont think so because then You will think differently and wake up. Get out of the office and look around, you descision makers have to wake up!! You dont want to kill Nature instead of a couple of jobs. Lets be an example to all those nation and be the leader in say NO to killing Nature and Mc Nab Creek!

Sharon Ann Smith - Brackendale, British Columbia

I sincerely urge the Environmental Assessment offices of the provice of British Columbia and the Federal Government of Canada to NOT approve Burnco's application to opetate a gravel mine/quarry in the McNab Creek estuary of Howe Sound. The significant and devastating impacts on aquatic freshwater and oceanic life as well as the land based wildlife have been very well documented by many creditable sources including the Dept of Fisheries and Oceans. The impact on our environmentally recovering Howe Sound must not be underestimated. Decades of hardwork by many stakeholders have produced the results we see all around us in our beautiful Howe Sound. I have lived and worked here for 27 years. I worked in the industrial sector for many years and saw firsthand the damage done.

I have participated in the recovery and am committed to the restoration and maintenance of the Howe Sound ecosystem. This incredibly diverse area must be protected and preserved to sustain our wildlife and the health of our region. PLease do not approve this project.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

To Whom it may concern,

As a resident of Squamish and a person who enjoys Howe Sound for its' natural beauty, marine life, wildlife, recreation and tourism, I strongly oppose the proposed gravel mine at the Mcnab Creek Estuary. Please consider these points as follows:

  1. Why would anyone develop a gravel mine in Vancouver's ocean playground, an area of outstanding natural beauty? This is where an ever growing city comes to sail, dive, kayak, fish, camp and hike. Tourists flock from all over the world to see "SuperNatural, British Columbia", how would a gravel pit look in the tourism advertising?
  2. Howe Sound is only now showing encouraging signs of environmental recovery after decades of industrial misuse. Should we now allow a reindustrialization of the area?
  3. How can we consider developing a massive 77 hectare pit which will excavate the entire McNab estuary from one side of the valley to the other, completely eliminating one of only three river estuaries in Howe Sound, without developing an integrated, long term land and water use plan for the whole of Howe Sound?
  4. The size of the gravel pit will limit access to the foreshore for wildlife such as elk, deer and bears who currently frequent the area to forage for food.
  5. The excavation of the river estuary will dramatically change the movement of water through the valley and have a significant negative impact on the freshwater habitat.
  6. The proposed mine developer, Burnco, filed a judicial review application against DFO in BC Supreme Court to 'strong arm' the DFO to allow them to proceed to an environmental review. The DFO have since agreed to that review with serious concerns as "the project presents a high risk to Salmon and Salmon habitat".
  7. In addition to the destruction to fish habitat, Burnco's own consultants believe the mine site could be home to 21 species at risk including a population of Roosevelt Elk re-introduced to McNab Creek in 2001 by the BC Ministry of the Environment.
  8. The noise from the gravel crushing facility and loading of barges will be significant. It will have a negative impact on the enjoyment of the area by boaters, kayakers, fishermen, tourists and other in Howe Sound. The mine developer has stated at meetings that if the demand is there, they want to run the mining and crushing facilities 24/7, 365 days a year.
  9. Noise and light pollution will have significant negative impacts on the land and aquatic animals in the area. Noise and vibration pollution have been found to negatively impact the ability of marine mammals to communicate, navigate, find food and it is believed increasingly to impact their fertility.
  10. The mine will have an impact on the economic potential of the Howe Sound area. There is considerable potential in Howe Sound to continue to grow the tourism industry with significant economic multipliers that would accrue to the local economy. A mine is not going to add to the beauty of the area.

Thank you for understanding that a giant gravel mine is not suitable for this precious ecosystem, and certainly not the best example of land and wildlife management especially given the low number of long term jobs it would provide.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

I care about our salmon stocks, not gravel. This is a terrible idea.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

Our Family owns a cabin at mcnab creek. I spent my childhood fishing in the river and ocean, crabbing and pawning right where the proposed gravel mine would sit. This estuary would host elk, deer and bears (grizzly and black bear) which we would watch in their natural habitat.

The estuary also hosts lots of shell fish (oysters, clams, mussels etc). All theses species would lose their home if this project goes ahead

4. The size of the gravel pit will limit access to the foreshore for wildlife such as elk, deer and bears who currently frequent the area to forage for food.

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

My husband and I live in Lions Bay, which we think of as paradise. Living on the edge of Howe Sound is a privilege we do not take for granted.

We understand that business is business and that Burnco needs a product to sell. However, we cannot understand why they have chosen McNab Creek as a place to be dug out for gravel. It is hard to believe that the company will only run for 16 years and only a few hours a day after the effort and cost to create the gravel pit. It seems that this is what Burnco says to gain approval. Then after a few months, it will be much easier for them to quietly ask the government to keep the pit going for decades and start running even 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

The noise pollution alone will be an offence to anyone living in this amazing area. Simply put, sound travels so easily along waterways. Add in low marine cloud or fogs and the grating racket will become even more horrific. It is a fact that gravel pits are noisy; digging up rock is not a quiet pasttime. Anyone living near any gravel industry in the world will say the same thing.

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

Burnco Products proposed large scale gravel mine at McNab Creek (a fjord and unique estuary) at the northern end of Howe Sound, 77 hectares, (over 200 football fields) including an onsite crushing and processing plant that will produce a minimum of one million tonnes per year for 20 years, run 24 hours a day, every day of the year and employ minimal jobs and be built by the company's own crews from outside B.C. in an "ecologically friendly manner" is absolutely unacceptable!

How on earth can you justify the need for this proposed mine.? There are already other existing gravel mines in the area that service Vancouver. The aggregate production in no way validates the destruction of this salmon-bearing estuary. 12 or so jobs is not worth ithe ecological disruption and devistation to such a richly populated wildlife area including elk,, grizzly, wolves, black bears and plenty of other at-risk species

You have the authority to say no. My husband is in the resource business and our family understands the industry. This plant dies not make sense. Please use your common sense and do not allow this particular project to move ahead and find a new site that is less environmentally sensitive. Why does this government continue to bulldoze through projects like this that compromise the very ecosystem that we ultimately need to sustain life. This short sightedness is nothing less than negligence on the part of the governing bodies like yourselves that claim to be acting in the best interest of future generations. This project does not. The 5 members of our family ask that you deny this particular application.

E.R. Goetsch - Lions Bay, British Columbia

Here is my comment regarding the proposed Bunco operation:

"We moved to Lions Bay 48 years ago when Howe Sound had been biologically dead as a result of being used as a dump site for the Britannia Mine and Woodfibre Pulp Mill. Both operations provided hundreds of jobs for workers, so it was considered an "acceptable trade off" for the loss of the environment and the fishing industry.

Both operations are now shut down for years and nature has re-juvinated itself. Many species of wildlife, including dolphins, salmon, herring as well as grizzlies have returned and were widely hailed by the News Media and have become attractions for the tourist industry.

Is it now time to reverse the trend, by creating one or two dozens jobs at the expense of a much less invasive industry which supports hundreds of workers directly and indirectly?

I suggest this is NOT the correct way to go, as there are other suitable, less invasive gravel locations where the damage will be less evident."

Jamie Woodall - Bowen Island, British Columbia

As a resident of Bowen Island, and as a global citizen, I am greatly concerned about the obvious environmental damage which will occur as a result of the proposed McNab Creek gravel mine. This is a region which is an integral part of revival of the local ecosystems and the repopulation of many species at risk (salmon and elk).

As a parent, and as the owner of a company which teaches young adults about sustainability and global citizenship, I feel strongly about the legacy we are leaving for the generations who will raise their own grandchildren here. Having lived in Indonesia for years, I have witnessed the devastating repercussions of poor land management and its effect on the local human and animal populations.

My family and I are firmly opposed to the development of this mine and ask that you prioritize the protection of the environment and the health and safety of the citizens who live here.

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Being a 25 year resident of McNab Creek and having raised my 3 kids and now 3 grandchildren there, I would like to express my grave concern regarding the Burnco Aggregate Mine Proposal.

Hoping some of my fears would be alleviated by attending the Burnco Public Forum but unfortunately that proved to be unsuccessful. After talking to several Golder associates regarding the issues of pollution, noise, and wildlife it was clear to me that they could offer up studies of the area as it exists now but were very hesitant to commit to how it would be if this proposal goes through. When asking what the peak noise db levels during daily operation were as opposed to the average that they were displaying, I was told that he didn't know.

I decided to look up Burnco's Sound Power Levels of Project Operation Equipment and could see some disturbingly high db levels associated to motors in crush plant(121.7) and falling gravel from Grizzly screen (120). During the construction phase Vibratory Hammers will run for hours kicking out 128.9 db which needless to say is extremely loud. Obviously this is the kind of information Burnco doesn't want to put on their informational posters.

On every issue that Burnco is trying to address, the word mitigate is used. The Mirriam-Webster dictionary defines mitigate as "to make (something) less severe, harmful or painful". Those three words should never be used in connection with McNab Creek or the Howe Sound.

I am having trouble understanding the risk to reward that this proposal offers. It is unconscionable that in today's day and age, we would consider risking the health of the McNab Creek Estuary ecosystem which is enjoyed by thousands for the financial benefit of a private few. Quite simply there will be no reward for the people living and enjoying this area and all it has to offer if Burnco comes in.

Please do not let the power of Burnco's money enable them to bully their way through this application process. As you can see from all the other public comments, there are way too many concerns that have not been properly met.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

No no no major eye sore and the poor fish and water habitat

Teija Kovanen - Bowen Island, British Columbia

I believe that an estuary is an incredibly sensitive area to convert into a gravel mine. This project would displace/destroy diverse coastal wildlife and negatively impact the Howe Sound in numerous ways. I think it is important to stop the Burnco development and instead consider using another less sensitive area.

Alison Fischer - Lions Bay, British Columbia

Hi,

The following list summarizes my concerns. I think these issues need to be addressed seriously before this project proceeds.

  1. The gravel quarry would be hard on 21 species officially at risk - including Coastal Cutthroat Trout, and Roosevelt elk, which were re-introduced some years ago and are valued by hunters.
  2. Fish/fish habitat:
    1. The project's potential to cause serious harm to fish and fish habitat, due to changing hydrological patterns that would:
      • Affect the water and salinity levels in McNab Creek, As they dig down to remove gravel, the fresh water from the estuary will be siphoned into the pit, which will change the salinity of McNab Creek and impact the salmon runs.
      • Lead to salt water seeping into the estuary ground water – which would kill the plants there
    2. DFO is very worried about the fish and fish habitat in McNab Creek, particularly chum and coho salmon. The Vancouver Aquarium is concerned re the salmon, and re rockfish at the estuary mouth.
    3. The planned artificial salmon spawning channel would do nothing to compensate for the damage to fish and fish habitat in the McNab estuary.
  3. The effects of wet mining (digging the gravel out of water, where the estuary forest used to be):
    • Burnco's argument that there won't be dust because they're mining "wet" is also misleading because the dust just becomes silt. The silt will kill the plant and animal life in the estuary.
  4. The project will cause dust, noise and light pollution (both on land and at sea – on the dock) for wildlife, local residents and also for recreational users of the area.
  5. Would require SLRD to rezone this land, moving this land into industrial zoning forever.

Compare the benefits of this project: Profits for Burnco, and 12 full time jobs - to the above described serious harm of this project would cause.

Ray Mason - Pemberton, British Columbia

Gravel deposits act like a huge sponge storing water in the spring and releasing it the hot dry summer months. This water is estential for the eco system of McNab creek. Gravel mining can not be allowed to happen there. There are no mitigating actions that could replace the loss of the gravel.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

Howe Sound should be permanently closed to any type of industrial development. Anyone who has ever remotely explored this area knows it's fragile beauty and the enormous gift we have to enjoy right at our fingertips. If you have ever been to Texada island, there is a great example of what the surrounding area ends up like. NOT PRETTY. Not to mention the impact on the wildlife, whom will imminently be displaced from this area that is highly valuable to their existence. I say NO! Howe Sound is too valuable !

Gregory Pollard - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Dear Sirs/ Madam,

After viewing Bob Turners I think it complete insanity to build a gravel mine in Howe Sound,,, Anywhere ! Save Howe Sound !!

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

Burnco if allowed to extract and use this property should return that parcel back to the crown or create a park when they are finished rather than selling it off to some developer or commercial project like LNG. There is practically no public acess to land in Howe sound and mcnabb access should be protected for the public who use it and the animals that live there.

Mike Hyrman - Squamish, British Columbia

Burnco if allowed to extract and use this property should return that parcel back to the crown or create a park when they are finished rather than selling it off to some developer or commercial project like LNG. There is practically no public acess to land in Howe sound and mcnabb access should be protected for the public who use it and the animals that live there.

Rudi & Gillian Darling Kovanic - Howe Sound, British Columbia

October 1, 2014

BURNCO Aggregate Mine Project

Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency BC's Environmental Assessment Office

Attention: Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency and BC's Environmental Assessment Office Representatives, We are writing this letter to express our strong opposition to the Alberta/Texas aggregate company BURNCO's application to construct and operate an open pit sand/ gravel mine and crushing facility proposed in the estuary on the productive fish/salmon bearing McNab Creek on the northwest shore of Howe Sound. As very long time residents of Howe Sound, we are extremely concerned about the severely adverse impact such a project will have on McNab Creek and the overall health of Howe Sound's marine ecosystem. BURNCO indicates that the destruction of this sensitive fish habitat will be very profitable for it and create 12 full time jobs. But at what cost to the environment and sustainable economy of Howe Sound?

As you are aware, after decades of industrial abuse making Howe Sound North America's most toxic mining waste site, about $45 million of our tax payers dollars were spent cleaning up the Sound. Living on the shores of Howe Sound for almost 30 years, we have been delighted to see this investment of our tax dollars pay off with recovering fish populations and the concomitant recovery of sea mammal populations. While almost never seen in the first 15 to 20 years here, now almost weekly for the past decade we see cetaceans feeding. For example, last week we saw two rare false killer whales heading up Howe Sound. And a few days later we saw a vast, dense school of anchovies swimming along the shoreline. The size of this school was astonishing -- stretching over 220 feet in length, 50 feet wide and two to three feet depth. It's these rebounding stocks that are sustaining Howe Sound's recovering humpbacks and a myriad of other species.

BURNCO's own consultants have identified 21 species that are on the Species at Risk list that will be negatively impacted by this proposed open pit gravel mine in McNab Estuary.

In this age of rapid species disappearance and extinction across Canada and around our planet, can you imagine a more heartening and positive environmental story than the 'Great Howe Sound Recovery' and just 20 kilometers from Canada's the third largest city. For once, a positive story and in the backdoor 'play ground' to be enjoyed by Vancouver's 2.5 million people. Breath-taking!

However, as we also witness daily, this recovery is still extremely fragile. Howe Sound remains largely unprotected and with no long term land use plan. Caught between many different political jurisdictions and impacted by rapidly rising ocean temperatures and acidification, the fragile ecosystem of Howe Sound remains at risk; with highly unusual and unprecedented marine occurrences like starfish wasting disease that continues to cause mysterious and dramatic die-offs along the Pacific coast from Mexico to Alaska including Howe Sound. Dr. Martin Haulena, veterinarian for the Vancouver Aquarium recently said, "This (wasting disease) is, if not THE, certainly one of the biggest wildlife die-offs that have ever been recorded, and we're not just talking marine die-offs." The summer of 2016 also saw a highly unusual and unprecedented explosion of phytoplankton causing the waters of Howe Sound (and Georgia Straight) to turn bright, almost florescent green.

While the causes of these alarming phenomenon are still be investigated, scientists agree on the scale of the problem and say evidence points to rising ocean acidification.

The impact of the noise, light and air pollution and the ugly scar of an open pit mine in one of the most beautiful fjords in the world and a BC landmark on the Sea to Sky corridor, will be immense. The economic benefits to BURNCO are evident, but the potentially negative economic impacts to other sectors are significant. It will damage BC's multi-billion dollar tourism industry, as well as having a negative impact on the recreational and commercial fishers, tourism operators, boaters, resident and recreational property owners and numerous children's camps with, literally thousands of campers each year that currently enjoy Howe Sound's ecosystem. There is a great potential in Howe Sound to continue to grow the tourism industry with significant economic multipliers that could accrue to the local economy. The area is used extensively by the movie and TV production sector for filming.

Reindustrialization would put this at risk and, as taxpayers and residents, we are absolutely not prepared to take this risk.

SUMMARY OF OBJECTIONS:

  1. Why would anyone develop a gravel mine in Vancouver's ocean playground, an area of outstanding natural beauty? This is where an ever growing city comes to sail, dive, kayak, fish, camp and hike. Tourists flock from all over the world to see "SuperNatural, British Columbia", how would a gravel pit look in the tourism advertising?
  2. Howe Sound is only now showing encouraging signs of environmental recovery after decades of industrial misuse. Is this not a political and environmental travesty to allow a reindustrialization of the area after millions of dollars of public funds have been committed to its recovery?
  3. How can we consider developing a massive 77-hectare pit which will excavate the entire McNab estuary from one side of the valley to the other, completely eliminating one of only three river estuaries in Howe Sound, without developing an integrated, long term land and water use plan for the whole of Howe Sound?
  4. The size of the gravel pit will limit access to the foreshore for wildlife such as elk, deer and bears who currently frequent the area to forage for food.
  5. The excavation of the river estuary will dramatically change the movement of water through the valley and have a significant negative impact on the freshwater habitat.
  6. The proposed mine developer, BURNCO, filed a judicial review application against DFO in BC Supreme Court to 'strong arm' the DFO to allow them to proceed to an environmental review. The DFO have since agreed to that review with serious concerns as "the project presents a high risk to Salmon and Salmon habitat".
  7. In addition to the destruction to fish habitat, BURNCO's own consultants believe the mine site could be home to 21 species at risk including a population of Roosevelt Elk re-introduced to McNab Creek in 2001 by the BC Ministry of the Environment.
  8. The noise from the gravel crushing facility and loading of barges will be significant. It will have a negative impact on the enjoyment of the area by boaters, kayakers, fishermen, tourists and others in Howe Sound. The mine developer has stated at meetings that if the demand is there, they want to run the mining and crushing facilities 24/7, 365 days a year for 16 years.
  9. Noise and light pollution will have significant negative impacts on the land and aquatic animals in the area. Noise and vibration pollution have been found to negatively impact the ability of marine mammals to communicate, navigate, find food and it is believed increasingly to impact their fertility.
  10. The mine will have a negative impact on the economic potential of the Howe Sound area. There is considerable potential in Howe Sound to continue to grow the tourism industry with significant economic multipliers that would accrue to the local and provincial economy. A mine absolutely will not add to the beauty of the area but only severely detract.

The local residents of this area (and beyond) are committed to preserve the marine ecological viability and sustainability of our treasured Howe Sound. However, at this point, and for very justifiable reasons, we are extremely sceptical and disillusioned by the provincial and federal environmental review processes being applied provincially and federally. The environmental review process for another potentially hugely damaging re-industrialization project in Howe Sound, Woodfibre LNG, was the first to be approved after the 2015 election of the Trudeau Liberal government. Despite the new government's promises to revamp this process before putting such projects to the test, they used the extant, deeply flawed Harper Government environmental review process and gave the project the go-ahead. We, the public were not heard, thus giving democracy in our country a very black eye.

The scientific research done (by the proponents themselves) for that project was deeply flawed as was the assessment of the actual fisheries values of Howe Sound. Also the public comments received for that project were the highest number of public submissions for any project in the history of Canada and over 94% of these submissions were opposed to the project. Absolutely no social license was granted for that industrial project for Howe Sound by the vast majority of the 12,000 residents who live here, exposing a ugly tear in our democratic process.

This project has previously been turned down twice for consideration by the Province of BC. And now with threats from climate change and its impact upon our ecosystem, it's even less appropriate and justifiable. For this reason we are requesting that the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency and the BC Environmental Assessment office fulfill their mandate as true environmental assessors and turn down this unacceptable open pit gravel mine proposal for McNab Creek, Howe Sound. A NO decision will go a long way to restoring our faith in the review process and our government agencies.

Thank you for your attention to this critical issue.

Julia Watson - Gambier Island, British Columbia

Re: Burnco Aggregate Project

As a property owner in Howe Sound I am opposed to the Burnco mining project. McNab Creek Estuary provides nutrient rich stream waters that fertilize the ocean and create rich and productive ecologies. It is a delicate ecosystem still recovering from past logging. Approval of the Burnco proposal will return the area to an industrial zone.

Despite Burnco's proposed mitigation measures, damage to this recovering ecosystem will be unavoidable.

Environmental Concerns:

  • Damage to salmon, herring and other marine life
  • Noise from gravel crushing affecting wild life
  • Disruption to the elk, an at risk species
  • Lighting during construction and operation causing further disruption to life in the area
  • Compromised air quality due to emissions
  • Increased barge traffic in Howe Sound
  • Overall damage to the estuary and surrounding area that comes with industrial development

Howe Sound has been returning to its natural beauty, creating tourism, recreational opportunities and vibrant communities. We have seen the return of dolphins and whales, indicators of ecological recovery. The Burnco Aggregate Project does not fit our values. Please say no to this project and preserve the delicate ecosystem of Howe Sound and its diverse local economies.

JLR Hughes - West Vancouver, British Columbia

With due negotiation on measures to minimize local impact on recreational activities this historic quarry should be allowed to proceed. Howe Sound is not a residential suburb or Provincial Park.

I am a recreational boater on our coast and particularly Howe Sound since 1940, a yacht club member for 52 years (now 88 years old) and still boating in Howe Sound, where there still is considerable industrial activity, merchant ships and ferries. Economic production of quarry rock where it occurs is important to our free enterprise construction industry. It is very evident that many kayaks and even standup boards are common in Howe Sound and are not daunted by the variety of other traffic. The yacht clubs across from the quarry are naturally particularly unhappy about the proposal, and maximum mitigation should be applied.

Apart from that, there are not a large number of residents and cottages on the Howe Sound islands. There is an authorized logging operation proceeding on Gambier Island not far from the subject quarry.

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

I think it's a horrible idea that Burnco wants to build a gravel pit on one of the last estuaries around and it will effect animals, surrounding cabins and docks in the area with loud noises and barges coming in and out. Not to mention the salmon run in the creek will be disrupted and potentially destroyed. This area is enjoyed by many, go extend a current gravel pit if need be, do not create one on this beautiful land for really no reason.

Stephen Zimmerman - McNab Creek, British Columbia

Noise and Vibration study completely voids peak volume readings. Peak volume readings are very important in an environment assessment, As someone who is neighboring the project, What exactly I am going to be listening too?. Peak volumes should be available in an environmental assessment of this scale.

Glenda Sewards - Gibsons, British Columbia

Please don't approve BURNCO Rock Products application to build a large scale open pit gravel mine in the McNab Creek Valley in Howe Sound. There has already been widespread opposition to this project and we don't understand how they can apply again when they have already been turned down. A large scale open pit gravel mine will threaten the McNab Creek estuary which is vital habitat for salmon and other species at risk. Please deny their request.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

I do not want to see this kind of damaging industry in this beautiful natural area. We are finally beginning to see significant recovery of important habitat and species here and this is another Ill considered proposal that will hurt, not help in this recovery.

Shas Cho - Boston Bar, British Columbia

The time has come to stop raping the earth for profits and to protect our land, water, air and animals.

Let's celebrate our pristine creeks and rivers rather than selling them to the greediest bidder.

Please DENY this application.

Thank you.

Personal Information Withheld - Hazelton, British Columbia

Salmon habitat is crucial to our needs. There are other places to get gravel that do not cause as much disaster.

Paul Akerhielm, P.Eng - Lions Bay, British Columbia

I am strongly against the proposal to site a gravel mine on Howe Sound

Attached File

Justin Finn - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Please do not allow Burnco to proceed with this project in any way. The destruction of salmon and marine riparian habitat is a major issue. Noise and greenfield development issues, as well as a lack of situation the development within a greater development framework for Howe Sound are further reasons to not approve the project

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

Howe Sound should never get industrialized again. How can a proposal like this one even be on the table. Why do we need to invest our time again and again to tell this government that Howe Sound should be protected.

  1. Why would anyone develop a gravel mine in Vancouver's ocean playground, an area of outstanding natural beauty? This is where an ever growing city comes to sail, dive, kayak, fish, camp and hike. Tourists flock from all over the world to see "SuperNatural, British Columbia", how would a gravel pit look in the tourism advertising?
  2. Howe Sound is only now showing encouraging signs of environmental recovery after decades of industrial misuse. Should we now allow a reindustrialization of the area?
  3. How can we consider developing a massive 77 hectare pit which will excavate the entire McNab estuary from one side of the valley to the other, completely eliminating one of only three river estuaries in Howe Sound, without developing an integrated, long term land and water use plan for the whole of Howe Sound?
  4. The size of the gravel pit will limit access to the foreshore for wildlife such as elk, deer and bears who currently frequent the area to forage for food.
  5. The excavation of the river estuary will dramatically change the movement of water through the valley and have a significant negative impact on the freshwater habitat.
  6. The proposed mine developer, Burnco, filed a judicial review application against DFO in BC Supreme Court to 'strong arm' the DFO to allow them to proceed to an environmental review. The DFO have since agreed to that review with serious concerns as "the project presents a high risk to Salmon and Salmon habitat".
  7. In addition to the destruction to fish habitat, Burnco's own consultants believe the mine site could be home to 21 species at risk including a population of Roosevelt Elk re-introduced to McNab Creek in 2001 by the BC Ministry of the Environment.
  8. The noise from the gravel crushing facility and loading of barges will be significant. It will have a negative impact on the enjoyment of the area by boaters, kayakers, fishermen, tourists and other in Howe Sound. The mine developer has stated at meetings that if the demand is there, they want to run the mining and crushing facilities 24/7, 365 days a year.
  9. Noise and light pollution will have significant negative impacts on the land and aquatic animals in the area. Noise and vibration pollution have been found to negatively impact the ability of marine mammals to communicate, navigate, find food and it is believed increasingly to impact their fertility.
  10. The mine will have an impact on the economic potential of the Howe Sound area. There is considerable potential in Howe Sound to continue to grow the tourism industry with significant economic multipliers that would accrue to the local economy. A mine is not going to add to the beauty of the area.

How can you help?

Howe Sound needs to be protected for the enjoyment of both current and future generations so we are asking you to be an ambassador for Howe Sound in telling the government that you support the recovery of Howe Sound.

Let's be smart and think of ways how to protect this place and not re-industrialize it again.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

if the risks can be mitigated, then I am in favour, if it creates jobs for local people.

Laurie Parkinson - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

A regional demand for additional aggregate has not been demonstrated.

The Vancouver market requirement for an additional gravel and aggregate source is not supported by the proponent's documentation. A greater profit margin for the proponent should not be grounds for destroying the estuary of McNab Creek.

A supply/demand report showing strong evidence of the need for supply from this location (and the unavailability of supply from established locations), such as has been done for the Okanagan region, should be prepared before considering a permit for this project. See: https://www.regionaldistrict.com/media/112368/2013_11_08___Full_Report___Aggregate_Supply_and_Demand_Update_and_Analysis.pdf

Loss of productive salmon habitat.

The project has (twice) been rejected by Fisheries and Oceans Canada because of the likely loss of salmon habitat in McNab Creek. In a year of disastrous returns to the Fraser River and other runs, this proposal is ill-timed and ill-advised.

The Precautionary Principle, properly applied, should see this proposal firmly rejected.

Loss of both salmon and protected rock fish habitat.

Vancouver Aquarium VP Jeff Marliave confirmed in a 2014 interview with Larry Pynn that the McNab Creek estuary is relatively pristine. There are unmapped creeks with coho salmon in the McNab Valley that gravel extraction will kill. There are lots of rockfish that live at the dropoff right off the estuary. The rock fish habitat would be damaged by this operation.

From reading the mitigation for salmon proposed by Burnco, it's obvious that much more salmon habitat would be eliminated than would be created....and the new salmon habitat might not work. There is no mention of mitigation for rock fish habitat.

Use the precautionary principle well, and reject this proposal.

Unsuitable location.

This proposal would locate a noisy, dusty gravel mine and crush mill next to an existing multi-residential area.

To do so would represent atrocious planning, with little/no obvious compensating factors. It should not be permitted.

Insufficient data for at-risk species baselines.

For several key aquatic and land-based species (such as anadromous salmon, resident cutthroat trout, and Roosevelt elk), population data was collected over far too narrow a timespan to be useful for establishing accurate baselines. Without accurate baselines, quantitative monitoring for the effects of this project will not be possible.

Part-year data is utterly insufficient to establish accurate baselines. At least 5 years of data should be collected to afford accurate baselines usable for ongoing monitoring of effects on species populations and habitat. Local authorities (ie SCRD) should have the power to compel a reduction, suspension, or cessation of mine activities where habitat damage exceeds pre-arranged norms.

21 species are officially at risk from Burnco

Burnco's consultants documented that the gravel quarry could be home to 21 species officially at risk. This includes Roosevelt elk, re-introduced to McNab Creek in 2001 by the BC Ministry of the Environment.

The Precautionary Principle, properly applied, should see this proposal firmly rejected.

Will McNab Creek and the estuary become salty if the gravel quarry is built?

As rock is removed from the mine, fresh water from the estuary will creek into the resulting huge pit (100 football fields wide and 10 stories deep). This will lead to salt water seeping into the estuary, and into McNab Creek. This will kill a variety of salmon, as well as plants that live in the estuary.

Have thorough hydro-logical studies done over several years. Use the precautionary principle. Local authorities (eg SCRD) should have the power to compel a reduction, suspension, or cessation of mine activities where salination exceeds pre-agreed norms.

Yuko Godoy-Toku - Lions Bay, British Columbia

Please save the beautiful Howe sound.

It is for all our future.

Jim Whitworth - Ucluelet, British Columbia

Yes, It's a great idea to trash the environment, to make money for the big corporations. I mean what's more important clean water, air you breathe and land that sustains life or a stinking big pile of money for the ever greedy wealthy? I guess that question has been answered by the actions of the current government. Big money,at least in B.C. aces the environment every time.

Davina Dube - Vancouver, British Columbia

I am concerned with the wildlife, and fish habitat that Burnco Aggreate will be destroying if this project goes along. Not to mention the Salmon spawning habitat up the McNab Creek. We need to protect all of our Salmon habitat that we have left. It is critical that we protect the Howe Sound. With the millions of dollars invested in the clean up of Howe Sound and the reestablishment of an elk herd in the area it would seem to be a waste of tax payer money to just go destroy it all over again. The estuary and Howe Sound bring millions of tourist in the region every year. It is not worth losing that and destroying prime habitat.

Annie - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Stop the gravel mine please

Diane Hofler - Halfmoon Bay, British Columbia

Please don't allow the building of a gravel pit in this pristine area. I see the big freighters coming and going in the Sechelt area. Not what our tourist dollars want to look at. Tourist come for the beauty of our province. We can accept the freighters in Vancouver Harbour not Howe Sound.

Janey Cruise - Bowen Island And Kits Point, British Columbia

Howe Sound is now a pristine waterway again thanks to all the environmental protection that has happened Today I saw a little school of dolphins in Collingwood Channel. The killer whales are back. The herring are back. Salmon is back. NO OPEN PIT mining anywhere near Howe Sound....

John Dudley - Lions Bay, British Columbia

After years of pollution caused by the Britannia mine and pulp mill at Woodfibre Howe Sound is starting to recover and marine and bird life are returning.

It would be madness to allow any more re-industrialization of the Sound and along with the proposed LNG plant at Woodfibre destroys our governments credibility for being at all concerned about our environment.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

After a review of the proponents project documents I am concerned that the project will have significant impact on a productive estuary and only result in a few local jobs. The McNabb Creek area is a key eco-system for juvenile salmon, herring and wintering migratory birds. There is very little riparian or foreshore buffer planned. The extraction of gravel will affect groundwater flows into and out of the creek. The potential for damage to the estuary by silt, noise and foreshore activities (oil, fuel or hydraulic fluid spills, light pollution, vibration) is significant. The project will have large and irreversible impacts on residents and recreational use of Howe Sound. The loss of residents property values is a significant moral issue for the proponents.

There is no discussion of what will happen to the sediment load in the mined out pit when the creek berm is overwhelmed by storm flows. These will be deposited over the eel grass beds, smothering the estuary. The addition of site lighting will spoil the only area of dark night skies readily accessible from Metro Vancouver (Porteau Cove Park). Is the loss of the natural amenities of the area worth a few more dollars for the family interests that own Burnco?

Personal Information Withheld - Gibsons, British Columbia

Please do not destroy the beautiful Howe Sound. It is crazy to be thinking of developing such a massive project. Our environment is our treasure for the future. Enjoy and promote our natural beauty instead of destroying it for the sake of off shore dollars.

Tim Agg - Vancouver, British Columbia

After many years, I recently had the opportunity to revisit this area of Howe Sound. I've read and share the environmental concerns that have bee expressed by several organizations. I can see no pressing economic reason that should prevail over environmental and aesthetic concerns. Howe Sound and its few rivers need to be returned to their original richness of habitat for land animals and fish; and to be saved primarily for recreational purposes.

Kelly Heilig - Squamish, British Columbia

Howe Sound is in recovery. The herring are back and therefore so are many other species. This is a huge gravel mine that can have a serious impact on this ecosystem. When will we put our country first and value the natural environment over industry? The size of the mine is ridiculous. Have Burnco find another site away from the water!

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

As a longtime resident of Howe Sound the Burnco Aggregate Project is a very bad idea.

Samantha Taylor - Lions Bay, British Columbia

It would be ridiculous to build a large scale open pit gravel mine in the McNab Creek Valley in Howe Sound, especially considering widespread opposition. This threatens the McNab Creek estuary which is vital habitat for salmon and other species at risk. Stop threatening my home!

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

I am opposed to this project due to the negative effect it will have on the eco system of the Sound.

Personal Information Withheld - Burnaby, British Columbia

Please do not approve the BURNCO gravel mine. We need our water and our fish, and this mine would put them in danger.

Personal Information Withheld - Brackendale, British Columbia

I am opposed to this!! Leave the beauty of the Howe Sound intact!!!

Linda - Squamish, British Columbia

To whom it may concern.

We have just moved to Howe Sound area. It is one of the most beautiful places in the world and big companies like you and governments just want blow everything up and kill the wildlife and forests.

Leave it alone or Earh will no longer be here for you kids on grandkids..etc.

jane Hambrook - Vancouver, British Columbia

What is the matter with people's thinking. When are you all going to listen to what's happening to our world's environments. We need to put an end to scraping up mountains and their estuaries and their watersheds and their natural mechanisms. There are other alternatives even if they take longer or cost more. What the Burnco Aggregate Project destroys now for and equitable cost will be paid for by the environment forever. Can you all not read the environmental information available, can you all not comprehend what you have learnt about environments, can you all live with knowing that you're cheating the future and actually killing things we don't even understand yet? To date WE ONLY HAVE ONE PLANET,that's it, just one.

Would love to see alternate and sustainable solutions seriously thought about, developed and implemented for out gravel needs. Think of me as naive a dreamer or just plain ignorant of the gravel industry, I'm okay with that, but I'm not okay with destroying any part of The Howe Sound's environment.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

My family and I have no objection to this project. We all need gravel.

Lea Allen - Bowen Island, British Columbia

I do not want this gravel mine to proceed. As a tax payer I do not want to have this development operating in the successful Sea to Sky tourist area. This is the wrong place to be digging up gravel!

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

I oppose the project for an open pit gravel mine in McNab Creek Valley. Whatever cherry-picked "experts" may claim (remember that experts have their biases and affiliations), this project would devastate the local salmon and bird habitats, which are critical to BC's coastal ecosystems.

September 30, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

I am opposed to this development - like most people living in this area. YOU know its environmentally unsound s0 I wonder why you are going ahead

Valerie Bernier - Squamish, British Columbia

Please stop the gravel pit from establishing in McNAb Creek area. It will destroy this very important and rich pristine ecosystem.

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

please keep industry out of Howe Sound. The whales and dolphins have finally returned to this area after 40 years. We live and boat in this area weekly, and it should be preserved for recreation and tourism.

james dahmer - Squamish, British Columbia

just stop it. we dont need this.

Personal Information Withheld - Shirley, British Columbia

Salmon habitat at risk.It's a NO GO ZONE for resource extraction.

Jon Povill - Lions Bay, British Columbia

Howe Sound is only now finally recovering from decades of environmental abuse. The proposed gravel mine at McNabb Creek would renew the policy of sacrificing irreplaceable habitat for very minimal economic gain -- and whatever that gain might be, it would be more than eliminated if the operators of the mine were to fail to restore the area to its natural state after the mining operation. If the company were to go out of business, the province and its taxpayers would be left holding the bag. I strongly oppose the mine. I live just across the sound from its location and I would have to put up with its noise and light pollution in addition to the knowledge that it would be destroying elk, salmon and orca habitat. The only beneficiaries of this project would be the owners of the Burnco Corporation, not the local communities, not the wildlife, and not the province. Unless Burnco is willing to put up a bond of tens of millions of dollars to guarantee the restora tion of the habitat, this project should not even receive consideration. And even if such a bond is offered, the disruption to the ecosystem, the noise and unsightliness of the site, along with the loss of value in tourism and filming location fees all speak to the undesirability of this project. Please do not grant it an approval.

Donna Patrick - Gibsons, British Columbia

I am not in favour of theirs mine. The environment will be ruined. There will be no more singleness in this channel. This is the wrong kind of industry for this area. . Do not allow this.

Personal Information Withheld - Victoria, British Columbia

12 jobs are not worth it! Stop Bunco Aggregate Project McNab Creek currently hosts bald eagles Eagle surveying for a meal , Roosevelt Elk , and an estuary flourishing with marine life . Burnco's consultants identified 23 species at risk that this mine would threaten. The Departments of Fisheries and Oceans expressed strong concern about the project's impact to fish and fish habitat, particularly chum and coho salmon.

Personal Information Withheld - Gibsons, British Columbia

Burnco is a responsible proponent. I believe they can operate safely and protect the environment. I believe it's a good fit for McNab Creek and Howe Sound. BC needs jobs for the people and tax revenues- this provides both. I support the project for those reasons.

John Phillips- Lions Bay, British Columbia

This project must not proceed. We have spent 20 years cleaning up Howe Sound. We are just starting to see the benefits of this work - more Orcas, Dolphins and Salmon coming in to feed on the new populations of herring and other small fish.

There is an opportunity to turn Howe Sound into a UNESCO World Heritage site. This will have far greater economic benefits than any industrial activities.

Future generations will judge us. Once an ecosystem is damaged it may not ever be recovered or it may take 10's or 100's of years.

Please do not approve this project which is not wanted by anybody in the region.

There is no social licence.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

I oppose the Burnco mine proposal.

Ken Money - Squamish, British Columbia

This should be stopped. We do not need this so close to the sound.

Personal Information Withheld - Gibsons, British Columbia

Burnco is a responsible proponent. I believe they can operate safely and protect the environment. I believe it's a good fit for McNab Creek and Howe Sound. BC needs jobs for the people and tax revenues- this provides both. I support the project for those reasons.

Emilie Montgomery - Lions Bay, British Columbia

Today Sept 30 2016 we witnessed a Herd of wild elk in Howe Sound, at McNab Creek

our wildlife must be continually protected if we wish to have them around for future generations.

Image

Lynn Wilbur - North Vancouver, British Columbia

We are going down the wrong road here. Howe Sound must be protected. National Park status is required. Vancouverites need wild places. Not another Burrard Inlet! !!

Personal Information Withheld - Gibsons, British Columbia

Burnco is a responsible proponent. I believe they can operate safely and protect the environment. I believe it's a good fit for McNab Creek and Howe Sound. BC needs jobs for the people and tax revenues- this provides both. I support the project for those reasons.

D sage - Squamish, British Columbia

Stop this from happening period.money,money money,I'm sick of it.save these special places!!!

Gerald Cullen - Vancouver, British Columbia

Howe Sound is still recovering after a very long period with industrial activity affecting the sound. Mining, pulp mills, and logging caused widespread pollution dating from the early 1900's. The recovery is still underway. It is absolutely ridiculous that a huge step backwards would be taken to permit Burnco to operate a quarry in this estuary. I'm against this gross intrusion of industrial activity into a key recreational area for minimal positive economic impact.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

Please consider the damage to the health of our natural resources the Burnco Aggregate mine will cause. The McNab Creek Estuary is a sensitive area that sustains life for Salmon an a large variety of plant and animal species. Onece the damage is done reversing it will not be easy. There are abundant aggregate sites away from this sensitive area please use them.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

Noooooll !!! Don't put more heavy machinery on our highway !!!! It's already so dangerous

Dr. K. L. Funt - Horseshoe Bay, West Vancouver, British Columbia

My family lives directly on Howe Sound. I would like to express our very strong opposition to the McNab Creek Estuary proposal to start a gravel pit. Howe Sound is Vancouver's natural treasure. It is beyond beautiful and exceeds the fjords of Norway in tourist potential. B.C. and Canada should make it a National Park, not exploit it for short term natural resource extraction gain. This would be national insanity.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

I love the ocean life that's coming back In recent years. Imagine what it become if we let it. 100 years from now no one will give a shot about a gravel mine but the marine life keeps the planet alive

Nathaniel Berger - Vancouver, British Columbia

The McNab creek area is a beautiful place. There should not be mines there, that would ruin it.

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Why BC is allowing corporations to develop such energy intensive, environmentally destructive, economically unjustifiable projects to ruin the places people come to admire, play and enjoy? Is there any land in BC that is off limits, protected and preserved for the future generation? Who should be hold accountable for turning BC into a devastated Third World barren ground with these insane projects?

Rosemary Hart - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Please not in my backyard! Howe Sound is recouvering from copper leached for years from The Britannia Mine. The worst disaster in North America! All the sea life died, everything!

Roy ramage - Squamish, British Columbia

I believe the gravel works plant team has done Their due diligence and there should be no reason Not to continue with the planned gravel pit As laid out

Lea Bancroft - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Hydrology – McNab Valley Environmental Watershed Sustainability

With all due respect there does not seem to be a clear logical understanding of how the tidal estuary water flows will be maintained while balancing the pit/pond level requirements over the life of the project or into the future.

The proponent's initial proposal was to form a trench/creek above the road on the west side of the property that would collect both surface and subsurface water draining from the west side of the valley. This collected water flow was then to be controlled via overflow weirs to satisfy the hydraulic requirements of both the pit/pond and the tidal estuary.

Following the initial Public Open House session wherein we asked how the pit/pond replenishment requirements of roughly 230,000 US gallons per day would be met it now appears that the previous scheme has been abandoned. At the most recent Public Open House is was stated by Golder's hydrologist that the water coming off the west side of the valley is both insufficient in volume and of insufficient quality to meet the project water requirements. The level of the pit/pond will now be maintained by subsurface water flows coming directly down out of the McNab valley that are supposedly far in excess of the pit/pond requirements. The remaining subsurface water flows are then supposed to flow under/through the berm/dam structure (purple lined area on the Proposed Conceptual Site Layout diagram) to maintain the current water flow distribution over the existing tidal estuary.

With this latest concept in mind we respectfully have the following questions:

1. BURNCO's original proposal described the existing gravel fish channel acting as a "French Drain" on the subsurface water flow in this area of the McNab valley, thereby literally draining the natural water table in this area of the lower McNab valley. Looking at the proponents subsurface water table maps/charts this fish channel does appear to be a roughly the lowest point in the valley water table which tends to agree with BURNCO's description that it drains the valley. However, the proponent's initial excavation area is shown in relatively elevated porous ground on the west side of this site that appears to be considerably above the fish channel elevation. During these initial project phases how does the proponent expect to maintain the pit/pond level if the existing fish channel tends to dry up during the summer months? Will the initial pit be excavated to a depth below the fish channel using conventional excavation equipment which will then tend to furth er drain the existing fish channel into the excavated pit/pond.

2. BURNCO's proposal is to construct a dam on the fish channel towards the middle of the project to raise the water table behind the berm in order to maintain the pit/pond operating level (replenishing 226,921 Gallons Per Day for 365 days of the year). The excess volume of the subsurface water will then continue to flow under/through the berm to distribute the flows to the tidal estuary area and creeks. With seasonal variation in drainage flow requirements how will the water table level be controlled to suit the dredge requirements without allowing the pit/pond water to flow freely over the dam? You can't adjust the hydrostatic head created by the pond level while maintaining the pit/pond level for optimum dredging purposes.

3. As the size of the pit/pond is increased in both coverage and depth an ever increasing volume of the existing "subsurface" material will be removed (down to bedrock?). As this occurs an increasing volume of the subsurface water will then actually flow through the open pit/pond (confirmed by Golder). Over the 16 years of operation the fines will accumulate in the pit/pond water when the finer materials that are not removed by the dredging remain or flow back into the pit/pond along with any rock crushing dust that may find its way into the pond. These accumulated fines will then settle preferentially on the "downstream" side of the pond when carried by the subsurface water flowing through the pond towards the ocean. This ongoing deposition of fines on the downstream side of the pond over the 16 year life of the project will seriously reduce or eliminate the porosity of the pond's downstream wall thereby seriously limiting any subsurface drainage out of the p ond to the tidal estuary area. As the pit/pond is expanded to its full proposed size (covering the lower area of the McNab valley) the accumulated settled fines could significantly restrict this high volume subsurface flow draining out of the McNab valley which could then breach the proposed flood control dam and/or overflow the berm with poor quality pit/pond water carrying the accumulated fines. How does the proponent intend to address the issue of decreasing the porosity of the pond perimeter walls over time that are required to maintain the ongoing underflow and filtration of subsurface water passing through the pit/pond to the tidal estuary as the pit/pond is expanded to its proposed maximum size that literally fills the bottom of the McNab valley? If the existing subsurface water outflows are restricted and this high water volume is now going to flow to the ocean via McNab Creek how will this affect the creek water velocity and erosion problems during high drainage flood conditions?

4. Will the proponent's water filtration plant have the capacity to remove the fine suspended solids from the volume of subsurface water draining out of the McNab Valley that could pass through the final size of the pit/pond reservoir and if so how long will BURNCO maintain this filtration equipment?

5. The Province of BC has recently changed its regulations regarding "Dam Structures". Will the proposed berm be built to these revised Dam Structure standards to ensure present and future stability, or will it simply be built up as an earthen berm.

BURNCO Pit-Pond Water Volume Requirements

Ken McMaster - Surrey, British Columbia

I have summered on Anvil Island for over fifty years now and have in recent years witnessed the return of dolphin and orca populations as a result of new regulations that have improved the water quality in Howe Sound. I have fished off McNabb Creek for Pink Salmon. I think it would be a tragedy to allow the Bunco Aggregate Mine Project to go ahead.

I urge you to deny this request.

Jo Phillips - Sooke, British Columbia

No mines in McNabb Creek in Howe Sound. Business is not the most important thing in the world. Preserving the natural ecosystem that nurtures us is crucial to all of our survival. This is a crucial habitat. Please actually assess the environment which is the task we have trusted you with.

Reg Allen - West Vancouver, British Columbia

It is my strong opinion that the Burnco aggregate removal project in Howe Sound is an unfortunate example of incredible poor land management. It is not in concert with the Sound communities and is a retrograde step environmentally.

An aggregate mine has surely to be one of the worst activities to site in such an area. The proposed volume of aggregate removal will cumulatively impact this recovering environment through dust generation, removal of vegetation, aquatic, noise and visual disturbance, to name but a few. The latest Golder study, though extensive in some areas still contains considerable weakness in its assumptions and methodology.

We understand that Burnco claim that the Sound's use over the last one hundred years has been one of industrial activity. This is a shameful statement as we the public and you the government have over recent years made such tremendous strides in its reparation. It is now becoming once again a beautiful natural Lower Mainland asset that we can have pride in, and visitors can admire.

We urge the government to deny approval to a project of this nature. It has little economic upside outside of Burnco's profitability and yet has so much impact and risk to this scenic and natural environment on our doorstep.

In summary a regional plan for the development of Howe Sound is crucial, it would enable criteria and guide lines for any proposed activities and avoid long expensive processes such as we are involved in at the moment.

Susan Quipp - Victoria, British Columbia

NO, NO, NO. After the great return to ecological health after the industrial desecration of the previous century, it would be stupid to make the same mistakes with modern understanding. Industry must develop new building materials for toads, commercial and residential buildings etc. A river is no place for this kind of destructive Projects! It should be an automatic NO, if we had any protection for lakes and rivers left.

Cinci Csere

Stop risking important estuaries for these projects! The science does not allow projects like this to be successful.

  • Noise reverberating off the mountains surrounding the site and the ocean. This area is valued for its peace and quiet.
  • Decline in property values and natural capital values. Howe Sound watersheds provide an estimated annual value of $800 million to $4.7 billion in ecosystem services.
  • No benefit to the local community, only loss of quality of life from noise and industrial activity.
  • Effects on marine life, wildlife, fish and recovering Howe Sound.
  • Effect on the biodiversity and ecological value of the estuary.
  • Rezoning from current rural RU-2 to industrial use.
  • Rezoning increases industrial land use in Howe Sound not protection.
  • Indirect and direct job losses due to negative effects of the mine on other economies in the area for only 12 permanent jobs created.
  • Cumulative impacts on wildlife from the new Run of the River power project and ongoing logging in the McNab Valley.
  • Future expansion of the mine beyond 16 years and its current size.

STOP WASTING TAXPAYERS MONEY!

Personal Information Withheld - Sechelt, British Columbia

The environment comes first. Nature must be preserved not destroyed. The estuary, and salmon runs are a top priority. The land and waters are just starting to come back to their natural state for sea and wildlife.

Concerned Resident - Squamish, British Columbia

As past Director of the Vancouver Aquarium put it "If Howe Sound were in any other part of the world, it would be a great national park"

We need to protect our lands, our waters and our resources, selling off our land, water & resources for profit is not saving our world for our children.

The mine will have an impact on the economic potential of the Howe Sound area. There is considerable potential in Howe Sound to continue to grow the tourism industry with significant economic multipliers that would accrue to the local economy. A mine is not going to add to the beauty of the area.

The proposed mine developer, Burnco, filed a judicial review application against DFO in BC Supreme Court to 'strong arm' the DFO to allow them to proceed to an environmental review. The DFO have since agreed to that review with serious concerns as "the project presents a high risk to Salmon and Salmon habitat".

In addition to the destruction to fish habitat, Burnco's own consultants believe the mine site could be home to 21 species at risk including a population of Roosevelt Elk re-introduced to McNab Creek in 2001 by the BC Ministry of the Environment.

The size of the gravel pit will limit access to the foreshore for wildlife such as elk, deer and bears who currently frequent the area to forage for food.

The excavation of the river estuary will dramatically change the movement of water through the valley and have a significant negative impact on the freshwater habitat.

The noise from the gravel crushing facility and loading of barges will be significant. It will have a negative impact on the enjoyment of the area by boaters, kayakers, fishermen, tourists and other in Howe Sound. The mine developer has stated at meetings that if the demand is there, they want to run the mining and crushing facilities 24/7, 365 days a year.

Noise and light pollution will have significant negative impacts on the land and aquatic animals in the area. Noise and vibration pollution have been found to negatively impact the ability of marine mammals to communicate, navigate, find food and it is believed increasingly to impact their fertility.

How can we consider developing a massive 77 hectare pit which will excavate the entire McNab estuary from one side of the valley to the other, completely eliminating one of only three river estuaries in Howe Sound, without developing an integrated, long term land and water use plan for the whole of Howe Sound?

Howe Sound is only now showing encouraging signs of environmental recovery after decades of industrial misuse. Should we now allow a reindustrialization of the area?

Why would anyone develop a gravel mine in Vancouver's ocean playground, an area of outstanding natural beauty? This is where an ever growing city comes to sail, dive, kayak, fish, camp and hike. Tourists flock from all over the world to see "SuperNatural, British Columbia", how would a gravel pit look in the tourism advertising?

Clark Leighs - Gibsons, British Columbia

Simply, this is like the stick that breaks the camels back. It's just one more 'development'[stick]. But it will prove to be a messy development at the cost of Howe Sound's recovery from years of pollution, chemical, noise, debris from operations. Noise carries a great distance and a few trees will not stop that sound travel. Granted Port Mellon is nearby but do we need to keep saying that since one is there another is OK. I think this development will prove to be short sighted and destructive. Stop it.

Personal Information Withheld - Roberts Creek, British Columbia

he fact that there is even an option for a company to mine anything in the sensative over used eco system of Howe sound is completely ignorant .I am against this mine proposal and any caring rational person would be .

Personal Information Withheld - Roberts Creek, British Columbia

The fact that there is even an option for a company to mine anything in the sensative over used eco system of Howe sound is completely ignorant .I am against this mine proposal and any caring rational person would be .

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

I think it is stupid to put this mine in Howe Sound.

This whole area should be protected for the enjoyment of the huge population of Vancouver just around the corner from Horseshoe Bay.

I do not like people making these sort of decisions who have no attachment to this or any other area.

Alexander Briggs

I am opposed to the development of this gravel mine in the McNab creek estuary. This environment should be preserved as it is sensitive and fragile wildlife habitat.

Harold Stirland - Courtenay, British Columbia

The McNab Creek flats are a most unique and valuable component of the natural environment of Howe Sound, now under threat from industry. I visited this area several times, and have seen for myself that a place of such rare qualities must not be destroyed for profit or jobs. Please recognize that the public interest should rule, in this case.

Ray and Elspeth Bradbury - West Vancouver, British Columbia

We are absolutely opposed to the proposed Burnco Aggregate Mine Project on Howe Sound, BC.

We are disgusted with the broken environmental assessment process which automatically grants approval without proper consultation with residents or with First Nations.

As residents of the Howe Sound area this catastrophic mine proposal would impact us directly, both as an environmental stupidity of a disaster and in the increased heavy traffic out of the sound.

Howe Sound, which people and governments have worked hard to clean up after the Britannia Mine mess, should be declared a national Park and a UNESCO biosphere treasure.

The Sound is no place for LNG plants or heavy extraction and pollution such as the Burnco outrage.

Personal Information Withheld - Nanoose Bay, British Columbia

Stop this
Insane Popen out mine
Utterly silly

Personal Information Withheld - Furry Creek, British Columbia

Noise pollution, estuary destruction, wildlife destruction, marine life destruction, natural beautiful area destruction. What more need one say? Is there not some other place along the thousands of miles of coastline or islands where such an operation could be better placed???? Howe Sound needs to continue mending from its prior mishandling by man. This project will do nothing to mend the Sound but on the contrary will exacerbate damage to the fragile eco system.

Personal Information Withheld - Gambier Island, British Columbia

Howe sound is NO place for a massive gravel pit! I have property on Gambier island and I strongly oppose this project. What an awful place to put an open pit, home to so many important species. The environmental assessment process is clearly a sham!!!

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Imagine finally having the waters of Howe Sound being clean enough to to sustain the Orcas, salmon, dolphins, crab, seals, after years of struggling to sustain these vital creatures of our precious West Coast. It's time we stop putting into jeopardy, our surrounding waters and environment. There is no need to keep threatening our most valuable resources with these short sighted projects. It's time to think more responsibly!!

Sarah Valentine - Pemberton, British Columbia

I am concerned that for only 12 mere jobs, the risk to our environment of the Howe Sound, let alone the livelihood of the neighbouring communities, such as the loss of quality of life from the noise reverberating off the mountains surrounding the site and the ocean and from the industrial activity and the decline in property values and natural capital values, outweigh the job potential.

Also, the Howe Sound watersheds provide an estimated annual value of $800 million to $4.7 billion in ecosystem services.The effects on marine life, wildlife, fish and recovering Howe Sound cannot be accurately predetermined.

Also of concern is the rezoning from current rural RU-2 to industrial use. Rezoning increases industrial land use in Howe Sound not protection, and can adversely affect the biodiversity and ecological value of the estuary. The cumulative impacts on wildlife from the new Run of the River power project and ongoing logging in the McNab Valley just exponentially affects the Howe.

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

It is increasingly rare to find unspoiled nature in close proximity to a major urban centre. There is massive value in such an amenity. I ask that government not underestimate this value which is recognized by both current and future generations. Howe Sound is, in part, such an amenity. Increasing commercial and industrial land uses in the Sound will in most cases be very poor public policy. In the inevitable exercise of balancing competing interests, be mindful of what a rare treasure Howe Sound is.

Thank you.

Danny Shanks - Keats Island, British Columbia

Keep Howe Sound as natural as possible.

Where in the world is there a better place to be left alone.

Past industry has done great harm to Howe sound. Orca's and Humpback whales Are finally returning after years without them. The sound is recovering It's not the time to take s step backwards.

Tom Franklin - Squamish, British Columbia

As frequent boater to the area I am appalled at this proposal. The only truly sandy beach on Howe Sound and so lose to Vancouver. Huge fish and wildlife values. Should be a law against this

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

We, as a society, are finally coming to grips with the damage we are inflicting on our natural environment under the guise of creating so called economic benefits for the greater good of the masses. This is a worldwide problem often initiated by investors and championed by politicians who at times allow self interest to conflict with making the right decisions.

The proposed Burnco Aggregate Mine Project appears to generate little or no social or financial benefits for British Columbians. However, it remains a threat to the ecology and to our current and future quiet enjoyment of one of the most beautiful stretches of coast line in our Province.

A review of the present submissions should make it self evident there are many concerned individuals who do not back this project and unless there are extremely valid reasons to the contrary, most responsible governments would respond to this sort of public discourse in a positive and supportive manner.

Please refuse to approve Burnco's application and let this part of Howe Sound be conserved for all to enjoy now and for generations to follow.

Personal Information Withheld - Gibsons, British Columbia

Just say no.

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

To whom it may concern,

I highly oppose the Bunco Aggregate Mine project. I spend a lot of time exploring Howe Sound on the water with my young kids. It is home to some incredible wildlife that is again thriving. This mine would be a disaster to natural salmon habitats. Let's promote tourism in this area instead of heavy industry. Thanks, Jeneen

Tyler Smith - North Vancouver, British Columbia

BAD BAD idea in beatiful location have been going there for FORTY years do not wreck it now

Mark Evans - Gibsons, British Columbia

It is understandable to extract raw resources, especially when they are easily transported to a large centre. However, this area has recently recovered from extensive logging and is now to be the focus of soil extraction. There are many areas on the coast where soil extraction and logging activities have left equipment and dilapidated infrastructure rusting on the shore.6 Remediation of these areas is now the tax payers responsibility. If soil extraction is allowed to proceed bonds must be posted to ensure that should the company face insolvency reclamation can be completed.

Benefits to the community have been cited to be 12 jobs.These may or may not go to members of the neighbouing communities. There must be more tangible benefits to the nearby communities, such as a road to link Woodfibre to Port Mellon. This would also benefit the area by providing emergency access. Now is the time to ensure that projects such as this benefit all Canadians, not just the investors and employees of Burnco.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

Stop destroying our natural habitats,are their not enough gravel pits already!!

Don Barthel - Vancouver, British Columbia

Salmon are under pressure from many projects in this province. This project in particular threatens salmon spawning grounds. Please deny the applicants application and cancel the project.

Pascal - Squamish, British Columbia

Will increased shipping traffic affect sea and howe sound sea life, fauna and flora?

Burnco says it will be an awesome project, have a lake, etc etc. I dont see the point of having another lake, we are in Canada!!!! Nature is best without human interaction. I think this kind of industrial project should be far from human habitat. This definitively isnt the right place to have Burnco ruining everything. Howe Sound is beautiful I hope the Government will assess right. There are more important things than money and profit.

Peter Hill - Vancouver, British Columbia

Hi,

I have been visiting Anvil Island for the lat 60 years.

Only in the last five years have I seen Howe Sound bounce back with whales, dolphins, salmon and herring. Please don't upset this beautiful delicate ecology with a gravel pit that will damage salmon estuary.

Dennise Dombroski - Gibsons, British Columbia

This project seems to exist solely for the benefit of Burnco. There is no apparent benefit to the neighbouing towns, and no long term benefit to the citizens of BC. 12 jobs, which may or may not be filled by local residents is not enough to justify the inevitable loss of tourism opportunities of this ecological gem, not to mention the destruction of the recently rejuvenated wlidlfe mecca. There must be more thought put into the long term benefits. I am tired of seeing BC's resources being squandered for short term minimal gain.

Mike - Muskoka, Ontario

Before I moved back to Ontario I spent many years on the west coast and have visited Howe Sound many times. I think it is a travesty that there is even a chance that an area filled with such serene beauty is being threatened by a big corporation like Burnco. With so many potential negative environmental impacts and little - if any - positive impacts for the community of Howe Sound it is a wonder that this project is even being considered.

Sheila Kinnear - Gibsons, British Columbia

I've frequented Thunderbird Yacht Club's outstation at Ekins Point since 1981 and have spent many hours contemplating the beauty of the valley across the way.

A consultant hired by Burnco tried to assure me that I would not be able to hear anything from Burnco's operation.

Patrick Walsh - Aurora, Ontario

If you've ever been to beautiful Howe Sound, you'll know how ecologically, geographically and culturally significant it is. The risks to the environment alone are not worth the benefits of this project, and the blight it will make on the landscape is decidedly not conducive to beautiful B.C. How this even got this far is mind-boggling. Please stop it.

Jessica Nelson - Whistler, British Columbia

I am not supportive of the Burnco Mine project and am concerned regarding the risks to the McNab Creek Estuary. Please do NOT approve this project.

September 29, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

This project is quite disturbing and totally unnecessary. As a resident of Howe Sound I do not want my grandchildren, and the rest of our family to have our lives put at risk with the dangerous pollutants that this proposed gravel pit will emit.

Why Here in Beautiful Howe Sound would you try to destroy our environment .Find somewhere in Alberta to obtain gravel and leave our land and water alone. We do not need you here. We have enough suppliers of gravel to meet B.Cs need for years to come, and you will be taking Jobs away from our Local Work Force..

Personal Information Withheld - Burnaby, British Columbia

I have many concerns about the Burnco project coming to McNab Creek and the effect it will have on the wild life and land around the gravel pit. Currently there are eagles, bears, wolves, cougars, deer and the list goes on in that area. Last weekend I spotted a bear right where the barge would come in and out of, but yet you still are proposing to use this area and state animals will not be effected or what about the whales that swam by a few weeks ago. This is also a very public place and one of the few left in the Howe Sound, not to mention BC, where boats can pull up and anchor and swim or kayak, this project will destroy this by polluting the water and becoming a unsafe area for all and hazardous. On another note, all the cabins or docks in the area will be effected by the actual gravel itself in the air which can create health problems or worsen some health issues if inhaled, please go somewhere else, where you will not be ruining a great area to only crea te a couple of jobs. If you are commenting and have not been to the Howe Sound, go take a look and you will see how bad of an idea this is. We need to be considerate of the environment and wild life beautiful BC has to offer especially at McNab Creek.

Lois Neu - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Please do not allow the Bunco Aggregate Project to go forward! I am a keen outdoors person and recreational user of this area. I cannot imagine trying to paddle board or kayak in the Douglas Bay or across the water, while dodging barges and listening to the hammer hammer hammer of rock crushing up the valley. Human progress can be measured in many ways, one of which should be preserving Howe Sound for its public recreational usage and beauty. Please prioritize land and wilderness preservation in our province and in particular in Howe Sound! Thank you.

Ruth Simons - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Visual Impacts

The visual impacts overlook the views from the property owners directly across from the mine at higher elevations. The consultant said they did not consider the views from these homes due to the property being private which limited their access. It would be in the interest of these property owners to allow access to the consultants in order to know what the visual impact would be. The attached photo was taken from one of the lots and it appears they would see the operations area. More studies should be done as changing this view could have significant impact on property values.

Another comment I heard about the visuals – the lights at the project site and barge loading were being compared to the lights at Howe Sound Pulp and Paper. The residents at McNab do not see Howe Sound Pulp and Paper but the story boards implied they do. For the McNab Strata residents, this project impacts their current night time views.

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Spider Robinson - Bowen Island, British Columbia

I strongly oppose Burnco's proposed destruction of the McNab Estuary and its conversion from an environmental treasure to an active mining operation, in a rural residential region. I have lived near active mines, and I would not wish that on you or on anyone in government, unless Tronald Dump wins. Please return the favor. Don't sell us out to profiteers for dollars. We remember things like that a LONG time.

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

This project is completely inappropriate for the Howe Sound area; and the company's rationale that the environmental impact is justified by the historical precedent of previous mining operations in the area is deeply unsatisfactory.

September 28, 2016

Michael Maser - Gibsons, British Columbia

12 jobs in return for this project?? That is a totally unacceptable proposition -- this project will not only desecrate a recovering marine and terrestrial environment, but the noise pollution will be severe and carry for many kilometres. To confirm this, just visit the town of Egmont, across the water from the Lafarge quarry. The noise is excessive and totally unescapable - just as it the Burnco project will be. If you want to drive away tourism and make the north region of Howe Sound unliveable this is the project to do it. I live in nearby Gibsons and totally object to this project being approved.

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

I concur with all the overwhelming opposition to this project noted on this EA comment page. Certainly, this project cannot continue given all of the opposition and problematic concerns listed here.

September 27, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Coquitlam, British Columbia

We are two Lower Mainland based sea kayakers who have visited this area many times, including working on the recently created Sea to Sky Marine Trail. This (and just about any further) industrial development in Howe Sd is unwelcome, as the area starts to recover from a devastating century of heavy resource exploitation that showed only disrespect for this wonderful fiord.

However, we can see that the company has gone to some lengths to minimize negative impacts. Their environmental consultants provided good information at the recent open house. Daytime noise seems to be the chief concern while the pit is operating. Further acoustic measures should be explored for the barge loading process.

Rehabilitation of the landscape post exhaustion of the pit must include measures to prevent any possible breach of the creek into the artificial lake or pond. All pilings, equipment and buildings must be removed sensitively. We strongly believe and urge that the developer be required to leave a positive local legacy by creating a marine-access-only campsite for very small boats above the fine beach behind the former loader location. This would complement other existing sites in Howe Sd which are already getting significant use in this growing recreation area. 16 or 20 years from now, no doubt all other nearby sites will be at maximum usage capacity. No dock would be required or wanted, but toilets would be very desirable. Presumably the pit will have earlier built sanitary facilities for its workers and possibly these could be adapted and permitted to remain for a further lifespan, if still working well. The site has shelter, more than adequate fresh water an d the tree screen would mean little or no visual evidence of a campsite would be detectable from afar.

The final concern is that transport be permitted only by barge and tug of the stated dimensions. Other aggregate developers elsewhere have suggested deep sea freighters to export valuable aggregate far afield. This would change the application entirely and would not be acceptable here.

Frank Mogridge - North Vancouver, British Columbia

I am a pleasure boater using this area and am very concerned with the environmental impacts of a project of this magnitude. It is hard to believe approval may be given for Burncos proposal I attended a information session where Burncos representatives/scientists were defending their take on impacts of this project and providing limited mitigation to some of the publics concerns.

The noise study in my opinion did not take into account and represent the activites and noise that this will generate in the area. What limitations will be placed on them, if approved for hours of operation??

For what appears to be jobs for 12 people versus the impact to the environment in this area for generations to come where is the value for the public of such approvals being granted ...this is hard to comprehend.

There will be visual impacts to this presently beautiful area the scar left on the mountside and the environmentally dead water lake left behind will be a lasting clear message of the mistake made if these approvals are granted.

September 26, 2016

Dean Johnston - Gambier, British Columbia

Don't destroy the beauty of this place. It is a draw for tourists and locals alike. Howe Sound is finally recovering. We see whales, porpoises, sea lions and eagles frequently. My children deserve to enjoy this beautiful part of Howe Sound too!

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Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

I am opposed to the Burnco development in Howe Sound. See my concers and questions in the attached document.

Personal Information Withheld - West Vancouver, British Columbia

A mine does not belong in a pristine Estuary.

Personal Information Withheld - West Vancouver, British Columbia

This project does not belong in Howe Sound. It will damage the estuary, marine life, the pristine nature of the Sound, and tourism will suffer.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

I am opposed to the Burnco Gravel Pit at McNab Creek. When I can see the flock of cranes fly in,circle around and land on the beach to wait patiently for a fish to swim by. When I can watch eagles fly by ,almost at eye level, and watch them hunt. When I can watch a bear enter the estuary and munch on the grass there. When I can see a herd of Elk venture out on to the estuary and then wade around in the water. It is all awesome! When the gravel pit comes in this will all change.Change,not for the better. I think about the sea life that will endure the disruptions of there home. I think about the animals that forge for food on the sand beach not understanding the noise and vibrations they feel. I think about the animals in the nearby forest who dont understand what has happened to their homes. A gravel pit this close to an estuary is definately not a good idea.The lake that Burnco will leave when the mining process is over.What chemicals will lurk in the bottom o f the lake. A lake wasnt there before they came and it shouldnt be there when they leave.

Howe Sound is a beautiful area.

Please dont allow Burnco to mine there. I'm sure gravel can be found elsewhere

Stephen Zimmerman - McNab Creek, British Columbia

It is a undisputed fact the Howe Sound now has more wildlife in its waters and valleys then it has had in 20 years, as a result of the large rehabilitation projects from the federal and Provencal governments. projects such as Britannia creek rehabilitation and environmental Port Mellon Mill upgrades and projects, has had untold benefits for wildlife. Herring are back , which brought porpoise, and Orca's are inhabiting the Howe sound again. This is new and is seen by all ages, it can't be missed by Department of Fisheries. Years earlier a similar gravel mine project was turned down by Department of Fisheries and oceans and the only thing that has changed since that project being denied is more wildlife numbers as a result from government rehabilitation projects.

So with all the taxpayer rehabilitation projects over the years in the Howe sound and with all the benefits, is it viable to approve a project as environmentally disruptive as this?

Will the added tax revenue benefit from Burnco cover the compromised rehabilitation projects from decades past?

Stephen Zimmerman- 22 year taxpayer to McNab Creek

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

I STRONGLY OPPOSE!

Burnco claims to keep environment and scenery untouched, but when you remove non-renewable resources the list of negative effects goes on to permanently destroy the land, water, ocean, wildlife, air quality and the thousands of people that come here to enjoy the natural beauty of British Columbia. Especially Howe sound.

To all those people who support industry, your only supporting 12 jobs. 12! For only 20 years! Need aggregates for construction? Use the local company in Squamish! Coast aggregates! Burnco already has 3 locations in bc and many more in Alberta and Saskatchewan. This place is too beautiful to ruin it with a mine. There are only so many untouched places to enjoy with your family and friends. Where do you plan on building your dream cabin?! Or taking sunset rides on the boat with your husband? There are A MILLION other places to extract gravel. Don't make mcnab creek one of them. Industry is not everything and with Squamish finally on the map, let's keep this place beautiful and pristine. We paid our environmental price in industry with britannia beach, nexen, logging. Now it's time for tourism and Eco tourism. BURNCO GTFO

Personal Information Withheld - Gambier Island, British Colmbia

As a property owner in Howe Sound I am opposed to the Burnco mining project. McNab Creek Estuary provides nutrient rich stream waters that fertilize the ocean and create rich and productive ecologies. It is a delicate ecosystem still recovering from past logging. Approval of the Burnco proposal will return the area to an industrial zone.

Despite Burnco's proposed mitigation measures, damage to this recovering ecosystem will be unavoidable.

Environmental Concerns:

  • Damage to salmon, herring and other marine life
  • Noise from gravel crushing affecting wild life
  • Disruption to the elk, an at risk species
  • Lighting during construction and operation causing further disruption to life in the area
  • Compromised air quality due to emissions
  • Increased barge traffic in Howe Sound
  • Overall damage to the estuary and surrounding area that comes with industrial development

Howe Sound has been returning to its natural beauty, creating tourism, recreational opportunities and vibrant communities. We have seen the return of dolphins and whales, indicators of ecological recovery. The Burnco Aggregate Project does not fit our values. Please say no to this project and preserve the delicate ecosystem of Howe Sound and its diverse local economies.

Howe Sound is one of the most beautiful fjords in the world and a BC landmark on the Sea to Sky corridor. Howe Sound is the home to a great variety of mammals, fish, frogs, rare birds and invertebrates. It supports jobs in the local economy, especially tourism which has a significant ripple effect through the region's economy, and brings pleasure to thousands of locals and tourists every year.

We all cherish and celebrate the recovery of Howe Sound after decades of toxic pollution from heavy industry. BC taxpayers paid millions to clean up the Britannia mine in Howe Sound and now finally those actions, along with other conservation efforts, are paying off with the return of fish stocks, dolphins, orcas, whales and a proliferation of bald eagles and other wildlife.

Please bring to an end the proposed Burnco open pit mine before massive economic harm is caused to thousands of local residents and businesses including our film and tourism industries as well as countless dollars have been spent by both BC and Federal regulators evaluating whether the environmental destruction of a portion of this sensitive ecosystem can be "mitigated". We support the creation of a long term comprehensive land and water use plan for economic and social activities in the region that are compatible with sustainable uses of the Howe Sound.

We ask you to stop this ill-advised project that will destroy a portion of this amazing natural resource, all for the sake of the short term profits of a mining company.

Personal Information Withheld - Horseshoe Bay, British Columbia

I fail to understand the merits of trading a project of high risk to our fragile ecosystem in exchange for 12 low-skill jobs. It just doesn't make sense.

I strongly oppose this proposal for the harm it will do to our environment, community and economy. The Burnco project will irreversibly harm important wildlife, riparian and ocean habitat.

Howe Sound is only recently recovering from decades of environmental degradation from the mining industry. British Columbians are celebrating the tentative return of spawning herring and salmon along with crabs, prawns, dolphins and whales.

Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) has repeatedly opposed the project as it is so critical to the ecosystems. Please respect the findings of our Ministry scientists by rejecting this project.

Since Burnco itself acknowledges that this project will destroy the estuary and damage the Howe Sound ecosystem, why proceed? For such little return?

The 12 low-skill jobs promised by Burnco will come at the cost of more sustainable industries including fisheries, recreation, film and tourism from which dollars are currently flowing into Howe Sound communities.

Burnco is a bad deal for Howe Sound, a bad deal for the surrounding communities, and a bad deal for British Columbia.

Richard H. O'Neill - Roberts Creek, British Columbia

Howe Sound is just beginning to recover from the disastrous effects of previous industrial development. As a part of the Salish Sea the entire Howe Sound area should be allowed to return to its former natural state and become habitat for many species of fish and marine mammals. It will have far greater value as a clean natural habitat area than it will ever have from short term industrial projects.

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

I am NOT in favour of Burnco's proposed gravel mine at McNab Creek where fragile ecosystems will be destroyed. The recovery of Howe Sound is at stake, and the environment should not be sold to profit a few shareholders. For generations to come, we need to protect this area. No project approval!!! We can't undestroy the area when Burnco goes broke or walks away after the damage is done...

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

I am NOT in favour of Burnco's proposed gravel mine at McNab Creek where fragile ecosystems will be destroyed. The recovery of Howe Sound is at stake, and the environment should not be sold to profit a few shareholders. For generations to come, we need to protect this area. No project approval!!! We can't undestroy the area when Burnco goes broke or walks away after the damage is done...

Personal Information Withheld - Gambier Island, British Columbia

As a property owner in Howe Sound I am opposed to the Burnco mining project. McNab Creek Estuary provides nutrient rich stream waters that fertilize the ocean and create rich and productive ecologies. It is a delicate ecosystem still recovering from past logging. Approval of the Burnco proposal will return the area to an industrial zone.

Despite Burnco's proposed mitigation measures, damage to this recovering ecosystem will be unavoidable.

Environmental Concerns:

  • Damage to salmon, herring and other marine life
  • Noise from gravel crushing affecting wild life
  • Disruption to the elk, an at risk species
  • Lighting during construction and operation causing further disruption to life in the area
  • Compromised air quality due to emissions
  • Increased barge traffic in Howe Sound
  • Overall damage to the estuary and surrounding area that comes with industrial development

Howe Sound has been returning to its natural beauty, creating tourism, recreational opportunities and vibrant communities. We have seen the return of dolphins and whales, indicators of ecological recovery. The Burnco Aggregate Project does not fit our values. Please say no to this project and preserve the delicate ecosystem of Howe Sound and its diverse local economies. M

Mr. Lovett - Surrey, British Columbia

Sirs,

The Burnco project is a bad idea. It is unnecessary for BC and is a very bad fit in the area that they've proposed. Please deny this application.

Robert Worcester - Vancouver, British Columbia

This must not happen! This area should be slated for a national park. It is one of the beautiful areas of BC and the world.

September 25, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Comments on studies regarding Socio-economic and land-use.

It was determined the Local Study Area would extend out into Thornborough Channel 1.5 kms. The Local Study Area for noise should include the residents and outstations directly across from the project area on Gambier Island particularly since these affected stakeholders have been very vocal about this project from the onset. Sound travels much farther across the water, particularly when noise is reverberating off the mountains. Because this area is so quiet, many can testify that voices can be heard from people on boats near McNab by people on Gambier across the water.

In the section on Non-Traditional Land Use it appears some of the problem with the assessment is the data sourced from the Province of B.C. on Recreational Features Inventory figure 7.3-8 is misleading and not representative of the high sensitivity by recreational users. The homes on the north side of Gambier directly across from this project, the yacht club outstations and waters inbetween "unspecified". This data is certainly not accurate however, if the proponent and consultants had read the comments during the draft application, this discrepancy would be corrected. The other omission from this map is any designation of the recreation value of the waters of Howe Sound.

The noise rating of 53 decibels that will be heard by the property owners at McNab Strata and close to McNab Creek is unacceptable. If buildings require walls with sound ratings for this decibel level so neighbors cannot hear the noise, then BURNCO should be required to construct walls to prevent this noise.

The socio-economic studies omit key social values of Howe Sound, especially for youth. Interviews with "Key informants" omitted interviews with any of the camp operators who have brought at least 3,000 youth to this area every year for decades. No interviews were conducted with the Boys and Girls Club of South coast BC.

Same can be said for realtors in the area, specifically Rick Gustafson who has specialized in sales on Gambier Island for many years.

Tourism data is minimal:

Over the past few years Howe Sound has seen the regular return of Ocras and Grey Whales to this area and Orcas have been captured on film in front of McNab Creek. This has attracted new tour operators, including Prince of Whales Whale watching tours. Cruise ships travel past McNab Creek enroute north. Measures of Tourism should not be based on commercial operations only as this would imply that Gambier Island does not have "tourism". Recreation property owners on Gambier Island bring visitors to the island and there are many trail runners, hiking groups, school and educational groups that travel to Gambier by water taxi, the scheduled Stormaway water taxi or come by private boat or kayak. Hikes to Gambier Lake and Mount Artaban are accessed via the Halkett Bay Provincial Marine Park. None of this has been captured in this context statement the project location.

The assessment states phone-based interviews were conducted with "key informants" but the list of references indicates few personal phone calls and does not list who was interviewed. Owners of the Douglas Bay Development were no contacted by phone or email to understand why they have strong opposition to this project due to their proximity across the water. There was no interview with Howe Sound Pulp and Paper, referenced as the oldest pulp and paper mill on the coast and oldest industry in Howe Sound. This mill is not far from the project area and there is significant history between this company, DFO and the artificial spawning channel BURNCO is proposing to remove. The attached contract between HSLP and DFO explains that relationship. In order to understand the context of this land use, reference to this history of this spawning channel provide more context to the Resource Use.

Lions Gate Consulting published a Socio-Economic baseline of Howe Sound in May 2016. Golder refers to the Lions Bay Consulting report for Howe Sound produced in 2013. This report covered only a portion of Howe Sound in 2013 so is not representative of the entire region. Since this assessment is for a project that in the future, what updates to the assumptions in this EA are relevant in the new report that studies the whole of Howe Sound and the RSA?

I strongly disagree with the conclusion in the environmental assessment: "The residual adverse effects are considered to be not-significant however as there are established forest industry activities in the area, recreational and tourism activities are not expected to be displaced from the LSA and the effect is expected to be limited to the medium-term (i.e., the life of the Project). " The current ongoing forestry activities are not a rationalization for a 16 year mining operation that brings constant significant noise and permanently removes the forest which is renewable. The residual effects of this project will have significant social and economic impacts on the current users of the area and be a deterrent for future recreational and tourism potential in the area.

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Beverley Grantham

The unbearable noise created by an aggregate mining, crushing and loading operation running 24/7 will drive away marine mammals that currently frequent Howe Sound. It is a well documented scientific fact that removing apex predators from an eco system results in dangerous imbalances that can cause extinctions of other species.

Say NO to Burnco!

Betty Morton - Bowen Island, British Columbia

I strongly oppose the Bunco McNab Creek proposal for the harm it will do to our environment, community and economy.

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Health Impacts

I was asked at the public information session in West Vancouver by BURNCO's Project Manager why I care how and when the BURNCO mine operates when I can't hear or see it. I have frequented Thornborough Channel over the past many years with friends and family. We and many others refer to the area as the Aloha Channel. Due to the topography it is one of our favorite areas in Howe Sound for enjoying the warm sun and water for swimming. We visit year round as it is close to home and instantly relaxing. My daughters and their friends care very much for this area. A trip to Aloha Channel is always a birthday wish.

When people go to quiet places close to nature they derive valuable health benefits. These health benefits are not considered a "value component" in this EA process and should be. There are numerous studies on the benefits of natural sounds on mood behavior. By a simple search on-line it is possible to find studies conducted out of universities that support the fact natural scenes and natural sounds can be beneficial to health by reducing stress. Thousands of people testify they visit this part of Howe Sound for the peace and to be close to nature. Howe Sound, one of Canada's southernmost fjords, is close to large urban centre and within one hour from busy Vancouver people can be in this peaceful part of Howe Sound. The rationalization Golder Consultants make about logging activity being a baseline that then justifies the noise of gravel extraction, crushing and barge loading is like comparing apples to berries. The noise from this gravel operation is b eing introduced to what is now a peaceful area as logging activity is intermittent. The consultant evaluating noise impacts has never been to the project area. He seemed to not take into account the geography of the mountains on either side of this project and how sound reverberates off these mountains. Those who live in Howe Sound can easily testify how far sounds travel across the water. To benchmark the acceptable noise levels against Health Canada's acceptable health standards is not relevant to what is acceptable in a peaceful area and the impact on mental health. Ambient sounds of nature cannot be compared to the sounds of artificial industrial noise. As Metro Vancouver continues to grow, protecting these quiet places close to the urban area is of great intrinsic value, far greater than short term revenues and twelve direct permanent jobs.

Personal Information Withheld - West Vancouver, British Columbia

Section 2.2 of the Burnco EA application fails to convince me that the lower mainland cannot meet the growing need for gravel. I cannot find any evidence that existing supplies in the lower mainland will diminish in the future or that no new sources will be found in other areas. Burnco also appears to justify the McNab Creek site by informing us that THEIR shipping costs will be reduced (for gravel transport that they already ship from Port MacNeil, Jervis Inlet, and Sechelt). That the proponent wishes to reduce their costs does not adequately overcome the future and certain losses to be placed on the local community/recreational users: property values, recreational opportunities (both personal and business). The environmental loss is not justified. How does one measure the pride that our community derives from Howe Sound? This project offers no benefit or advantage to Howe Sound and significantly reduces the immediate and long-term quality of life in t he area. This project is devoted to the singular profit of the proponent and no one else. McNab Creek is the worst choice for resuming industry in Howe Sound.

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Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

During the September 14th public information session, Dr. Jeff Marliave of the Vancouver Aquarium brought to the Marine Resources consultant's attention the latest data regarding cloud sponge reefs and other information relevant to the project. Dr. Marliave and the Howe Sound research group have been studying Howe Sound over the past 30 years. It was not evident the Golder Consultants had the requested the latest information from the Vancouver Aquarium. Dr. Marliave said he would send the data to the consultant but will that information be reflected in the assessment? There were concerns about the alternative shipping route and its proximity to important cloud sponge reefs en route.

Ruth Simons - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Flood hazards in the McNab Valley

At the public information session I heard an explanation of how stream water would be held back from overflowing into the pit by the preventative berms. I live in Howe Sound and there have been many extreme rain and wind events in the past where erosion has caused landslides and debris flooding. There is an aerial video of the McNab Creek and project area from 1997 that shows a landslide on the bank of McNab Creek at the top east side of the project area. The landslide brought many large trees into the creek and there is evidence they were carried downstream as seen in the video. It seems logical to me that all development in the Howe Sound watershed should be using similar predictions for extreme rainfall due to climate change. Page 5-4-28/29 is confusing to me as it seems that because Golder has no evidence of significant debris flows and floods and conclude no further investigation is needed. It also says further investigation should be done to ens ure engineering is adequate. Would the bank erosion evident in the 1997 video not be considered significant and how is it determined this could not happen again given the ongoing logging in the area? How can this environmental assessment determine any significant environment harm without these studies being complete? When I asked the Geotech consultant if the most up to date flood predictions were used in the design of the preventative berms, he referred me to the Surface Water consultant. I asked the consultant who had "Climate Change" on her badge and she could not answer the question. The Surface Water consultant suggested I submit my comments recommending the most up to date flood predictions based on climate change be used. Is the science for extreme flood event predictions the same being used for this project as it would be for other new projects in the Howe Sound watershed?

Personal Information Withheld - West Vancouver, British Columbia

In Table 7.3-9 of the Burcno Aggregate Application: both for the construction and operations phase, Burnco indicates that existing logging boom tenure traffic will be similar to water taxis and barges and tug traffic that will bring both personal and equipment to the site. This is inaccurate to suggest that recreational traffic are somehow 'educated and experienced' due to having had prior experience with log boom-related (typically very slow) water transportation. Is it not expected that water taxis will be tasked with transporting employees/workers in as efficient manner as possible? in the least amount of time? If so, local recreational boaters can expect high-speed water taxis and high-speed tugs with the ensuing high wakes to affect recreational traffic through this area. Children's camp canoes, all kayakers, all wake-boarders and paddle-boarders, small fishing dingys and swimmers should expect to be swamped by these commercial vessels. It is u nrealistic and unsafe that BURNCO expects that these groups will have had experience with commercial water traffic and be aware of the federal DOT COLLISION REGULATIONS. There can be no 'mitigation' of the risk for safety in this widely-used area during the summer months. Burnco's Marine Transportation Plan does not adequately address that these users will not have VHF radios nor be reading Notices to Mariners.

Personal Information Withheld - Brackendale, British Columbia

After attending one of the information sessions on the proposed Burnco Aggregate Mine Project and mulling over the abundant information presented I think that it is a fairly easy conclusion to make that in no way would we welcome this project to the jewel that we call Howe Sound.

One area that came to light in the presentation is that there will be minimal environmental impact because the land has been used in the past for logging. Really! This is such backwards thinking for 2016 and the future that we want for Howe Sound. We have seen first hand with the clean-up of the Britannia Copper Mine that we can reverse the environmental damage that we once created.

The Howe Sound Marine Trail is proof that we can create a different future and story for our beloved Howe Sound. Economically we do need jobs in the SLRD region but are we willing to trade such a beautiful area for 12 jobs?

Personal Information Withheld - West Vancouver, British Columbia

1. The construction phase: This application and the public presentation did not offer an adequate understanding of the duration of the construction phase, nor the maintenance phase. The construction phase is estimated to be from 4 months to 2 years and as the project is expanded will there be more than the initial construction phase? I found that the proponent does not appear to adequately reconcile noise, vessel wake assessment during the construction phase with peak recreational periods such as May to October. The maintenance period is indicated as 16 years. AT the end of this period, does the BCEAO have any mechanism to force the proponent to complete this project? does this mechanism have any teeth?

2. BURNCO's public presentation indicated that > 100 jobs would be required during the construction phase: this number of personnel would require > 2 water taxi trips (return) per day and their associated wakes. The foreshore and the docks, safety of small vessels (kayakers, camp children in canoes, paddle-boarders, small fishing dingys, et) will be adversely affected by this greatly increased traffic. Local knowledge of the area over-rides the proponent's estimation that wakes will not adversely affect these areas or recreation vessels. As a local recreational user with decades of local knowledge and experience, I know this to be untrue, as do all of the dock owners along the north and east shores of Gambier Island.

Carl Halvorson - Brackendale, British Columbia

I would like to voice my opposition to this project.

After only 16 years of minimum employment what will be the legacy of this project - a large effectively "dead" lake, devoid of any significant ecological value compared to the existing land - a working forest, with all its values will be removed from the ecosystem. Regardless of your views on forestry, forests in transition from logged through succession to mature forest have enormous value as terrestrial habitats - a mine's tailing pond loses these values forever. To create this lake, and supposedly ensure the continued viability of McNab Creek, two dams will have to be constructed and maintain in perpetuity. Who will do this after the 16 years of gravel extraction takes place? The upper dam (berm) ensures that McNab Creek will not leave its current course and do as all rivers do, meander across its floodplain. Failure of this upper berm (dike) would mean the total loss of the lower reaches of McNab Creek and probable failure of the lower dike as well. This l ower dike is intended to raise the water elevation in the proposed lake high enough to ensure McNab is not dewatered by groundwater loss in the underlying aquifer. How exactly is this ensured? Will there be long term monitoring of McNab Creek above the lake to ensure there is no leaching of groundwater from the creek? Who will pay for this long term monitoring and if it is done, how will the proponent be held responsible or mitigate for any damage? In the worst case scenario, if this scheme does not work, the lower reaches of the creek dry up and fish cannot enter the system at all - it's dead for fish except for those windows when there is enough rainfall and runoff to wet the creek to its mouth.

If our governing agencies, in their wisdom, give approval to this project, there must be significant assurances that McNab Creek will never lose flow through changes (loss) to underlying aquifers. There must be assurances with dollars and financial repercussions that effective long term monitoring will be done. There must be assurances that those same requirements are put in place for both dikes being created. There must be long term monitoring and responsibility to ensure viability of any habitats (replacement spawning channels) created as compensation for habitat loss, and there must be some kind of "value added" component in the proposed lake. If it "must" be done then there must be significantly more compensation for the loss of terrestrial habitats and alluvial fan features. If it is built why not require construction of wetland habitat margins of significant width on all borders of the lake - say 100 meters wide. The proposal does not include any habitat margin or transition. With shallow slopes into the lake and 100 meters of wetland on all margins there is at least some possible benefit - wouldn't it be nice to create wetlands - rather than fill them as we do for port, road or housing development?

The project is flawed, it will require long term monitoring and maintenance - who will do this when the gravel is gone?

The gravel extraction proposed will be removing one of the most precious resources in our area, clean alluvial gravels suitable for salmonid spawning habitats. In its current form, McNab Creek can meander across its floodplain, and wherever it goes through that process there will be good clean gravel for eggs to be deposited, mature and hatch in. There is that potential here for the ages to come. If this proposal goes through though it is likely the gravel industry's eyes will reach for the next "McNab Creek" to recreate this project and another important alluvial fan with its working successional forest will be converted into a tailing pond.

Sheila Pratt - Maple Ridge, British Columbia

I am not an expert. I will not receive payment for making my comments, unlike the lobbyists who stand to gain financially. I would just like to see our environment be given priority over the economy. After all, the economy is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the environment.

I understand the world-wide need for sand and gravel, however, considering the many companies that have "accidentally" or otherwise polluted our environment (and negatively affected the health of people as well as other living things), and then either walked away from the damage or denied responsibility for it, I hope Burnco will be required to pay up front for possible damage from their operations. The sum should be a meaningful sum, one that reflects the worst possible damage. Howe Sound will not continue its recovery unless those who might accidentally, or just carelessly, pollute cover the costs before hand. Hopefully prepayment will encourage them to not pollute.

Bruce Townson - Williamsons Landing, Howe Sound, British Columbia

I have the following concerns on the impact of the mine:

1) Environmental impact on land, bird and marine wildlife including:
a) disturbance and destruction of habitat, including upstream and foreshore;
b) impact of light and noise;
c) changes in fresh and tidal water quality due to sediment and prop wash and increased wave activity;

2) Residential/recreation/tourism impact on paddlers exploring the Sea to Sky Marine trail, recreational fishermen, and recreational boaters as a result of
a) visual impact;
b) noise; (beyond the immediate underwater pit area, it will be hard to mitigate noise along the waterfront and across the water);
c) artificial lighting;

3) Local impact on the property owners in McNab Creek and along Gambier Island, particularly the north and east coastlines.

The argument that there will be minimal environmental impact because the land has historically been used for logging and forestry is inadequate. Howe Sound is just starting to recover from those years of heavy logging, mining, and industrial use. While Howe Sound will always remain a mixed use body of water, the risk associated with the cumulative impact of increasing industrial activity in the area is high - particularly given the very significant impact historical industrial development has caused and which is taking decades to recover from. Given the proximity to the Lower Mainland, the potential to expand tourism and recreational use of Howe Sound is immense. Disturbing and damaging the shoreline reduces that potential, possibly permanently.

I understand that the Sunshine Coast needs a diverse and sustainable economy, which requires a strong environment and co-existence with residential needs. In this particular situation, I think that the environmental concerns outweigh any possible economic benefit.

Graham Ross - Vancouver, British Columbia

I am opposed to the Burnco proposal.

I believe the environmental assessment is inadequate. Howe Sound has seen a huge increase in wildlife in the past decade, from orcas and porpoises to sardines, which will be threatened by this kind of development.

The basic premise of the environmental assessment is that since the area was used for logging and forestry in the past, there will be not significant impact on the environment. This argument completely ignores the recovery that has occurred in Howe Sound.

The minimal proposed economic benefit of the gravel pit does not justify the risk to the environment and the growing tourism industry.

September 24, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Langley, British Columbia

Given the history of polluting companies that have walked away from paying for environmental damage, we think the onus should be on Burnco to pay up front for possible environmental damage from their operations. They should be required to submit a financial bond (in the tens of millions of dollars range) before environmental approval is given. This will safeguard communities and cover costs for environmental protection, site reclamation and damages from accidents.

We need to learn from past mistakes. Nurturing Howe Sound's marine recovery means making polluters pay — before they set up shop near communities

Andrea Townson - Vancouver and Howe Sound, British Columbia

I have the following concerns on the impact of the mine:

1) Environmental impact on land, bird and marine wildlife including
a) disturbance and destruction of habitat, including upstream and foreshore;
b) impact of light and noise;
c) changes in fresh and tidal water quality due to sediment and prop wash and increased wave activity;

2) Recreation/tourism impact on paddlers exploring the Sea to Sky Marine trail, recreational fishermen, and recreational boaters as a result of
a) visual impact;
b) noise; (beyond the immediate underwater pit area, it will be hard to mitigate noise along the waterfront and across the water);
c) artificial lighting;

3) Local impact on the recreational property owners in McNab Creek and along Gambier Island, particularly the north and east coastlines.

The argument that there will be minimal environmental impact because the land has historically been used for logging and forestry is inadequate. Howe Sound is just starting to recover from those years of heavy logging, mining, and industrial use. While Howe Sound will always remain a mixed use body of water, I do not think we truly understand the cumulative impact of increasing industrial activity in the area. Given the proximity to the Lower Mainland, the potential to expand tourism and recreational use of Howe Sound is immense. Disturbing and damaging the shoreline reduces that potential, possibly permanently.

I understand that the Sunshine Coast needs a diverse and sustainable economy. However, in this particular situation, I think that the environmental concerns outweigh any possible economic benefit.

Byron Bona - North Vancouver, British Columbia

My Major concern is that the mine project is totally for the economic benefit of Burnco. All risk is taken by the people of BC while Burnco reaps the profits. We are asked to give Burnco a "non-renwable" resource, sand and gravel, and chance environment disruption. In return Burnco benefits by a reduction in transportation costs.

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver Island, British Columbia

I support development of the Burnco aggregate project

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

My daughters are 4th generation Howe Sound residents. Their great grandfather and his sons rowed to their small cabin in Christie cove each weekend all the way from False creek. We have lived in Gibsons and have family on Bowen Island as well as a 60 year ownership in a co-op acerage on Bowyer Island. Howe Sound is our back yard and was poisoned and dying from the blanket of wood wase covering its whole floor from Woodfiber mill out to beyond Gibsons. No shrimp or fish were flourishing due to this polution. With the efforst of our environmental steward the Sound if finally recovering and it's fragile ecosystem must be protected. There would be much more reward and many more jobs from eco tourism. Do not destroy that lovely valley and sound with the greed and disrespct evidenced from the other gravel projects in the area. No money can replace the beauty of this place.

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

Hello,

Hereby, I write you my comments for the Application for an Environmental Assessment by the Burnco aggregate mine — located between Gibsons and Squamish and proposed for McNab Creek, the second-largest salmon-bearing stream in the region.

I am very concerned that this project will damage the fish habitat and fish, particularly chum and coho salmon.

Given the history of polluting companies that have walked away from paying for environmental damage, I belief that Bunco should pay up front for possible environmental damage from their operations. They should be required to submit a financial bond (in the tens of millions of dollars range) before environmental approval is given. This will safeguard communities and cover costs for environmental protection, site reclamation and damages from accidents.

We need to learn from past mistakes. Nurturing Howe Sound's marine recovery means making polluters pay — before they set up shop near communities.

Thank you for considering my comments.

Best regards,

September 23, 2016

Terry Lawrence - Surrey, British Columbia

Require Burnco to post a $10 million cleanup bond before approving a permit.

Personal Information Withheld - Barry's Bay, Ontario

Please consider the cost of an environmental disaster in allowing the Burnco Aggregate Mine Project to go ahead. The potential is there to destroy one of the most beautiful habitats in the world. At the very least, make this company setup a trust that would cover the costs of an environmental disaster, as the track record for companies to pay after the fact is very dismal. Such a policy should be in place for any potentially damaging projects, if they are deemed necessary.

Personal Information Withheld - Bowen Island, British Columbia

My concern is the Howe sound as I live on Bowen Island and swim in the ocean almost everyday in the summer. But truly more importantly value, honor, and respect the animals that live in the ocean. It is not ok that even a slight chance of disaster could affect them for our own selfish human interests.

What is being done to 100% take away the risk of harm to their home? The Howe Sound?

Personal Information Withheld - Coquitlam, British Columbia

Given the history of polluting companies that have walked away from paying for environmental damage, we think the onus should be on Burnco to pay up front for possible environmental damage from their operations. They should be required to submit a financial bond (in the tens of millions of dollars range) before environmental approval is given. This will safeguard communities and cover costs for environmental protection, site reclamation and damages from accidents.

We need to learn from past mistakes. Nurturing Howe Sound's marine recovery means making polluters pay — before they set up shop near communities.

Angelika Hackett - Burnaby, British Columbia

Given the history of polluting companies that have walked away from paying for environmental damage, we think the onus should be on Burnco to pay up front for possible environmental damage from their operations. They should be required to submit a financial bond (in the tens of millions of dollars range) before environmental approval is given. This will safeguard communities and cover costs for environmental protection, site reclamation and damages from accidents.

We need to learn from past mistakes. Nurturing Howe Sound's marine recovery means making polluters pay — before they set up shop near communities.

Shawn Groff - Vancouver, British Columbia

The gravel and sand mine could damage fish habitat and fish, particularly chum and coho.

Given the history of polluting companies that have walked away from paying for environmental damage, the onus should be on Burnco to pay up front for possible environmental damage from their operations. They should be required to submit a financial bond (in the tens of millions of dollars range) before environmental approval is given. This will safeguard communities and cover costs for environmental protection, site reclamation and damages from accidents.

We need to learn from past mistakes. Nurturing Howe Sound's marine recovery means making polluters pay — before they set up shop near communities.

Joseph Bowes - North Vancouver, British Columbia

BURNCO McNab Valley Aggregate Mine ... PLEASE STOP THIS TRAVESTY IN HOWE SOUND

As one of the 400+ families of Burrard Yacht Club that will be directly affected by this proposed project, my wife and I ask you to STOP THIS NOW. And we're asking you to act for more than us alone.

Here is why:

1. The project promises at best a few jobs and meager government revenues - so why despoil Howe Sound this way? ... and which precludes the other jobs and revenues related to the recreational and residential uses this area enjoys now and in future.

2. Risks to commercial shipping - The 'new' Burnco tug+barge traffic will be added to all of the shipping congestion daily for 15 to 20 years! - both current and planned - and notably from the 'other' planned expansions of Port Metro Vancouver shipping. And there is lots of shipping traffic today, let alone in future when it will include the 'new' Burnco tug+barge traffic and significant planned 'new' LNG and oil tanker traffic. All of this shipping traffic has to 'transit' both our local 'metro' waters (and LNG terminals are planned for Howe Sound) as well as the entire southern Gulf of Georgia - which includes the challenges of shipping route 'convergence' at the mouth of the Fraser River - known as Sandheads with its very real and substantial hazards during tide changes against prevailing winds, especially during frequent winter storms - and the restricted 'passages' between the American San Juan Islands and the Canadian Gulf Islands.

3. Risks to BC Ferries - All of Tug+barge traffic will 'cross' multiple BC Ferries routes daily for 15 to 20 years!

4. The ongoing desecration of the pristine McNab Valley, carried out over 15-20 years has significant societal costs that Burnco will not be paying. In other words, every other 'user' of Howe Sound will pay. NOT Burnco. The fish and flora and fauna will pay. NOT Burnco.

5. In today's day and age, how is it possible to not recognize the obvious recreational, environmental, and social costs - the 'externalities' - that Burnco has ignored in its project submissions.

6. Noise-pollution 24 x 7 x 365 x 15 to 20 years, and Burnco will NOT pay - and I do not for a moment believe the self-serving and absurd noise estimates provided by Burnco.

7. Sight-pollution forever, and exactly the same as what is 'growing' now above the town-site of Gibsons (also on Howe Sound) and Sechelt (on the Sunshine Coast). Enough already.

8. The unique recreational and environmental attributes of the McNab Valley, which happens to be a very easily accessible 36 km (22 mi) from downtown Vancouver, will be lost forever. And these competing uses by Metro Vancouver residents, tourists, and Howe Sound 'locals' alike, have been conveniently ignored by Burnco.

Frankly, the very serious negative impacts of this project are an affront, today and forever into future, to:

1. Every Metro Vancouver citizen and taxpayer,

2. Any 'on-the-water' or 'back-country' tourist - local or 'from-away', hiker, kayaker, hunter, fisher, cruise boat passengers, etc, etc - who would 'rec-re-ate' in any way at all in Howe Sound,

3. The very effective "Super Natural BC" marketing expense and branding efforts, dating back a decade or so now, and

4. Every tourism-related job in this great Province.

Please do not let the 'travesty' of the BURNCO McNab Valley Aggregate Mine progress any further.

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

Howe Sound is one of the most beautiful fjords in the world and a BC landmark on the Sea to Sky corridor. Howe Sound is the home to a great variety of mammals, fish, frogs, rare birds and invertebrates. It supports jobs in the local economy, especially tourism which has a significant ripple effect through the region's economy, and brings pleasure to thousands of locals and tourists every year.

We all cherish and celebrate the recovery of Howe Sound after decades of toxic pollution from heavy industry. BC taxpayers paid millions to clean up the Britannia mine in Howe Sound and now finally those actions, along with other conservation efforts, are paying off with the return of fish stocks, dolphins, orcas, whales and a proliferation of bald eagles and other wildlife.

Please bring to an end the proposed Burnco open pit mine before massive economic harm is caused to thousands of local residents and businesses including our film and tourism industries as well as countless dollars have been spent by both BC and Federal regulators evaluating whether the environmental destruction of a portion of this sensitive ecosystem can be "mitigated". We support the creation of a long term comprehensive land and water use plan for economic and social activities in the region that are compatible with sustainable uses of the Howe Sound.

We ask you to stop this ill-advised project that will destroy a portion of this amazing natural resource, all for the sake of the short term profits of a mining company.

Thank you.

Pat Gibbs - Maple Ridge, British Columbia

Resource extraction companies have a terrible record of avoiding damage to the environment and a worse record of cleaning up the mess they made. Make sure they pay for cleanup (hundreds of millions of dollars) before they start to make their mess or taxpayers will be on the hook for the costs and that will make me very angry.

C. Charles Rudd - Bowen Island, British Columbia

No to any further Mining or Heavy Industry in Howe Sound and Region.

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Lynne Zimmerman - McNab Creek, British Columbia

I am writing today in response to Burnco application for a gravel pit at McNabb Creek estuary. As a long time resident of McNab Creek I must express my opposition to this project. I believe our Polite questions to Burnco were taken as cooperation. Contrary to what Burnco has suggested we are not in favour of a gravel pit. Reading through their application they have many of their fax incorrect. Too many to list, but I will touch base on a few.

The land that our community sits on was purchased August 6, 1968. The sunshine coast regional district granted residential zoning for this area. One of the original developers can Townson is still a member of our community. In the early 70s he began bringing cabins up by barge from Richmond and developed our community. Cabins at that time were selling for $180,000. Since Burnco's intentions were made public seven years ago, property values have dropped, and been stagnant. No one wants to invest across from an area where proposed gravel pit may be approved. While the rest of Vancouver and the lower mainland have experienced huge increases in their residential values hours continues to drop and be of no interest to people looking for recreational enjoyment.

I would like to express what this community has meant to us. This community because of its remoteness and it's lack of power and services, has been a blessing in disguise's. Many of the residents have been at McNabb for many years we have spent our summers there each year, with our children, and now grandchildren. We enjoy a way of life there, without technology out of TVs, phones, and Electricity, that is hard to describe. It is a place where there is conversation at dinner, games to be played on the beach,fishing and hiking and swimming. Where we must help each other because there is no one else to call. We have become a community of very close neighbors. Our community and our way of life that we have cherished over the last 40 years is at risk of coming to an end.

This proposed Burnco gravel pit will be 150 feet deep in the middle of one of the last estuaries, and the only beach in the Howe Sound. It will adversely affect thousands of people at the yacht clubs, kids camps and most directly our community. It is directly across the river from our residences (450 feet) and the noise levels they have proposed are unacceptable and unrealistic. There are huge discrepancies in their testing of predictive noise levels.

The only people we see that stand to gain by this, is Burnco. The loss of property values at McNab and Gambier island as well as the social and economic losses for the towns and businesses in tourism dollars,will be largely felt. Hearing from Burrard yacht club, ( one of three yacht clubs on Gambier island) stating their club has spent roughly $250,000 in Gibsons and Pender Harbour on fuel, groceries, restaurants, etc. I can only imagine the losses when you add all the communities together, that will no longer want to spend their recreational time in a noisy industrial area. The economic impact on local businesses in the Howe Sound will be largely felt.

The McNab Creek estuary remains both rare and productive. It is a living breathing science project directly opposite our community, and we use this remote and Pristine area to educate our children/grandchildren the value of conservation, love and respect of nature, for their children and all generations to come.

We at McNab Creek community have paid our taxes for 40 years towards schools, libraries, infrastructure, and services that we do not have in our area. We ask that you consider, our community, and our contribution over many years of taxes paid. We ask that you recognize how this directly contradicts the sunshine coast mission statement. We also ask that you do not turn a slow and struggling recovery of our beautiful Howe Sound back to the industrial past.

Sincerely Lynne Zimmerman
22 year resident of McNabb creek

Adam Wray - West Vancouver, British Columbia

As a concerned resident of the Howe Sound region, I do not support this project. The ecosystems it will undoubtedly effect are intrinsically linked with thousands of others, and the ripple impact could be incredibly detrimental to the health of our region. For the sake of my generation and those to come, please consider these impacts and halt this project.

Barry Cogswell - Vancouver, British Columbia

Over the past 200 years, but most markedly since the middle of the 20th Century, we have massively increased the wealth of humans by our resource extraction and industry. We have also dangerously increased the human population to unsustainable numbers. Now our belief in infinite growth is leading the planet and our contemporary civilization to collapse. The indications of that inevitable collapse are many and obvious. It is time we designed a new economic model that is intended for sustainable growth and lasting security. A first step, to finding a sustainable economic model, will be to leave as many resources in the ground as possible, especially those extraction projects with the probability of doing serious ecological harm. We must do this until we can see an intelligent way ahead. We will need a way that will neither destroy the planet's ecological integrity nor the security and future prospects of our descendants.

For further Info see book: To Have Borne Witness by same author.

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

We cannot risk the 2nd largest salmon run. Don't allow this mine to go ahead. concerns The gravel and sand mine could damage fish habitat and fish, particularly chum and coho.

Personal Information Withheld - New Westminister, British Columbia

There should be no reason to not pay up front for environmental damage. If there is a plan for environmental reclamation then the money should be there anyway. It's should be pretty simple, especially with the environmental history with company's like Burnco and the current state of OUR environment.

Personal Information Withheld - West Vancouver, British Columbia

Burnco must provide an up-front deposit to cover future restoration costs

Christina Kosiancic - North Vancouver, British Columbia

The Howe sound is a recovering ecosystem. A migratory route for salmon. Jeopardizing this natural resource for another mine that's pollutes the environment is STUPID & should be prevented. Think of the environmental cost not big corporate profits!

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

We need to learn from past mistakes. Nurturing Howe Sound's marine recovery means making polluters pay — before they set up shop near communities.

Len Shaw - Surrey, British Columbia

I agree with Theresa Beer who wrote:

"Given the history of polluting companies that have walked away from paying for environmental damage, we think the onus should be on Burnco to pay up front for possible environmental damage from their operations. They should be required to submit a financial bond (in the tens of millions of dollars range) before environmental approval is given. This will safeguard communities and cover costs for environmental protection, site reclamation and damages from accidents."

This should be adopted as standard for such projects. We taxpayers are unfairly paying the clean-up costs for corporations. I want my dollars used for protecting the environment, not salvaging toxic remnants from irresponsible industry.

Alan Lewis - Vancouver, British Columbia

Prepayment is required for many jobs -- prepayment for cleanup and revitalization of a sand & gravel operation area seems appropriate.

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

Protecting Howe Sound, and protecting the nearby major salmon-bearing stream - those serious protections cost money. I'd hope for a very large 'protection' bond as surety for any damage (pollution, major disturbance of sand/gravel and overflow) to this environment.

Personal Information Withheld - Roberts Bank, British Columbia

Probably a good idea to have Burnco post a fairly significant bond to insure environmental cleanup actually takes place.

Jessica Carson - Vancouver, British Columbia

The proponent, Burnco, should be required to pay up front for possible environmental damage from their operations before environmental approval is given. We need to know that they will be accountable for any environmental degradation caused by their mining operations.

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

Companies mining in BC should have to pay for possible environmental damage before finalizing a permit not after the project is finished.

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

The Burnco aggregate mine — located between Gibsons and Squamish and proposed for McNab Creek, the second-largest salmon-bearing stream in the region, will be an environmental threat for the region and for BC.

While some are raising concerns that the gravel and sand mine could damage fish habitat and fish, particularly chum and coho, others are hopeful that proposed end-of-project reclamation work will restore the environment.

Given the history of polluting companies that have walked away from paying for environmental damage, we think the onus should be on Burnco to pay up front for possible environmental damage from their operations. They should be required to submit a financial bond (in the tens of millions of dollars range) before environmental approval is given. This will safeguard communities and cover costs for environmental protection, site reclamation and damages from accidents.

We need to learn from past mistakes. Nurturing Howe Sound's marine recovery means making polluters pay — before they set up shop near communities.

Helen May - Vancovuer, British Columbia

Yes! Burnco must be held accountable for environmental assessment of the impact their mine has and will have on the salmon and surrounding environment.

Personal Information Withheld - Burnaby, British Columbia

I camp at Porteau Cove and ski at Whistler and have lived in Squamish. I watched Howe Sound go from Dead to Recovered over the past 40 years. Please don't let it get ruined yet again.

Given the history of polluting companies that have walked away from paying for environmental damage, the onus should be on Burnco to pay up front for possible environmental damage from their operations. They should be required to submit a financial bond (in the tens of millions of dollars range) before environmental approval is given. This will safeguard communities and cover costs for environmental protection, site reclamation and damages from accidents.

Chavah Avraham - Vancouver, British Columbia

In light of past experience it is entirely reasonable that Burnco guarantee reclamation funds in advance of initiating their project. It would be nice if they could be trusted to exercise responsibility but such corporations have proved such trust to be unfounded.

Personal Information Withheld - Salt Spring, British Columbia

I feel that it is better to be prepared than to find a situation, at the end of a contract or other agreement, in which the person/company responsible for damages to an environmental area must be forced into some remediation work. Therefore, why not have the companies who wish to engage in dealing in an area that is environmentally sensitive, put up a bond that will cover any eventuality and not leave the tax-payers of BC on the hook for it.

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

I am going to make this short because it's so obvious it's stupid! Howe Sound needs to be protected. It's one of the most beautiful places in the world. People come from all over the world just to drive along its shoreline. Why are you guys even entertaining the idea of more industry on it?

Please wake up and protect it now!

Clara George - Lions Bay, British Columbia

Please respect the environmental importance of Howe Sound and reject the Burnco proposal.

We count on governments to protects its people and its natural resources. No respected scientist think this project is a good idea.

Save Howe Sound!

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

Healthy oceans and human wellbeing comes before ergonomic gain and industry. We make too many mistakes that are only realized in hindsight - this mine and the harm it can/will do is one of those mistakes.
Please don't open the mine.

Jackie Campbell - Pitt Meadows, British Columbia

This is a fantastic idea and should be the standard for all industry in sensitive habitat. The government no doubt scream this is an anti incentive for industry but I think it's time has come.

Personal Information Withheld - Ottawa, Ontario

We should require that Burnco submit an environmental protection financial bond (in the tens of millions of dollars range) before environmental approval is given.

Given the history of polluting companies that have walked away from paying for environmental damage, I think the onus should be on Burnco to pay up front for possible environmental damage from their operations. This will safeguard communities and cover costs for environmental protection, site reclamation and damages from accidents.

We need to learn from past mistakes. Nurturing Howe Sound's marine recovery means making polluters pay — before they set up shop near communities.

September 22, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

September 22, 2016

Re: Burnco Aggregate Project

As a property owner in Howe Sound I am opposed to the Burnco mining project. McNab Creek Estuary provides nutrient rich stream waters that fertilize the ocean and create rich and productive ecologies. It is a delicate ecosystem still recovering from past logging. Approval of the Burnco proposal will return the area to an industrial zone.

Despite Burnco's proposed mitigation measures, damage to this recovering ecosystem will be unavoidable.

Environmental Concerns:

  • Damage to salmon, herring and other marine life
  • Noise from gravel crushing affecting wild life
  • Disruption to the elk, an at risk species
  • Lighting during construction and operation causing further disruption to life in the area
  • Compromised air quality due to emissions
  • Increased barge traffic in Howe Sound
  • Overall damage to the estuary and surrounding area that comes with industrial development

Howe Sound has been returning to its natural beauty, creating tourism, recreational opportunities and vibrant communities. We have seen the return of dolphins and whales, indicators of ecological recovery. The Burnco Aggregate Project does not fit our values. Please say no to this project and preserve the delicate ecosystem of Howe Sound and its diverse local economies.

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

On Sept. 14th I attended the public information session sponsored by Burnco and I felt sick to my stomach. It was set up like a science fair and they were giving out honey! It was such a joke! The Howe Sound is at risk of facing a serious environmental problem if Burnco is given the go ahead to put a proposed mine at McNab creek. I am pleading with you and all your powers at be to do whatever is necessary to shut this down as soon as possible.

McNab creek flows into a productive estuary flourishing with marine life. The valley has many species at risk that this mine threatens. We all know that the Departments of Fisheries and Oceans expressed strong concern about the project's impact to fish and fish habitat but seems to scared to fight the fight. The Howe Sound has finally made a remarkable recovery after decades of industrial abuse and is finally being recognized by local recreational enthusiasts as a premier local destination.

A day in this area is actually more spectacular than any of the more commercialized venues such as Grouse Mountain, Capilano Suspension Bridge or the Sea to Sky Gondola – why would you want to let this be destroyed!!??

It's only been within the past 20-30 years that this area has slowly been discovered by many passionate, highly educated and hard working recreationalist that have purchased land in this area. There are so many attractions in Howe Sound and one of them is its spectacular scenery and peacefulness. Surely there is more value in recreational land than a gravel mine.

Any industrial noise is sure to spoil this, especially the noise from rock crushers reverberating off the mountains surrounding the site and the ocean. I notice that there was no mention of rock crushing in their Burnco's report. Apparently, Burnco did a sound study but they put the noise sensor in a remote location which was no where close to the recreational cottages, yacht clubs, kids camps or residences at McNab Creek. They seem oblivious to the fact that sound travels over water! I also can't see how the baby salmon will tolerate the noise vibrations in the spanning channel which is so close to their operation.

This area has so much more to offer than industrial insatiability. Please consider the value of this spectacular place so close to the city with so much peace, quiet and majestic beauty. We will fight hard to keep it that way. I hope we can count on your support too!

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Howe Sound is just coming back to life after being decimated by industry. It is finally cleaned up enough for fish, dolphins and whales to enjoy again and Burnco wants to destroy it. If they are allowed their greedy gravel operation, Howe Sound will be dead again into at least 2080....

Beverley Grantham - North Vancouver, British Columbia

There are more than 400 families, well over a thousand people, who regularly use both Ekins and Thunderbird outstations and enjoy the pristine vistas and calming silence they provide only hours from the huge noisy metropolis of Vancouver. McNab Creek and its valley must be preserved to ensure this gem is intact for future generations. To allow the destruction and ruin of Howe Sound, it's tourism, fishery, recreational enjoyment, marine and land animal habitats all for the sake of corporate greed and scant jobs is unconscionable and extremely short sighted.

allan sutherland - West Vancouver, British Columbia

I have been boating and hiking in the Howe Sound/Squamish area all my life. It is a beautiful, pristine area within a 30-60 minute boatride of Vancouver. There is no other area like this anywhere in proximity to Vancouver. As the population of Vancouver grows, so too do the demands on nearby recreational areas. This is the case with the Howe Sound/Gambier Island area. Boating, hiking, kayaking, water skiing and fishing, to name a few, are recreations that are growing in popularity in this area so close to Vancouver. To permit a gravel pit to operate in this beautiful recreational area would be shortsighted and most unfortunate.

Martin Richmond - Lions Bay, British Columbia

I'm opposed - the estuary is more important than the mine to me. The extra traffic in Howe Sound could be a safety issue.

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

In response to the public's concerns about the recovery of Howe Sound BURNCO stated "BURNCO understands your concerns for Howe Sound and is a proud steward of the project site and surrounding area,including Howe Sound. "
It would be helpful to know what ongoing work has been conducted to improve the existing fish compensation channel on the property. In 2001 DFO and HSLP signed an agreement under the Fisheries Act with the objective to ensure the loss of fish habitat due to the annual dredging of Rainy River is offset. What is the life of this commitment and wouldn't this condition carry over to any new owner of the property? If the compensation channel is not productive as intended, how has BURNCO invested in this channel on its property to fulfill the obligation?

Besides staff participating in a shoreline cleanup at other locations and installing bat boxes, what stewardship has BURNCO undertaken on its property and in Howe Sound to make ongoing improvements to the environmental recovery over the past eight years?

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

This has to be one of the most absurd projects i've seen considered. The Howe Sound has finally been rehabilitated with ocean life coming back. It has moved toward being a recreation center as opposed to a heavy industry center. You have to consider:

1. The vast amount of recreational zoning that has taken place recently in the Howe Sound. This mine will have a massive impact on the ability of residents and visitors to enjoy the sound.
2. The noise impact on ocean wildlife which has recently returned to the sound
3. The limited financial benefit to the province. It is clear there are very few jobs at stake. The future of the province is not in these types of projects.
4. Allowing a Calgary company in to BC to destroy our landscape is completely unacceptable.

Ruth Simons - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Sept 22nd

This comment was submitted during the draft AIR – with a response" An assessment of potential effects on a range of valued components, including acid rock drainage and consequences on water drainage will be provided in the EAC Application/EIS." Were these reports referred to in this comment received and referenced?

Ted Franklin - Lions Bay, British Columbia To Mr. Gerry Hamblin (Project Assesment Manager) Acid Drainage will destroy the McNabb Creek River and Estuary as well as continue to leach into the soil and ocean for many years to come. I have two detailed reports, one is a Geochemical Report Owner Silverado Mines Operator Tri-Con Mining Mineral Resources Assessment Report#7935 performed at NcNabb Creek dated March 12, 1980 by Wayne Morton P. Eng and Geologist. Mr. Morton and associates did a detailed study of McNabb Creek. 370 samples were collected from the McNabb Creek Area and shipped to Chemex Labs in North Vancouver for analysis. Page 2 of the report the Geoligist concludes that " Mineralization is in the form of Pyrite, chalcopyrite and molybdenite with minor bornite. Sulphides may occur either on dry fractures or accompany quartz veinlets". Sulphide grains are are altered to hematite and the surface of the exposed bedrock is fresh" 3The second report is from Enridge Pipelines which details the Howe Sound Sea To Sky Highway Project as an example of extremely high levels of Sulphites that are exposed when rocks were blasted or crushed in Howe Sound and the problems of how to remove the acidic rock and the acid water created as the sulphite is exposed to oxygen and water. The report ststes that Pyrite has extremely high sulphites released which causes acidic water and destroys life in creeks, rivers and oceans and stays in the soil and must be contained and removed properly. The Geologist report states that Pyrite is found in abundance in the McNabb Creek Valley. When I attended your recent meeting at Glen Eagles I asked the Burnco representative Geologist the question concerning Acid Drainage and he told me that there wwas no concern or Sulphitic rocks in McNabb Creek. I also was told by yourself at the presentation that Burnco will perform the mineral study and the samples will be sent to the laboratory that they choose. Then you mentioned that our Mining department will review the results. I hope that you review the unbiased report performed by Mr. Murton and will acknowledge that there will be high levels of sulphites exposed when the rock is crushed and when it interacts with the 150 inches of annual rainfall McNabb Creek Valley receives and oxygen it will destroy the McNabb Creek River, leach into the soil and ground water and continue to destroy our Pristine Mountain Valley Watershed, Estuary and Destroy what nature has created for thousands of years the Howe Sound Ocean Marine Environment Forever. The second report is from Northern Gateway Pipelines and outlines the identification and mitigation of Acid Rock Drainage. They use the Sea To Sky Highway Expansion as their example where acid was created once the rock was crushed in Howe Sound and the toxic effect it has on the environment. On behalf of all of the existing Citizens of Canada, The World and our Future Generations and the citizens around our world who come here to enjoy one of the few remaining untouched Beautiful Landscapes and Marine Life left on our Planet to not allow the gravel mine to proceed. We must leave a legacy for future generations and continue to work together to rebuild The Howe Sound water quality and return the Marine Life back to its' former Glory before a previous mine destroyed the Howe Sound Environment. I will send you the two detailed reports to your email address that you provided to me at the presentation.

Ruth Simons - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Short term jobs, and minimal permanent jobs need to be offset against the loss of opportunity for other jobs resulting from this gravel mine such as jobs related to the construction industry and services provided to the other property owners in the area.

BURNCO currently purchases its supply from other sources in the province so the rationale for this mine is to benefit BURNCO with no benefit accruing to the future generations. Mr. Scott Burns, CEO of BURNCO was overheard stating at the public information meeting that the financial losses incurred from this operation in BC will be carried over to offset profits from his Alberta operation. It is logical a corporation would structure their companies to ensure they pay the least taxes. The longer BURNCO can spread out the losses from this operation the greater benefit to the owners.

The communities around Howe Sound have been calling on the government for a comprehensive land and marine use plan for many years now. The assessment by the proponent's consultant on the socio-economic impacts of any one project on the long term future of Howe Sound should is not good enough.

BURNCO's business case, according to the Operations Manager is based on 4 10 hour shifts and 6,000 tonne barge loads that take 3 hours to load, one barge load every other day. BURNCO's story boards and some of the BURNCO staff at the public information sessions stated the maximum to be mined is 16 million tons over 16 years, but the EA states 20 million tons. What limits the amount of aggregate and the life of the project? What assurances do the public have this project will not expand? Responses from BURNCO staff were vague.

It is stated in the documentation that "The actual commercially-extractable aggregate resource volume will be revised depending upon the information and design of the mine plan and the aggregate resource evaluation, but is expected to average 1,000,000 tons per year." Previous studies suggest 51 million tons or 46.5 million tons. Can BURNCO confirm and/or commit to only mining the amount described in the Environmental Assessment Certificate application? What is the probability of BURNCO expanding the mine after the aggregate resource evaluation? What is the current aggregate resource evaluation? Can BURNCO confirm the 20 million tons is the extent of the excavation or is it marketable gravel (meaning more than 20 million tons will eventually be extracted)?

There is conflicting information in the application. Some VC sections state that the construction period will be up to 2 years, whereas in other sections (e.g., noise) it states that construction will be 4 months. Can BURNCO confirm? What is the forecasted demand for aggregate in the Lower Mainland during the life of the proposed project? What is the supply of aggregate from all sources in the Lower Mainland during the proposed project? How can BURNCO be sure that the project will not significantly affect the ecological thresholds , self-sustaining populations and the ecological resilience of marine resources in Howe Sound?

Where does it prove BC will be at a crisis in terms of gravel supply? There are many BC based businesses operators currently supplying the market. Many gravel operators along our coast are shipping their gravel outside the province (Sechelt mine). If the local market was in crisis, shouldn't keeping BC's natural resource within the province be a priority? What proof or condition is placed on the proponent to require them to supply the local demands? The gravel from McNab Creek would be shipped to BURNCO's existing facilities replacing the gravel it currently purchases from other suppliers up the coast thereby replacing current jobs, not guaranteeing additional jobs in the market. What is the impact on the current suppliers to BURNCO and has this offsetting been factored into the labor market calculations?

Ruth Simons - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Terrestrial Vegetation and Economic impacts – In a 1997 21 minute aerial view of McNab Creek and the valley proposed to be mined, shows this area well covered by forest. Has the economic and environmental value of removing trees permanently from this area been fully considered into the economic gains and losses? From the EA: "The Proposed Project Area evaluated during the baseline assessment was approximately 70 ha in size; subsequent refinement of the Project equates to a footprint of 59.9 ha. The footprint is primarily situated within previously harvested areas."

When speaking with the Golder Consultants and BURNCO representatives at the public information sessions, their narrative was this area has been previously industrialized due to logging. This seemed to be a rationalization for mining. The EA Summary states: "Much of the Proposed Project area is in various stages of regeneration following logging".

This project area has a privately managed forest and forestry is at least renewable. Even during growth, trees and vegetation provide habitat for wildlife. According the Natural Capital assessment for Howe Sound conducted by Suzuki Foundation – Molnar 2014, the value of ecosystem benefits from forests is on the low end $5,045 up to $11,820 per hectare.

Replacing a renewable enterprise with a non-sustainable one is not in the best interest of the future generations. Where and how is the loss of revenue from the permanent removal of trees calculated?

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Land Use, Social and Economic impacts:

The current Rural zoning reflects land use as determined by the Sunshine Coast Regional District. BURNCO has submitted an application for rezoning however, this application has not made any progress. BURNCO must assume this zoning will be changed as an alternative plan is vague. The knowledge it will forever be a major disruption to this area, particularly to the immediate neighbors and users of this area that value the peace and opportunity to be off grid. BURNCO claims it will bring value to the neighbors by providing power to their homes however, these property owners have chosen this way of life the value of which cannot be measured. Generations of people have enjoyed the privately held land next to this proposed mine.

This area has been frequented by thousands of children over the decades from nearby children's camps and recreation areas. The property owners, outstations, campers, kayakers and anglers that come to McNab Creek do so to enjoy the peace and quiet. Intermittent disturbance from logging, the odd cruise ship passing are nothing in comparison to the constant disturbance from the noise of this gravel mine.

Howe Sound currently has industrial zoned areas. Increasing industrial activity in the quiet areas valued for recreation is contrary the best use of this land.

The Social Impacts under the Environmental Assessment is the most flawed part of this process. During the first round of public comments, the proponent and those determining the "Valued Components" seem to have dismissed the many comments from the public. Where is it reflected in the "value components the many comments related to the need for a long term plan for the Howe Sound region? Comments that reflect the social/emotional value are dismissed - for example: "My Father is now approaching his 80th Birthday and he is still going to McNab every weekend May thru September to continue improving his most treasured spot. He is not alone though, my Brother and I along with 6 grandchildren are there as well! We can't get enough of the beautiful scenery, quite peaceful days and the clean fresh air. McNab Creek is not only my father's life line it is his legacy!". Comments such as this reflect the sentiments of those that value the more remote parts of Howe Sound. "Pasley Island is located in the southwest part of Howe Sound, and is inhabited by a community of over 200 people who have seasonal residences located on the perimeter of the island. Residents are governed by the Islands Trust and the Sechelt Regional District. No utility services are provided from the mainland. Our residents treasure the existing natural environment, and stewardship of resources is a community priority. Our residents engage in many water sports and many kinds of fishing."

The process minimizes and dismisses the emotional connection people have with this area. The only "valued components" assessed under the social impacts are any need for additional housing or emergency services. How is it justified to dismiss these emotional but very important social values?

No survey or consultations has been conducted by the proponent to quantify the real economic or social impact of this project, however there are thousands of people who have signed a petition opposing this gravel mine at McNab Creek.

BURNCO's approach is "you call us" if you want to know more but there is no evidence of BURNCO having proactively sought out its neighbors in the area since they purchased the property.

September 21, 2016

Jay Werner - Langley, British Columbia

I am totally against this project. Howe Sound is a place my family spends a lot of time. We have seen dolphins playing, others have seen orcas. Just two weeks ago my four year old son and I were crabbing just off Mcnabb creek. We had beached our dinghy and we're playing in the mud on shore building lifetime memories. Our yacht clubs' very popular outstation is across the bay. I would be very saddened to see this special place ruined by an industrial gravel plant with barge traffic too!!

Henry Gerber - North Vancouver, British Columbia

This project will adversely affect the value of our property at Ekins Point that my Yacht Club (Burrard Yacht Club) has developed over the last 25 years. It will largely destroy the serene quiet of air and water, has a high risk of pollution not withstanding Burnco's hopes, will destroy the last pristine valley in Howe sound and the only sand beach in the Sound, is a serious risk to the wonderful increase in the return of Herring, Salmon, Dolphins and Whales. In other words it will directely and badly affect the enjoyement of our property for our 400 members.

This in light of the minimal benefit to BC people; the main gain will be Burnco, and we will lose the wonder and magic of this place for 3 generations (including recovery time).

I realize that Burnco has contributed over a quarter of a million dollars to my BC Liberal Government! Don't let that influence your decision. Decide in the favour of the several million people of the lower mainland who want this Sound saved.

Rob Stokes - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Please accept this submission as opposition to the proposed gravel pit located at McNab Creek by BURNCO. The entire north end of Howe Sound is finally showing signs of environmental recovery after years of sustained commercial use and abuse. To allow such a gravel pit to be created/maintained would not only partially destroy one of the last pristine valleys in the area, but would also jeopardize the natural healing of both land and sea that's now occurring. The risk is simply not worth it.

In addition to this, the area is now becoming more and more popular as an area of recreation - used by boaters (power and sail), hikers, divers, kayakers/canoeists and beach goers etc.. Two vital yacht clubs (Burrard and Thunderbird) are pro-active stakeholders in foreshore lands directly across from the proposed site and as active stewards of their respective properties, stand to be extremely negatively impacted should the proposal proceed.

I'm in favour of the responsible use of natural resources to assist in driving an economy. But in this case, the economic benefit to the public is far outweighed by the economic benefit to BURNCO themselves. There is virtually zero benefit to local business and to local people themselves – no benefit to the public as a whole. Anticipated employment numbers are low - anticipated community benefit is also low.

Some projects make sense - this is not one of them. Some projects require the public to "suck it up" as the project is for the benefit of the population - this is not one of them. And some projects provide such a positive economic gain that they truly deserve to be viewed under diffuse light - this is not one of them.

This project fails on many fronts - so many in fact that it simply cannot be allowed to proceed. I respectfully request that you deny this application and work with BURNCO to find an alternate source of gravel that does not have the same adverse effect on so many people and on such fantastic lands.

Personal Information Withheld - West Vancouver, British Columbia

I feel very strongly that there should be NO industrial developmet like this in Howe Sound

Stephen Burgoyne - Nelson, British Columbia

Let's get digging as soon as possible.

September 20, 2016

Ruth Simons - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Cumulative Effects - The Box Canyon Run of the River project is upstream from the Burnco project and within the Local Study Area. The concern is that residual effects of the Box Canyon project have not been appropriately assessed. According to Golder's Environmental assessment report many of the studies used as baseline are several years old, and the Box Canyon project was not anticipated to be starting until 2017:
Projects and Activities considered in the Cumulative Effects: Volume 2 - 4-37 Box Canyon Run of the River Project states: "Planned future run-of-river hydroelectric project with a capacity of 15 MW and proposed start of 2017". : "Habitat compensation is planned for Box Canyon Creek (possibly Marty and Cascara) in the form of rearing habitat for juvenile Coho salmon and cutthroat trout".

However, this project began operation earlier this year:
July 12, 2016 Clean-Tech Canada online publication: VANCOUVER—Elemental Energy Inc. has announced it has brought its 16 megawatt run-of-river Box Canyon hydroelectric project northeast of Vancouver fully online."

This project is downstream from the Box Canyon project and in the local study area. It does have environmental impacts, in particular noise. The effects on wildlife and fish resulting from and impacts on the residents at McNab must be taken into account.

From the Canadian Environment Assessment website Box Canyon project archived information it stated this project would impact fish but escaped an assessment when changes to the fisheries act came into effect:
" flow changes will be experienced within those tributary creeks as well as along approximately 5.7 kilometres of McNab Creek between the confluence with Cascara at the upstream end and Box Canyon Creek at the downstream end. In addition flow ramping effects will likely have an effect to the mouth of McNab Creek. All diverted water is proposed to be delivered to a single powerhouse located on the banks of McNab Creek, approximately one kilometre (1 km) upstream of the confluence of Box Canyon Creek.

….. In particular, Fisheries and Oceans Canada will pursue the assessment of impacts of the construction and operation of the proposed hydroelectric power facility on fish and fish habitat, and determine the required mitigation for impacts and compensation for residual impacts. Further details or changes to the scope will be posted if other Federal agencies and departments are required to provide input or issue an approval for any of the project components."

On July 6, 2012, the new Canadian Environmental Assessment Act, 2012 came into force which replaced the former Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. As a result, there is no longer a requirement to complete the environmental assessment of this project."

In May 2015 the Auditor General of BC issued a report with nine recommendations and stated "It's in the interest of British Columbians to address cumulative effects management without delay". Howe Sound was selected as the one of the Province's first regions for a Cumulative Effects Assessment under the new framework. It is appropriate that this project be an example for implementing the highest standards of care for our environment.

It is not clear that residual impacts of the Box Canyon Run of the River project have been appropriately considered. Considering the Box Canyon project is now operational, further study of the baseline assumptions should be conducted with special consideration to the impacts on fish.

Any of the results from the draft assessments available from Forests Lands and Natural Resource operations relevant to this project should be considered.

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

What research has Burnco done (in a thorough way) about the financial losses that can be expected by the proposed mine with respect to:
1) tourism
2) recreational boating
3) fish and fishing
4) health effects of residents
5) the loss of the McNabb estuary overall (the only one in Squamish Valley remaining that is relatively intact)
6) Financial loss of other existing gravel pits

There needs to be much more careful investigation before this gravel pit is approved.

Ruth Simons - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Air Quality: I am a former member of the Sea to Sky Clean Air Society. If I read the assessment correctly, very little onsite monitoring of baseline conditions has been conducted on site and collection of dust sample was done in the month of November. November would not be representative of the dust that could occur in the dry summer months. Why November?

The air quality data is based on 2013 information. Monitoring equipment at the stations has been upgraded. This upgraded equipment would likely affect the baseline data of the PM2.5 readings. The purpose of upgrading the equipment was to enable more accurate readings of air quality, why is it not being used in this assessment?

Logging trucks are often travelling through the project area and kick up considerable dust on the gravel road. There is intended to be an increase in trucks with the transportation of the silt collected by truck from the processing area, have the cumulative impacts been considered in the overall air quality predictions?

Marine Resources: I recall commenting during the draft phase about the concern of particulates escaping during barge loading and accumulating over the life of the project over the estuary and affecting the productive marine life. Air Quality section illustration 5.7-4 indicates coarse particulate matter over the estuary. There is shellfish in the project area, samples of crab were collected for the human health study and we have underwater film footage of scallops, crab and prawns not far from the barge loading area. The Consultant for Marine Resources explained there would be no value in a study due to material being "wet" and covered conveyors being used. Once the gravel is crushed and stored, what guaranteed it is still dust free when it is being loaded onto the barge during the hottest and driest time of the year with windy conditions? There doesn't seem to be a design for keeping the aggregate wet during barge loading.

What about the cumulative impacts of increased trucking activity on the road on the fish in Harlequin Creek that runs beside the road?

Darci Rosalie - Vancouver, British Columbia

Re: Burnco Aggregate Project

As a property owner in Howe Sound I am opposed to the Burnco mining project.

McNab Creek Estuary provides nutrient rich stream waters that fertilize the ocean and create rich and productive ecologies. It is a delicate ecosystem still recovering from past logging. Approval of the Burnco proposal will return the area to an industrial zone.

Despite Burnco's proposed mitigation measures, damage to this recovering ecosystem will be unavoidable.

Environmental Concerns:

  • Damage to salmon, herring and other marine life
  • Noise from gravel crushing affecting wild life
  • Disruption to the elk, an at risk species
  • Lighting during construction and operation causing further disruption to life in the area
  • Compromised air quality due to emissions
  • Increased barge traffic in Howe Sound
  • Overall damage to the estuary and surrounding area that comes with industrial development

Howe Sound has been returning to its natural beauty, creating tourism, recreational opportunities and vibrant communities. We have seen the return of dolphins and whales, indicators of ecological recovery. The Burnco Aggregate Project does not fit our values. Please say no to this project and preserve the delicate ecosystem of Howe Sound and its diverse local economies.

September 19, 2016

Victoria Smith - Gambier Island, British Columbia

As a property owner in Howe Sound I am opposed to the Burnco mining project. McNab Creek Estuary provides nutrient rich stream waters that fertilize the ocean and create rich and productive ecologies. It is a delicate ecosystem still recovering from past logging. Approval of the Burnco proposal will return the area to an industrial zone.

Despite Burnco's proposed mitigation measures, damage to this recovering ecosystem will be unavoidable.

Environmental Concerns:
Damage to salmon, herring and other marine life Noise from gravel crushing affecting wild life Disruption to the elk, an at risk species Lighting during construction and operation causing further disruption to life in the area Compromised air quality due to emissions Increased barge traffic in Howe Sound Overall damage to the estuary and surrounding area that comes with industrial development

Howe Sound has been returning to its natural beauty, creating tourism, recreational opportunities and vibrant communities. We have seen the return of dolphins and whales, indicators of ecological recovery. The Burnco Aggregate Project does not fit our values. Please say no to this project and preserve the delicate ecosystem of Howe Sound and its diverse local economies.

September 18, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Edmonton, British Columbia

I 100% support this project.

Ruth Simons - Howe Sound, British Columbia

I have been trying to access the website for the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency Burnco project information all day (Sunday 18th September) with no success. Various approaches to get to the information are unsuccessful, it appears the system is hung up or just not responding.

The comment period should be extended for those with limited time available, that have limited time to research and review the information.

The storyboards summarizing the project that were at the Burnco public information sessions are not posted to the Burnco website as promised. I was discouraged by Burnco staff from taking photos at the public information sessions with the understanding they would be available immediately after Sep 14th. Again, for those not able to make the open house sessions, this information should be transparent and available during the public comment period, especially during the weekends when people are more likely to have time to comment. Having read the story boards some of the comments are related to that content.

The public comment period ends September 28th, this should be extended to October 3rd to allow for an extra weekend to allow people the time to review all the information.

September 17, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Similar to letters sent to you and the BCEAO a few years ago we will continue to question the need for another large scale industrial mine within one of the magical areas of Howe Sound.

This is a place where silence and beauty is so spectacular that you can read a book while hearing only the occasional splash of a seal, the flapping of wings from a blue heron, and the crunching teeth a sea otter while eating his morning fish. This is all while mountains tower straight out of the ocean 3,000 - 5,000 feet in a 360 degree view. Kids paddle board in notoriously calm waters. There is recreational crabbing, prawning, fishing, and natural oysters beds, among many other forms of wildlife. You may think you are in Alaska but you are only 45 minutes from downtown Vancouver.

It seems no so long ago that the Howe Sound was so polluted that no one was even interested in enjoying the many wonders of this area. This is not the only area that has had a eye opener. Consider, the dump within the Whistler town center 40 years ago before it was really discovered. The logging dumps in Tofino and clear cutting in Clayoquot Sound, prior to it becoming a UNESCO biosphere or the recent success of the Sea to Sky Gondola in a town that has emerged from a rough industrial history. Even the shores of Vancouver were once filled with heavy industry and is now one of the most livable metropolitan areas in Canada. The beauty of McNab Valley is that it is slightly hard to get to without a boat. However, all the above examples were also once hard to get to. Access to this area will also change someday soon and the monetary value in marine resources and potential tourism dollars, will greatly exceed that of an aggregate mine.

The immense benefits this area offers with respect to both natural marine and terrestrial ecosystems is truly spectacular and I'm very disappointed to see new industrial applications being considered for this region. I understand that gravel is an important part of our lives but a mine of this nature would surely be better suited in other locations with a lower impact to both the ecosystem and tourism economy.

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

I understand that gravel is an important part of our lives but a mine of this nature would surely be better suited in other locations with a lower impact to both the ecosystem and tourism economy.

Other areas of concern are:

  • Apparently, there is no plan to have any monitoring mechanism in place from the noise from rock crushers reverberating off the mountains surrounding the site and the ocean
  • Should the effects on marine life, wildlife, fish etc. be negative (which is very likely) there are no repercussions or any way of turning this project around once it has been approved.
  • Burnco tries to play-down all the effects on the biodiversity and ecological value of the estuary and recovering Howe Sound..
  • Burnco is has a bad reputation for bullying government agencies, municipalities, parks, fisheries etc. Please don't let them boondoggle you.
  • There is no benefit to the local communities and clearly no interest from them to have this mine.
  • There has been and would continue to be a decline in property values and natural capital values within the region.
  • There will be many long term effects of indirect and direct jobs within the recreation building and tourism markets due to negative effects of the mine.
  • Cumulative impacts on wildlife from the new Run of the River project and ongoing logging in the McNab Valley has not been accounted for.
  • Once approved it is very likely that Burnco will continue to bully and apply for enhanced future expansion plans of the mine beyond 16 years (could double) and its current size (could double).
  • BURNCO has donated more than $200,000 to Liberals and NDP in BC – I wonder why. They are an Alberta based firm

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Over the past few years there has been so much opposition for this mine. With all this opposition why would it even be considered?? Below is a snapshot of who I have witnesses as being in disagreement:

  • The Suzuki Foundation
  • Environmental consulting firms
  • GeoTech firms
  • Marine biologists
  • BC Stream Keepers
  • Squamish First Nations
  • Tourism operators
  • Yacht Clubs and out-stations
  • Local municipalities and residents
  • Department of Fisheries
  • Local kids camps
  • Local recreation seekers
  • Local property owners
  • International tourists

Please recognize the economic, sociological and ecological value of this area and that it would do the province much more benefit to be left as a magical recreational area or designated as a National Park and or a UNESCO Biosphere

sandy mcnamee - White Rock, British Columbia

Howe Sound is the environmental jewel in the Vancouver crown. It is currently recovering from industrial use and is no place an aggregate mine. I have a degree in Biology and I know the teeming life that abounds and is supported by estuaries. Humans look at intertidal areas filled with grasses and mud and algae and imagine no importance. Mother Nature thrives in these areas. The newly introduced elk, the returning marine mammals, and hundreds of birds and fish and amphibians rely on this area to remain as it is. At some point people must realize that making money is not the most important thing on this earth, and to impact the earth so fully all in the name of corporate profits is beyond wrong and unreasonable. It is insane and ignorant. McNab Creek is a rare a beautiful part of Howe Sound and no place for a mine. Squamish is an up and coming recreational area for people to come and explore and enjoy the incredible outdoor experiences of Howe Sound. S o not only is mother nature at risk, tourism and enjoyment by residents is at risk too. One last thing is the huge impact on the creek itself. It is a fish bearing creek, that would suffer irreparable harm.

Ava - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Please do not destroy Howe Sound with a gravel pit.

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Gambier is a beautiful island where lots of family's and friends go to vacation and enjoy the beautiful place. My friends have a cabin over there that they alway invite people up and everyone who goes always comes home saying how much fun it was and how beautiful gambier truly is. Why ruin all of this for a gravel pit that will only create 12 jobs? Don't take away this beautiful place full of memories and homes for a mine project.

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Ron Slade - Gabriola Island, British Columbia

I support this project.

Richard Boates - Delta, British Columbia

The construction indcusty is one of the pillars of the BC economy and employs many thousands of British Colombians. it is also critical to the development of our province. A secure supply of aggregates is critical to the construction industry and will contribute to the prosperity of our province. This aggregate mine is responsible development and must be allowed to proceed for the good of all British Colombians.

September 16, 2016

Chris Dietrich - North Vancouver, British Columbia

I just graduated from high school and I feel like my childhood playground (the Howe Sound area) is at risk of being permanently damaged. This is a place that should be meant for rest and relaxation, not for industrialization. The sound of crushing rock does not fit in with this beautiful spot. Please consider the negative impact this gravel mine will have on the environment.

Barry johnson - Mission, British Columbia

I believe we must have it to keep up to the growing demand of our economy to sub stain jobs and demands to all of Canada

Personal Information Withheld - Langley, British Columbia

Having reviewed the work and effort done to make this an environmentally responsible project I am in favor of proceeding with this proposal by Burnco. This project will benefit those who live in BC

Drew Vitcoe - Mission, British Columbia

I support this project. We need the good paying jobs and the tax revenue.

David sverre - Gibsons, British Columbia

I am an civil engineer and having read the project documentation I believe this is a very sensible and low impact location and approach to obtain aggregates.

Pierre Blais - Vancouver, British Columbia

It should move forward, we need to keep our economy growing...I fully support this project.

Neil McClelland - Nanaimo, British Columbia

I'm writing to voice my strong opposition to a large scale gravel mine that Burnco Rock Products Ltd. proposes for McNab Creek on the Sunshine Coast in Howe Sound.

I am a member of Thunderbird Yacht Club and our only wholly owned set of docks are located directly opposite the proposed site and on the north shore of Gambier Island. We are a group of 115 members and families who motor or sail to Ekins Point from marinas located all over the lower mainland. We have spent many thousands of dollars and countless months building a club that continues to attract new members with the attrition of our original members. It is likely the peace and beauty of this location that remains our strongest marketing tool: remote and yet only 30 minutes - 2 hours travel away from our local marinas.

Please decline Burnco's request for a mining permit for McNab Creek.

I live in Nanaimo but visit our Ekins Pt outstation as often as I can.

My specific concerns about a mine in this location are: Noise, lights at night and waves. In short, everything that we enjoy at our outstation, which is now at risk.

The economic gain belongs solely to Burnco, while it destroys our peace and enjoyment of this spectacular vista: a dust/smoke/lights-at-night eyesore that will be visible greatly reduces our ability to attract new members. This project brings no economic or social advantage to our club, nor to anyone else trying to enjoy the natural beauty of our west coast. This project disregards the benefits to the province of having such a truly magnificent area like Howe Sound in our own back yard.

Noise reverberates off the mountains surrounding this site. Although the Burnco plan includes a berm, it remains uncertain that berms offer much mitigation to sound over water. Although Burnco's application indicates that noise would be as loud as a 'fridge running', it is precisely this type of 'white' urban noise, and machine/industrial noise that we seek out this area for it's current peace and silence. The Canadian media reported this week of the findings of industrial noise that negatively affect sea mammal populations in the St. Lawrence River. Howe Sound has recently enjoyed the return of Orcas, dolphins and an occasional grey whale. These sightings are considered priceless by our club.

Our members use the foreshore area/estuary (the sole estuary in the area) of McNabb Creek for recreation of fishing, prawning and crabbing. Not only will a mine and it's accompanying marine traffic greatly diminish the marine life populations that support fishing, the risk to our small dinghies/boats from the increased tug/barge and water taxi traffic exists as another consideration that could diminish our interest in returning to this area.

We have found over our four decades at our docks that water taxis and commercial tug/barge traffic produce wakes large enough to cause damage both in short term and over time. Boats that are moored without adequately-placed protection from their fenders are pounded against our docks. We have experienced wakes hitting our docks from boats passing (at all speeds) that have knocked members off their feet. This has required nearly yearly repair and maintenance of the docks. Burnco's application indicates that there are no expected adverse effects from the wakes of increased traffic of water taxis and tug boats. Bullshit . . . pardon my French! We know unequivocally this statement to be untrue: not only for our docks but for all docks and the foreshore of Thornbrough and Ramilies Channel. Boat owners will be unwilling to anchor in the beach/foreshore area directly in front of the proposed site due to the risk of damage from the high wakes of the expected and freque nt water taxis.

The wakes of commercial vessels listed above also present risks to kayakers, paddle-boarders, swimmers, water-skiers. Many of our children have learned to swim at this dock. We feel that our safety on the water could be compromised.

In 2012, we determined that Thunderbird Yacht Club spent over $161, 000 in Gibsons and Pender Harbour on fuel, groceries, restaurants, etc. This amount can only have increased since that time. If our membership or our interest in Howe Sound is diminished, the business that we bring to the Sunshine Coast could be similarly lessened.

Calgary-based Burnco Rock Products donated $34,000 to the Liberals, bringing their eight year running total to $219,700. Writes Dermod Travis, executive director of Integrity BC, 23 April2014. This amount is considered by the author to be 'outlandish'. At this time $286,700.00 has been donated by Burnco to the BC Liberal Government. One can only wonder why Burnco would donate such a large amount to the current government.

The McNab Creek estuary remains both rare and productive. It is a living breathing science project directly opposite our docks and we use this remote and pristine area to educate our children/grandchildren the value of conservation for their children's enjoyment.

Our member's grandchildren saw whales /dolphins/deer/otters this past summer in Howe Sound opposite McNabb Creek. This experience outside of their usual city life was priceless and unforgettable. What is the dollar value placed on a child (or any adult for that matter) seeing a whale for the first time?

My family and I watched meteor showers this summer from our boat in Howe Sound: it was a priceless experience. Lights from a gravel mine will almost certainly diminish the night sky. We value this remote area precisely for such advantages as an unobstructed night sky.

Burnco executives will not commit to complete this project in 16 years: they have been quoted as intending to maximizing this resource. It remains uncertain if Burnco will wish to extend beyond 16 years.

At this time, we are unaware of a commitment from Burnco to provide a public forum with which we might monitor and assess compliance to Burnco's original plan.

Burnco's reputation as a neighbour in Alberta is known to be adversarial. Citizens of Cougar Ridge have learned, following 10 years of Burnco as their neighbour, that Burnco does not adhere to it's original commitment as they fully understand the limited power within local governments to enforce them to comply.

Can you honestly say that there are effective recourses in place to ensure that Burnco can be held accountable for its claims?

Again we encourage you to decline Burnco's application: their profit isn't worth the ill will that this project brings to Howe Sound.

Thank you for your serious consideration to the concerns of our members.

September 15, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

Mr. David Rafael
Senior Planner, SCRD.
Mr. Ian Winn,
Director, SCRD
Ms Kate-Louise Stamford,
Islands Trust
Ian.Winn@SCRD.CA
KStamford@IslandsTrust.bc.ca

I'm writing to voice my opposition to a large scale gravel mine that Burnco Rock Products Ltd. proposes for McNab Creek on the Sunshine Coast in Howe Sound.Thunderbird Yacht Club's sole set of docks are located directly opposite the proposed site and on the north shore of Gambier Island. We are a group of 115 members and families who motor or sail to Ekins Point from marinas located all over the lower mainland. . We have spent many thousands of dollars and countless months building a club that continues to attract new members with the attrition of our original members. It is likely the peace and beauty of this location that remains our strongest marketing tool: remote and yet only 30 minutes - 2 hours travel away from our local marinas.

Please decline Burnco's request for a mining permit for McNab Creek.

I live in Squamish and am a past Commodore of the Thunderbird Yacht Club

My specific concerns about a mine in this location are:

The socioeconomic benefit for the mine is marginal for the area with the potential to have a negative outcome if boaters such as myself find the quiet enjoyment ruined and take our business elsewhere.

  • The economic gain belongs solely to Burnco, while it destroys our peace and enjoyment of this spectacular vista: a dust/smoke/lights-at- night eyesore that will be visible greatly reduces our ability to attract new members. This project brings no economic or social advantage to our club.
  • Noise reverberates off the mountains surrounding this site. Although the Burnco plan includes a berm, it remains uncertain that berms offer much mitigation to sound over water. Although Burnco's application indicates that noise would be as loud as a 'fridge running', it is precisely this type of 'white' urban noise, and machine/industrial noise that we seek out this area for it's current peace and silence. The Canadian media reported this week of the findings of industrial noise that negatively affect sea mammal populations in the St. Lawrence River. Howe Sound has recently enjoyed the return of Orcas, dolphins and an occasional grey whale. These sightings are considered priceless by our club.
  • Our club is concerned that the dust and the possibility of harmful airborne chemicals released during the processing of aggregate may evolve as a health issue for children and for those with compromised respiratory systems.
  • Our members use the foreshore area/estuary (the sole estuary in the area) of McNabb Creek for recreation of fishing, prawning and crabbing. Not only will a mine and it's accompanying marine traffic greatly diminish the marine life populations that support fishing, the risk to our small dingies/boats from the increased tug/barge and water taxi traffic exists as another consideration that could diminish our interest in returning to this area.
  • We have found over our 4 decades at our docks that water taxis and commercial tug/barge traffic produce wakes large enough to cause damage both in short term and over time. Boats that are moored without adequately-placed protection from their fenders are pounded against our docks. We have experienced wakes hitting our docks from boats passing (at all speeds) that have knocked members off their feet. This has required nearly yearly repair and maintenance of the docks. Burnco's application indicates that there is no expected adverse effects from the wakes of increased traffic of water taxis and tug boats. We know unequivocally this statement to be untrue: not only for our docks but for all docks and the foreshore of Thornbrough and Ramilies Channel. Boat owners will be unwilling to anchor in the beach/foreshore area directly in front of the proposed site due to the risk of damage from the high wakes of the expected and frequent water taxis.
  • The wakes of commercial vessels listed above also present risks to kayakers, paddle-boarders, swimmers, water-skiers. Many of our children have learned to swim at this dock. We feel that our safety on the water could be compromised.
  • In 2012, we determined that Thunderbird Yacht Club spent $161, 054.00 in Gibsons and Pender Harbour on fuel, groceries, restaurants, etc. This amount can only have increased since that time. If our membership or our interest in Howe Sound is diminished, the business that we bring to the Sunshine Coast could be similarly lessened.
  • Calgary-based Burnco Rock Products donated $34,000 to the Liberals, bringing their eight year running total to $219,700. Writes Dermod Travis, executive director of Integrity BC, 23 April 2014. This amount is considered by the author to be 'outlandish'. At this time $286,700.00 has been donated by Burnco to the BC Liberal Government. Please refer to the attached file.
    One can only wonder why Burnco would donate such a large amount to the current government.
  • The McNab Creek estuary remains both rare and productive. It is a living breathing science project directly opposite our docks and we use this remote and pristine area to educate our children/grandchildren the value of conservation for their children's enjoyment.
  • My grandchildren saw whales /dolphins/deer/otters this past summer in Howe Sound opposite McNabb Creek. . This experience outside of their usual city life was priceless and unforgettable.
    What is the dollar value placed on a child (or any adult for that matter) seeing a whale for the first time?
  • My family and I watched meteor showers this summer from our boat in Howe Sound: it was a priceless experience. Lights from a gravel mine will almost certainly diminish the night sky.
    We value this remote area precisely for such advantages as an unobstructed night sky.
  • Burnco executives will not commit to complete this project in 16 years: they have been quoted as intending to maximizing this resource. It remains uncertain if Burnco will wish to extend beyond 16 years.
  • At this time, we are unaware of a commitment from Burnco to provide a public forum with which we might monitor and assess compliance to Burnco's original plan.
  • Burnco's reputation as a neighbour in Alberta is known to be adversarial. Citizens of Cougar Ridge have learned, following 10 years of Burnco as their neighbour, that Burnco does not adhere to it's original commitment as they fully understand the limited power within local governments to enforce them to comply.

Again we encourage you to decline Burnco's application: their profit isn't worth the ill will that this project brings to Howe Sound.

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

Gravel is not worth the impact a crushing plant will have on the wildlife habitat and human enjoyment of one of the most beautiful sounds in the province.

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

I am writing to oppose the proposed development. I have boated, kayaked and hiked the McNab area for many years. Current logging puts a temporary dent in accessibility but it it seasonal and goes away. The logging noise is clearly audible and disrupting our peace and quiet enjoyment. I find Burnco's statement that at most I will have to put up with the noise of a fridge an understatement of the situation. The logging machines echo across the sound and the proposed 24h rock crushing operation will be the end of my quiet recuperation on the water at McNab.

The new kayak campsites the province installed are wonderful but one is just outside McNab and who would want to camp with rock crushing noise ruling the night? Or contend with barges and comuter traffic from Burnco? The northern sound is a gem of a recreation paradise for us from Vancouver with orcas, seals, salmon, crabs and the occasional gray whale visiting. The provice is just finishing the Britannia clean up and the return of wildlife and pristine water is a spetaculare sucess. Why endanger this for a little bit of grave? I think its a bad trade off. Please do not approve this development.

In the interet of disclusure, I am not againse development as a whole. I support the Kinder Morgan pipeline, the trans mountain (with apprptiate investments in safety), site C and the liquiofied gas facility up near squamish. We need development to keep BC prosperous and many developments justify a trade off. A hand full of jobs and a faciity blocking access to the only level ground acess in the norther Howe Sound does not meet my cost benefit threshold.

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Page 1 of the Executive Summary under Project Description has a major omission. A significant component of this project is the onsite crushing of the materials dredged. Crushing equipment and the process generates significant noise and impacts the zoning of this property. This section makes no mention of the crushing and should be corrected. Omitting rock crushing from the description of the project misleads the reader by attempting to minimize the impact.

"Because there is a relatively shallow water table in this area, once the site has been cleared the aggregate resource will be extracted using a clamshell dredge mounted on a floating barge. Aggregate materials will be conveyed to a processing area where sand and gravel products will be stockpiled (Figures 2 and 3). A high efficiency wash plant will use 95% recycled washwater; fines and silt will be removed from the process water for on-site disposal and reclamation. No wash water will be discharged.

The processed aggregate material will be conveyed to barges for shipment to BURNCO's existing facilities in Burnaby or Langley (Figure 4).

Pierre GRUGET - West Vancouver, British Columbia

In which city can you see a group of 50 elks in pure wilderness? In Vancouver. 35 km from downtown...

One morning we were there and saw them, 20 m from us - beautiful. Unique! Wild! And that treasure? At our door.

Our grand children will love Vancouver because of that or ... maybe not, depending of what we are going to choose...

Another day we saw many salmons jumping out of the water. I would have loved to understand deeply why so many salmons were there? Sure it was because that place is unique for them.

An you want to destroy that for sand and gravel you can find everywhere. Why? Laziness? Pleasure to destroy what is unique? Or just because bears elks salmons and other animals don't know how to complain for excessive noise and dust in front of the judge? Sure it cost a little more money to avoid dust and noise...

In image and sounds it is:
replacing that https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=orSIhYAI3VI
by that https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ch-Y2p-h7Eg
Which one do you prefer?

Please, please don't do that. And protect by law the aera.

Gabrielle Senoner - West Vancouver, British Columbia

I Gabrielle Senoner resident of West Vancouver , object to the proposed Burnco Aggregate Mine Project as it Is harmful and it affects the north shore West and other sorrounding areas in a very devastating scale at the long term . It will affect our quality of life polluting possibly the water and the land. Mining must not be tolerated for the sake of the economy . There must be other ways to help it by not damaging our environment and future generations.

September, 14, 2016

Stephen Zimmerman - McNabb Creek, British Columbia

Flood prevention dike is not pictured currently. As of July 15 there is hundreds of fallen trees into the creek from wind drawn. This section of creek now has sun 8 hours a day. When 15years ago it had shade. Giving less then favourable readings.This gives me less confidence in the temperature readings in the environment assessment. Send from info session at glen eagle community centre

Josef Loew - Vancouver, British Columbia

Burnco Application process: McNab Creek Gravel pit

I'm writing to voice my opposition to a large scale gravel mine that Burnco Rock Products Ltd. proposes for McNab Creek on the Sunshine Coast in Howe Sound.

Thunderbird Yacht Club's docks are located directly opposite the proposed site and on the north shore of Gambier Island. We are a group of 115 members and families who motor or sail to Ekins Point from marinas located all over the lower mainland. Our club has spent 40 years building and maintaining 2 docks that can handle > 70 boats of all sizes at any given time. We have spent many tens of thousands of dollars and countless months building a club that continues to attract new members with the attrition of our original members. The peace and beauty of this location is our strongest marketing tool: remote and yet only 30 minutes - 2 hours travel away from our local marinas.

My specific concerns about a mine in this location are:
The economic gain belongs solely to Burnco, while it destroys our peace and enjoyment of this spectacular vista. I understand and respect Burnco's work to maximize shareholder value. I am a fan of capitalism. They bought the place on spec and once it is re-zoned they will have made a fortune. But sometimes you lose and this project will put a stopper in developing north Howe Sound into the recreational paradise it should be. Please put the peoples' interest first in this instance. It will send a message that the Liberal government is not just bought. (Calgary-based Burnco Rock Products donated $34,000 to the Liberals, bringing their eight year running total to $219,700. Writes Dermod Travis, executive director of Integrity BC, 23 April 2014. I consider this amount 'outlandish'. At this time $286,700.00 has been donated by Burnco to the BC Liberal Government.)

The Province recently installed a series of camp sites in the sound to improve access for kayak tours. I visited Bain Creek last weekend. A wonderful development of the west coast's southern-most sound. It can be developed into a spectacular wilderness recreation area just an hour from Vancouver. I had friends from Europe up and they could not believe what we have in our backyard. They have to fly to Norway to see anything even close to Howe Sound. My niece saw orcas and dolphins this past summer in Howe Sound opposite McNabb Creek. We caught crabs and prawns. The orcas and prawns are just coming back after Britannia has been cleaned up. Why chase them out again for a little bit of gravel?

Noise reverberates off the mountains surrounding this site. I spent last week end there and the current logging operation was running a backhoe way back in the property. The noise was focused by the valley, like in an ancient roman amphitheatre, and really disrupted the peace of the area. Although the Burnco plan includes a berm, I can now testify that berms offer little mitigation to sound over water. You still have a point-source of noise that the natural amphitheatre created by the valley will amplify with great efficiency. (I have a Master Degree in Engineering Physics and am confident that the scientists on the review team will agree.) Burnco's application indicates that noise would be as loud as a 'fridge running' this simply is not true--and you are welcome to come out to the club to verify this. It is precisely this type of 'white' urban noise we seek get away from at Ekins Point. The Canadian media reported this week of the findings of industrial n oise that negatively affect sea mammal populations in the St. Lawrence River. Howe Sound has recently enjoyed the return of Orcas, dolphins and an occasional grey whale. These sightings are considered priceless by our club.

While I was at the dock, a large crew transported roared up the far shore close to McNab. The wake took a while to arrive but the east dock rocked so hard that the old man walking on if had go down to his knees to avoid being thrown down. I wish I had a video ready. It was a scary how the docks rolled. We have found over our 4 decades at our docks that water taxis and commercial tug/barge traffic produce wakes large enough to cause damage both in short term and over time. Boats are pounded against our docks. We have experienced wakes hitting our docks from boats passing (at all speeds) that have knocked members off their feet. This has required nearly yearly repair and maintenance of the docks. Burnco's application indicates that there is no expected adverse effects from the wakes of increased traffic of water taxis and tug boats. We know unequivocally this statement to be untrue: not only for our docks but for all docks and the foreshore of Thornbrough and Ramilies Channel. Boat owners will be unwilling to anchor in the beach/foreshore area directly in front of the proposed site due to the risk of damage from the high wakes of the expected and frequent water taxis.

Mark Edmonds - Bowen Island, British Columbia

I wholeheartedly disagree with the Burnco Agrregrate Project.

The damage to the only, largely unspoilt, major estuary in Howe Sound is unacceptable- especially at a time when Howe Sound is finally recovering from decades of abuse. That recovery coming from many hours of professional and volunteer work and a significant amount of taxpayer dollars.

I ask the province to reject this proposal.

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

12 jobs and the profit of 1 company does not justify the destruction of an area that provides the opportunity to generate more jobs in an industry that is consistent with the brand and reputation of British Columbia...such as tourism and/or real estate development and/or something else that benefits from extraordinary nature. The scope of thinking on this appears to be very narrow and extremely short-sighted. I do not believe this project is to the benefit of the region or any BC tax payer. There are better options for the region.

Personal Information Withheld - Furry Creek, British Columbia

13 Sept. 2016

Burnco Application process: McNab Creek Gravel pit

Mr. David Rafael, Senior Planner, SCRD. Mr. Ian Winn, Director, SCRD Ms Kate-Louise Stamford, Islands Trust

I'm writing to voice my opposition to a large scale gravel mine that Burnco Rock Products Ltd. proposes for McNab Creek on the Sunshine Coast in Howe Sound.

I am a member of Thunderbird Yacht Club whose docks are located directly opposite the proposed site and on the north shore of Gambier Island. We are a group of 115 members and families who motor or sail to Ekins Point from marinas located all over the lower mainland. Our club has spent 40 years building and maintaining 2 docks that can handle > 70 boats of all sizes at any given time.

We have spent many tens of thousands of dollars and countless months building a club that continues to attract new members with the attrition of our original members. The peace and beauty of this location is our strongest marketing tool: remote and yet only 30 minutes - 2 hours travel away from our local marinas.

My specific concerns about a mine in this location are as follows:

  1. The economic gain belongs solely to Burnco, while it destroys our peace and enjoyment of this spectacular vista.
  2. Further white noise and
  3. wakes are major concerns.

Howe Sound was "dead" for years and now since the closures of Woodfibre and Britannia Mines and cleanup, the herring are back in the sound, increasing salmon populations as well as dolphins and orcas.

Further the Province recently installed a series of camp sites in the sound to improve access for kayak tours all of which want peace and tranquility not urban white noise. It is precisely this type of 'white' urban noise we seek get away from at Ekins Point.

Further, the Canadian media reported this week of the findings of industrial noise that negatively affect sea mammal populations in the St. Lawrence River.

Water wakes are also a major concern.. We have found over our 4 decades at our docks that water taxis and commercial tug/barge traffic produce wakes large enough to cause damage both in short term and over time. This has required nearly yearly repair and maintenance of the docks. Burnco's application indicates that there is no expected adverse effects from the wakes of increased traffic of water taxis and tug boats. We know unequivocally this statement to be untrue: not only for our docks but for all docks and the foreshore of Thornbrough and Ramilies Channel. Boat owners will be unwilling to anchor in the beach/foreshore area directly in front of the proposed site due to the risk of damage from the high wakes of the expected and frequent water taxis. Further , and as an owner at Olivers Landing in Furry Creek, spit erosion from wakes and tides has caused foreshore erosion which Squamish District is aware of since 2010 and ongoing discussions are trying to resolve a solution to present problem.

Again we encourage you to decline Burnco's application---why do we want to regress back creating again to a "dead" Howe Sound environment. Resonating "white" noise not only affects us but even more importantly, the orcas and dolphins who have come back to our sound. We agree pollution this time is different than chemicals, but one still has to understand it is a form of pollution to our fish habitats.

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Why can't the government accept that there has been widespread concern for this project and so many other benefits to using this land as a recreational jewel.

Below is a snapshot of who is in opposition to this mine going ahead:

  • The Suzuki Foundation
  • Environmental consulting firms
  • GeoTech firms
  • Marine biologists
  • BC Stream Keepers
  • Squamish First Nations
  • Tourism operators
  • Yacht Clubs and out-stations
  • Local municipalities and residents
  • Department of Fisheries
  • Local kids camps
  • Local recreation seekers
  • Local property owners
  • International tourists

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

The Future of Howe Sound has been getting support from many parties that all agree that a mine of this nature is a bad idea. Below is a snapshot of who is on our side, but we need your individual voice as well.

  • The Suzuki Foundation
  • Environmental consulting firms
  • GeoTech firms
  • Marine biologists
  • BC Stream Keepers
  • Squamish First Nations
  • Tourism operators
  • Yacht Clubs and out-stations
  • Local municipalities and residents
  • Department of Fisheries
  • Local kids camps
  • Local recreation seekers
  • Local property owners
  • International tourists

The ecological value of this area is so unique that there have also been applications and proposals for large parts of the Howe Sounds to be designated as a National Park and or a UNESCO Biosphere… or ironically more industrial land!? Please make the right decision.

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

The protection of Howe Sound's remarkable recovery after decades of industrial abuse is my top concern.

Other concerns are:

  • Noise from rock crushers reverberating off the mountains surrounding the site and the ocean. This area is valued for its peace and quiet and majestic beauty. Apparently, there is no plan to have any monitoring mechanism in place.
  • Should the effects on marine life, wildlife, fish etc. be negative (which is very likely) there are no repercussions or any way of turning this project around once it has been approved.
  • Burnco tries to play-down all the effects on the biodiversity and ecological value of the estuary and recovering Howe Sound.
  • Rezoning the property from current rural to industrial use. The general public clearly does not want this more industry in Howe Sound.
  • No benefit to the local community and no appreciation for Howe Sound unique biosphere and beauty, only loss of a spectacular valley just 30 minutes from Horseshoe Bay.
  • There has been and would continue to be a decline in property values and natural capital values within the region.
  • There will be many long term effects of indirect and direct jobs within the recreation building and tourism markets due to negative effects of the mine.
  • Cumulative impacts on wildlife from the new Run of the River project and ongoing logging in the McNab Valley has not been accounted for.
  • Once approved, we all know that they will apply for enhanced future expansion plans of the mine beyond 16 years (could double) and its current size (could double).

Don Ogden - Vancouver, British Columbia

I'm writing to voice my opposition to a large scale gravel mine that Burnco Rock Products Ltd. proposes for McNab Creek on the Sunshine Coast in Howe Sound.Thunderbird Yacht Club's sole set of docks are located directly opposite the proposed site and on the north shore of Gambier Island. We are a group of 115 members and families who motor or sail to Ekins Point from marinas located all over the lower mainland. . We have spent many thousands of dollars and countless months building a club that continues to attract new members with the attrition of our original members. It is likely the peace and beauty of this location that remains our strongest marketing tool: remote and yet only 30 minutes - 2 hours travel away from our local marinas.

Please decline Burnco's request for a mining permit for McNab Creek.

Personal Information Withheld - Fort St. John, British Columbia

More jobs and positive devlopment are good for this province.

Tanis Layzell - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Please do not put the gravel pit in Howe Sound. Years of clean up have been done and finally the whales and dolphens are back to Howe Sound. Humans need a tranquile environment as well to get back to nature. Dept. of Fisheries has turned it down 2X.

Please get the message that the majority of the people don't want it. Don't make a mess of Howe Sound.

September 13, 2016

Frank Rytir - North Vancouver, British Columbia

I AM STONGLY OPPOSED TO THIS PROJECT AS IT IS LAST CENTURY CLOUSE TO VANCOUVER FOR PEOPLE TO ANJOY

C Bradbury - Lions Bay, British Columbia

As a resident of Howe Sound I THOROUGHLY OBJECT to the proposed Burnco Gravel Mine for many reasons including the following:-

  1. the number of permanent full time job opportunities are too few to warrant such environmental destruction.
  2. as an area of outstanding natural beauty on the doorstep of a ever growing metropolis, this area should be left for the people to enjoy and not or private financial gain.
  3. natural, indigenous wildlife is slowly but defiantly returning to the once inhospitable Howe Sound, as a generation trying to look forward to a future where we work with the land and not destroy it and everything that depends upon it, this application should have been denied a long time ago.

Kristin Leahy Plant - North Vancouver, British Columbia

To whom it may concern,

I am writing to voice my/our strong opposition to the large scale gravel mine that Burnco Rock Products Ltd. is proposing for McNab Creek in Howe Sound.

Howe Sound has had a history of industrial activity and been victim to the effects of mining, pulp and paper, etc for many years. Fortunately it now appears that the Sound is revitalizing, becoming cleaner, and attracting the return of numerous kinds of wildlife. That together with its world class scenery contributes even further to its attraction, and adds a major asset to Vancouver, its residents and our tourist industry.

The McNab Creek estuary remains both rare and productive. It is a living breathing science project directly opposite our docks and we use this remote and pristine area to educate our children/grandchildren the value of conservation for their children's enjoyment. As well as the wakes of commercial vessels listed above also present risks to kayakers, paddle-boarders, swimmers, water-skiers. Many of our children have learned to swim at this dock, and we feel that our safety on the water could be compromised.

To take a retrograde step and allow an Alberta based company to set up a crushing/gravel pit in this location is both alarming and questionable at best.

Gravel pits by their very nature embody noise, airborne pollution and in this instance may have impact on the ocean due to its proximity. I believe there is gravel available to concrete manufacturers elsewhere and this proposed pit allows a relative newcomer to compete with the current players already in this field.

Why should we as British Columbians allow an impact of this nature to our precious environment so close to Vancouver by an Albertan company and for the sake of only twelve jobs!

We believe an approval of this application would be complete lack of foresight.

In summary this is a small business opportunity with the potential for considerable environmental impact and yet with zero upside for both residents and visitors to the Lower Mainland and the Sunshine Coast .

Again we encourage you to decline Burnco's application: their profit isn't worth the ill will that this project brings to Howe Sound

Yours truly

Mrs. Kristin Leahy Plant
North Vancouver, BC

September 12, 2016

Jack cooley - Brackindale, British Columbia

Minimum to zero change to existing estuary. After the project is finished connect the ocean to the lake.

Janice Wilson - North Vancouver, British Columbia

I feel this project will impact fish and other marine life in the area. It will devalue the estuary and increase industrial boat traffic. Howe Sound's water quality and marine life have been making good progress since Brittania was cleaned up and this will be a step backward. Also, the area has great value for recreational boaters as it is so close to Metro Vancouver, and a new marine trail has been established. Surely McNabb Creek could be incorporated as a recreational destination rather than a gravel pit.

Personal Information Withheld - Whistler, British Columbia

No to industrial development in the Howe Sound. This area is the prime tourism destination in BC and creates millions in tax revenue each and every day. The view from the new Sea to Sky Gondola will be of an industrial plant. How does that make any sense? Let's work to develop tourism further and not fund more short sighted projects that have no use in a future fossil fuel free world.

Personal Information Withheld - Burnaby, British Columbia

This project should be abandoned. It does not provide jobs, and further destroys the environment.

September 11, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Langley, British Columbia

I am strongly opposed to the Burnco aggregate project in Howe Sound Visually the valley will be destroyed forevermore The constant noise will make the surrounding area untenable for recreational use Noise travels well across a body of water and will impact all within earshot This site is too close to existing users of upper Howe Sound

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

I do not support the application based upon the fact that the success or failure of risk mitigation cannot be uneqivocally confirmed in advance and, given the only recent ecological recovery of Howe Sound, any degree of potential risk is simply too much. In the past 10 years, the Howe Sound recovery has been remarkable. From personally witnessing the first sighting of humpback in decades, to now watching orcas regularly cruise the Ramilles and Montague channels and seeing dolphin even just today, there is no amount of risk that is acceptable when considering any possible jeopardy to the natural habitat or, worse yet, any resumption of a damaged and dying ecosystem. We cannot move backwards when we have come so far.

Personal Information Withheld - Horseshoe Bay, British Columbia

There is only so much nature to go around, and precious little near major population centres. BC has a lot of resources. Excavate someplace further from society and preserve our peace and natural near-urban spaces.

Jim Noon - Halfmoon Bay, British Columbia

This is copied from the application.

"BURNCO proposes to develop its own aggregate source much closer to its existing ready-mix concrete plants in the Lower Mainland. A closer supply of sand and gravel to the Lower Mainland, with reduced transportation costs, will provide more sustainable environmental options to facilitate future viable business growth. The Proponent's three other divisions (i.e., concrete, aggregate and landscape) require access to an aggregate resource to meet projected demands in the BC marketplace. Development of the Proposed Project will result in up to a 280 km one-way reduction in tug and barge tow distance from the current furthest aggregate source (i.e., Port McNeil) to the Proponent's Lower Mainland operations."

The LeHigh operation in Sechelt is equidistant from the Lower Mainland. The proponent can continue to source product from Sechelt for many years to come.

This project is not a 'more sustainable environmental option.' It's not much more than an opportunity for the proponent to maximize profits.

This project is not required and will be a detriment to Howe Sound and nearby residents.

I do not support this project.

September 10, 2016

Gerry Prins - West Vancouver, British Columbia

It's time to stop restriction of trade and opposition to marketing Canada's resources.

Get on with it, the jobs are needed and it's a product that can be value-added right on the lower mainland.

When the area is mined out the locals will have a beautiful fresh water lake on their doorstep.

This company is jumping through every hoop to satisfy all concerned

j king - Nanaimo, British Columbia

another poison pusher for dollars....when are they going to learn you can not drink or breathe money

Robin Spano - Lions Bay, British Columbia

Concerned about salmon populations. The mine is due to disrupt an important estuary where salmon, and I believe also herring, spawn

I also oppose the project as a resident of the area who has seen major rejuvenation of marine wildlife in recent years. Gravel isn't an import or rare enough commodity to risk disturbing this amazing habitat for sea life, including but not limited to orcas, dolphins, and the glass sponge reef.

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

This will devastate Howe Sound and all the animals and water life in the area. It would be bad for tourism and have a long terms impact for generations to come, creating an ecological barren area. No to a gravel pit. BC and Howe Sound deserve better.

September 9, 2016

Cynthia Simonis - Delta, British Columbia

I oppose this application. The environment needs attention but not from these types of companies that wish to exploit the land.

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

As a local SCUBA diver, biologist, and recreational boater in Howe Sound, I do not approve of this project. Howe Sound has finally started to recover since the clean up of Britannia Mine. Marine and terrestrial life in Howe Sound is at major risk from these plans which would divert three creeks, create lots of noise, as well as waste. I do not endorse this project and I believe it is a terrible idea to move forward with this decision without serious consultation with Fisheries and Oceans Canada on it's impacts on all wildlife that live in or visit Howe Sound. As a person who enjoys Howe Sound for its natural beauty and serene quiet, I also disapprove of putting in a large eyesore that creates lots of noise, and frightens and keeps the marine life and wildlife I go to enjoy away. There is no benefit to those who are residing near the mine, there are no benefits to those who come to enjoy the area for recreation, and there will be horrible ecological and biolog ical consequences to Howe Sound.

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

What steps are being done to protect the McNab coastal Grizzly Bear?

The coastal grizzly bear is a subspecies still found in rural areas of the Sunshine Coast - almost extinct and in need of preservation.

Hunters and local residents at McNab have seen grizzlies in the area. What documentation has Burnco done to acknowledge the existence of these bears in the area?

September 8, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

Do not want another open pit mine in the area Leave the land alone

Sarah Valentine - Pemberton, British Columbia

Our poor Howe Sound finally got cleaned up after years of sledge dumping from the pulp mill and trailings from the copper mine only to be threatened with natural gas transfer and now an aggregate processing plant! It is time for the locals of the area, not out of Province, to have their voices heard. It is time to think about our precious environment for its own sake instead of the sake of the dollar! It is 2016 for golly's sake!

BURNCO Rock Products of Alberta wants to dig a 74+ acre pit, build an onsite crushing and processing plant, and produce 20+ million tonnes of aggregate over 16 + years. The project will create only 12 direct operational jobs and faces widespread community opposition, despite which the company continues to pursue the development.

Jay Snow - West Vancouver, British Columbia

We are just seeing salmon and whales back in the sound . What effect will this mine have on the fish and whale environment ?

Personal Information Withheld - Ekins Point, British Columbia

I am strongly opposed to the proposed McNab Creek gravel mine. I am a resident of North Vancouver and have been a member of Burrard Yacht Club for more than 10 years and have been enjoying our Ekins Point outstation for that time. This area of Howe Sound has high recreational value and is a wonderful escape from Vancouver within a few hours boat travel. The area is already the subject of industrial development to its detriment. The addition of the noise and visual impact of a gravel mine would degrade the recreational value of the area.

September 7, 2016

Dr. Hugh Freeman - Bowen Island, British Columbia

To whom it may concern,

Howe Sound and environs should be developed into a marine preservation sanctuary.

The feed stocks have improved and now the killer whales by the dozens are back.

What a venue for the tourist industry! What an opportunity for scientific research!

Gravel pits are not what we should support in Howe Sound. Go somewhere else please.

Brianna - Vancouver Island, British Columbia

I do not agree with this project as I wish to protect the beautiful environment which means a lot to me and many other people. There is no need to destroy a perfect natural area which is priceless and means more than anything ever could.

Gord Broughton - Mill Bay, British Columbia

To destroy the mouth of McNab Creek would be a very foolish thing to do. The fish and wildlife would be gone. An entire ecosystem destroyed.

Christina Halldorson - Howe Sound, British Columbia

I came to Howe Sound in 1985. The most beautiful place I'd ever seen. I still live in Howe Sound today and spend a great deal of time boating there. My vision for Howe sound has always been residential development and to eliminate industrial development. Eco- tourism and sharing this wonderful spot with the world has always been my vision for this area. A great deal of funds has been spent on developing a new sea to sky highway which has made the area much safer to access. Wildlife has returned after much funds was spent on the Britannia Mine clean up. Why on gods green earth would anyone with any conscience would so to speak " pave paradise and put up a parking lot " you don't know what you've got till it's gone!

The residential population of Howe Sound are the protectors and keepers of the Sound.

Governmental authorities should listen to the residents. Burnco can easily get gravel elsewhere. The crushing of gravel in this area is unthinkable.

Image

Personal Information Withheld - Sunshine Coast, British Columbia

BURNCO Rock Products wants to dig a 74+ acre pit, create an onsite crushing and processing plant, producing 20+ million tonnes of aggregate over 16 + years. The project will create only 12 direct operational jobs and threaten a productive estuary.

Have we not learned from the gravel pit horror stories throughout BC & their owner's lack of responsibility for damaging our ecosystems, polluting the environment & riding rough shod over the area citizens request for accountability & stewardship? Why would we even consider such a project? As for the environmental assessment, I would hope that all the BC gravel pit problems & history will also be seriously examined. Existing legislation has not been changed for years, consequently there is very little accountability for environmental damage.

Marcus Culver - Whistler, British Columbia

Please don't build a gravel pit in Howe Sound!!

Thank you.

Robert (Robb) & Bonny Schultz - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Howe Sound is again becoming rich with returning sea life species such as Anchovy, Herring, Chinook Salmon, Bottom fish, Porpoises, Orca, Humpback Whales and Seals.

Also bird life including bald eagles, hawks, sea gulls, geese and ducks are feeding on this balance. BC Spotted Prawns and Dungeness Crab are also here now but for how long, will it last if this projext proceeds? Stop Howe Sound Re-Industrialization immediately.

Wonderful to witness this regeneration over the past 45 years that we have lived here, as full time residents. Howe Sound polluters like Brittania Beach Copper Mine, Woodfibre Pulp Mill, FMC Chemical Plant for Pulp Mills are examples of the industrialization that gradually wiped-out the fish/sea life habitats in this region. Over the past nearly 50 years these waters have slowly been detoxified and cleaned-up. These polluting industries have shut down and there is still a long way to go. We must potect and save our Sound, not mess it up again.

Do not allow them to re-industrialize Howe Sound! It has much stronger tourism values for the BC and international markets with Whistler Blackcomb being North America's #1 Ski destination and the obvious success of the new Squamish Gondola Project.
Tourism is in our short and long term future while Burnco Aggregate Mining operating here is totally unacceptable to me.

Just look at it and you'll see. Where is the Sun Derby winning run of huge Tyee Salmon that were caught year after year at McNabb Creek in the past? There is no place here for this Aggrefate proposal, anywhere near McNabb Creek.

Burnco Agregate Project must not be considered for Howe Sound. What will it do to improve our marine species and Tourism described above? What is its environmental benefit to Howe Sound? What limits, if any, have been placed on the size of this agregate mining and marine transportation project?

Count us permanentlly opposed to this gravel and sand exploitation project in Howe Sound.

September 6, 2015

Karen Gerber - North Vancouver, British Columbia

This is the worst possible development proposal and must not proceed. Think of the next 16 years this project will run; during a doubling of the population in Greater Vancouver and surrounding of Howe Sound, with the accompanying demand for the precious magnificent recreational use of the Sound next door. Think of the precious sea life, the last pristine valley with its salmon, bears, cougar and elk. Think, think, think.

All for a lousy 12 jobs???

Brent O'Malley - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Howe Sound is just now recovering from decades of industrial abuse through most of the 20th century. Allowing a gravel mining operation will turn back a decade of rebirth that the Sound has been enjoying! Tourism brings more money into the local economy than this project ever will. This project must be stopped.

Personal Information Withheld - Coquitlam, British Columbia

As a Burrard Yacht Club member, the club is speaking for the membership without permission. I support this project as does my husband.

September 5, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

I 100% support this industry on our water. We need the gravel if we continue to want to add development in our communities. Perfectly suited location. Please do not let the "privileged individuals of Bowen and Bower Islands" to speak for us who support industry and jobs. One of the "summer" islanders actually posted that Industry and marine traffic would "spoil their views from their deck." There will be high paying jobs and years of employment. Thank you.

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

The killer is the fine particles of dust you cannot see. The mining and crushing of gravel creates and releases fine particulate matter called Crystalline Silica into the air which will be carried by the wind towards homes and schools.

These dangerous particles will cover the ocean, permeate homes, neighborhood parks, schools, and playgrounds.

Adults and vulnerable children and seniors will be exposed to this harmful carcinogen every day, all day.

Why the EA would CHOOSE to allow the creation of a toxic environment for our neighborhoods and these neighborhood schools when they do, in fact, have authority?

The EA needs to use their authority to deny the permit in order to protect public health, safety, economic development, and quality of life is inexcusable, incomprehensible, and UNACCEPTABLE.

So what's wrong with Crystalline Silica?

Crystalline Silica, a known carcinogen (cancer causing agent) which has been found to cause lung cancer, silicosis, and other health hazards!

SOME FACTS:

Some of the Crystalline Silica can be of the most dangerous variety with a designation as a PM2.5 particle. T hose are particles that measure less than 2.5 micro meters in size Once these tiny particles enter the lung they stay there. The body's natural defense encapsulates them causing permanent lung damage or cancer.

Winds can carry these fine particles over great distances.

The closer you are to the source, the higher the concentration and danger Health effects can range from Silicosis, lung cancer, tuberculosis increased lung irritation There is no cure for silicosis Once these fine particles enter the lungs, the body has no means to expel them Crystalline Silica clings to inanimate objects like homes, outdoor and playground equipment, trees, plants, and grass, so you and your families will come into contact with it.

Crystalline Silica will infiltrate home and schools' heating and cooling system and there is no viable way to stop it or mitigate it.

The dust is cumulative; each day over the 16 or more years the pit is in operation more and more of this hazardous dust will accumulate inside and around the ocean, homes and the schools.

Anything that sits downwind of the proposed pit and its loading and hauling facilities will be impacted. Most days of the year the wind speed exceeds 15 mph and is often much, much higher in our neighborhoods.

Why put a Gravel Pit / mining operation that creates a known carcinogen (cancer-causing) right next to a salmon bearing stream, our homes?

Below are some links and excerpts from articles that address this serious hazard.

http://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/data_General_Facts/crystalline-factsheet.pdf

What is crystalline silica?

Crystalline silica is a basic component of soil, sand, granite, and many other minerals.

Quartz is the most common form of crystalline silica. And we are NOT talking countertop grade.

Cristobalite and tridymite are two other forms of crystalline silica. All three forms may become respirable size fine particles when workers chip, cut, drill, or grind objects that contain crystalline silica.

What are the hazards of crystalline silica?

Silica exposure remains a serious threat to nearly 2 million U.S. workers, including more than 100,000 workers in high risk jobs such as abrasive blasting, foundry work, stonecutting, rock drilling, quarry work and tunneling. The seriousness of the health hazards associated with silica exposure is demonstrated by the fatalities and disabling illnesses that continue to occur in sandblasters and rockdrillers. Crystalline silica has been classified as a human lung carcinogen. Additionally, breathing crystalline silica dust can cause silicosis, which in severe cases can be disabling, or even fatal. The respirable silica dust enters the lungs and causes the formation of scar tissue, thus reducing the lungs' ability to take in oxygen. There is no cure for silicosis. Since silicosis affects lung function, it makes one more susceptible to lung infections like tuberculosis.

http://www.airinfonow.com/html/ed_particulate.html

Particles can come in almost any shape or size, and can be solid particles or liquid droplets. We divide particles into two major groups. These groups differ in many ways. One of the differences is size, we call the bigger particles PM10 and we call the smaller particles PM2.5.

BIG. The big particles are between 2.5 and 10 micrometers (from about 25 to 100 times thinner than a human hair). These particles are called PM10 (we say "P M ten", which stands for Particulate Matter up to 10 micrometers in size). These particles cause less severe health effects.

SMALL. The small particles are smaller than 2.5 micrometers (100 times thinner than a human hair).

These particles are called PM2.5 (we say "P M two point five", as in Particulate Matter up to 2.5 micrometers in size).

The smaller particles are lighter and they stay in the air longer and travel farther. PM10 (big) particles can stay in the air for minutes or hours while PM2.5 (small) particles can stay in the air for days or weeks.

And travel?

PM10 particles can travel as little as a hundred yards or as much as 30 miles.

PM2.5 particles go even farther; many hundreds of miles.

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Fine particles from gravel extraction cause cancer. Wind in the sound is constant and will be blown all over the place. For the health of everyone, please do not allow this mine to move forward.

There has been much research done that tells us that dust from gravel operations can cause health problems. People that have existing lung conditions or other health problems can be impacted largely by dust but overall long-term exposure for anyone is not good. And Burnco will operate every day for 16+ years.

There effects will be great from having a permanent operation in the vicinity.

Dust is made up of tiny, solid particles (particulate matter) floating in the air. Dust that is generated and released into the air as a direct result of human activity is known as "fugitive" particulate emissions, meaning that it has escaped from its place of origin. Dust blowing from gravel pits, mines or construction sites are all indications that a fugitive dust issue may exist. People should be concerned about this dust because of the problems it can create including death.

Exposure to particles can lead to a variety of serious health effects. Coarse particles (such as those found stirred up in the wind blown dust) and fine particles (such as those found in haze) pose the greatest problems because they can get deep into the lungs. Scientific studies have linked particle pollution exposure to a variety of health problems including: decreased lung function, development of chronic bronchitis, increased respiratory symptoms, heartbeat irregularities and heart attacks, just to name a few.

Residents living in the vicinity of a gravel pit or similar operation are at greatest risk for this type of exposure, not to mention all other living creatures that have had absolutely no say in the acts of civilization.

In medical literature, the term for this type of disease is called silicosis and it needs to be dealt with on an individual constitutional level.

The main thing to consider is the health of everyone and everything in the sound.

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

No social license!

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

What impact will the mine have the comeback of anchovy in the area? What research has Burnco performed on this aspect of their operation and the negative effects of the mine on anchovy?

http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/anchovy-schools-are-back-in-session-with-phenomenal-numbers-spawning-in-howe-sound

Jack Johnston - Kelowna, British Columbia

The approval process for this type of project takes ridiculously long. Imagine trying to build the Trans Canada Highway or the transcontinental railroad now. Impossible, it would never get done!

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

More studies and consideration needs to be done of the cumulative effects of all the industries - the run of river project alone is overload for this area.

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

A large scale gravel mine continues to press forward at McNab Creek, smack in the middle of the Sound.

This is the worst idea ever. Why would this be approved despite the risks and low job creation. Not worthy of the destruction of the land and risk to estuaries. Please consider the harm to the environment and do not allow this application to proceed.

September 3, 2016

Robert Thompson - North Vancouver, British Columbia

I'm not against pipelines, LNG, logging or most recourse extraction that creates wealth for our province. I'm not even against gravel extraction. This one, however, is proposed for what is the only pristine valley along steep Howe Sound. This is an area of recreational escape from the big city. This is not the right place for the destruction, dust, noise and lights produced extracting gravel. Surely there are more suitable locations farther away from vacation homes, water skiing, boating, hunting, fishing and the such. We have an entire province to extract resources. Doing it in the city's playground simply does not serve today's or future citizens very well.

Lisa Falconer - Vancouver, British Columbia

Over the past 3 years we have personally seen the growing improvement and return of marine life in Howe Sound. We have enjoyed many dolphin sitings, and have seen Orcas crusing past McNabb Creek during the last 3 summers. As recreational boaters in Howe Sound, we harvest prawns and crabs just off the point of the proposed Burnco gravel operation. Careful stewardship of this remarkable area has kept prawn, crab and fish stocks healthy in Howe Sound--restriction of industry and one can assume, the health of the water has brought back whales and dolphins. Slowly but surely--it has been improved. And now we are proposing to throw all that away?

I feel that we have been given a second chance to preserve the health and beauty of Howe Sound. I think it would be criminal to endanger it with increased industrial facilities such as the Burnco project.

The noise will impinge on the ability of recreational visitors to enjoy being in proximity to the operation. Barges and hi-speed water taxi traffic will scare away the orcas and dolphins. In addition, the wake produced by these vessels damage established docks across from McNabb and erode shoreline.

The area near McNabb creek is also one of the last safe anchorages for boaters in Howe Sound, and the Burnco operation will block access to the land.

Allowing this kind of destructive and disruption operation does not respect the investments made by various stakeholder groups in the Howe Sound area--effectively destroying the value of their landholdings and recreational organizations. An example of that is the Thunderbird Yacht Club which purchased their land--directly across from McNabb Creek and the Burrard Yacht Club as well. These two groups bought their land many years ago and have been conscientious occupants, respectful of the land and marine resources they enjoy. Is there no protection for quiet enjoyment of property? We are members of TBYC and I can tell you that we agonize about cutting down a single tree. The Burnco proposal makes our care to preserve the natural beauty of our area seem like a joke.

I haven't addressed the claims of creating jobs as those claims (12 jobs?) just don't "hold water" compared to the preservation of an amazing recreational gem that is so close to the city.

September 2, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Galiano, British Columbia

I support the Burnco Aggregate Project because we need jobs and real economic activity to support the people of B.C. and Canada. The environmental risk is very low and manageable compared to the great economic benefits this project will produce.

Lisa - Seattle, Washington

I will not support a government that approves the Burnco mine in Squamish.

Peter Ryan - Vancouver, British Columbia

Enough development of our recovering natural development in the Howe Sound! In an age when progressive economies are becoming eco friendly BC is the opposite with greed in government steamrolling purely economic agendas. People in BC love their environment and are among healthiest on the planet. This project for a measly dozen jobs along with its impact on the now rebounding Howe Sound is not needed, it is an affront to all the hard work and sound effort which is restoring this vital waterway so close to our major population center! Stop this greed and insanity and keep the industrial blight and ugliness away from Vancouver which even now pushes the envelope what with heavy and increasing shipping through its ports! Enough is enough.

Doreen Gregson - Lions Bay, British Columbia

I am AGAINST the proposed gravel mine at McNab Creek!!! The recovery of Howe Sound and the ongoing use and enjoyment of this valuable resource, by all, should trump the application for a profit-making venture that will damage the local environment and eco-system!

Elise Roberts - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Howe Sound is a water that is in recovery with herring finally returning after a decade of absence. I do not support any industrial activity in this area, especially in a watershed zone. And for only 12 jobs it is not worth it. Please do not put private profit over the wishes of the many citizens and tourists who love these areas, one of the most spectacular area and naturally rich ecosystems in Canada.

September 1, 2016

Brigitta Shore - Lions Bay, British Columbia

This is such a terrible project, I can't believe you can consider it. McNab is one of three estuaries in Howe Sound, it births life and there is no one who believes that having an aggregate mine will not destroy this. We have already seen industrial destruction in Howe Sound, it took years and millions of tax dollars and volunteer groups to clean up and rebuild the health of the ocean. Tourism is flourishing in Howe Sound, it's on the Sea to Sky Corridor, the aorta to whistler, people come by boat, car, plane and ferry to swim, paddle, hike, camp and enjoy cabin and boating life in natural splendour with beautiful wild life in the ocean and on land. It's as valuable if not more so than Stanley Park, have the foresight and respect to protect this area from industry. BC residents will loose in the short term by not being able to enjoy the area or the ocean life that will be destroyed, our tourism will be hit, and in the long term the cleanup and destruction will again cost us more than you make in tax revenue and 12 local jobs. Don't do it please, the down side far outweighs the upside!

Attached is a picture of a bear at McNab dining on mussels for breakfast, 100 ft from our boat.

image

Eileen Mackenzie - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

this is too much destruction for too few jobs and shows a reckless lack of concern for our environment

Personal Information Withheld - Vancouver, British Columbia

Do not go ahead with this project. There is no plan for Howe Sound. Each proposed project is looked at in terms of taxes to BC and not in terms of liveable region, ANY consideration of the environment and wildlife, or any better options. There's also no explanation of why we need this. I understand aggregate is used for building AND how can we get this without messing with our fish, our waters, creating boat traffic where none was, ruining the environmental recovery that has started to happen. What problem are "We" trying to solve by allowing the Burnco project to go ahead? The short sighted approach with lack of cohesive and integrated thought or planning is unacceptable.

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

An environmentally destructive gravel pit that provides only around 12 jobs in one of the most spectacular fiords in the world on the doorstep of a world class city ? No! No! No!

Judy Osburn - Pasley Island, British Columbia

Howe Sound is a national treasure and should be protected from industry. I have lived in the Collingwood Channel area for over 60 years and have experienced the amazing change over the past 5 years with the return of sea life due to the closure of Brittania Mines and Port Mellon Paper. As we move forward the value of pristine waters will be of far more economic value than polluted dead waters.

Judy Osburn - Pasley Island, British Columbia

Howe Sound is a national treasure and should be protected from industry. I have lived in the Collingwood Channel area for over 60 years and have experienced the amazing change over the past 5 years with the return of sea life due to the closure of Brittania Mines and Port Mellon Paper. As we move forward the value of pristine waters will be of far more economic value than polluted dead waters.

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

Why would anyone want to wreck the most scenic and beautiful place on Earth?

You pay paradise when you put up a parking lot. You don't know what you've got til it's gone....

Burno, make it an ecological park and you will make money in spades and become the admiration of the world!

Richard G. Rawlins - Bowen Island, British Columbia

I would like to go on record as being opposed to further expansion of the Burnco gravel mine in Squamish. There is little evidence that the encroachment into Howe Sound will have any community benefit other than a few jobs. The revenue stream will not aid the community either. On the contrary, the proposed expansion will only further denigrate the pristine Howe Sound and Squamish area, which would be much more profitable to develop for tourism which would benefit everyone in the area and generate funds to protect and maintain this exception land. Squamish history as an industrial site for paper, mining, and proposed LNG tank farm, and now huge gravel pit, should be left in the past and the community should move forward into utilization and management of sustainable resources that reinforce what is so special bout Sea to Sky.

Gord Broughton - Mill Bay, British Columbia

Please don't allow this to happen, Howe Sound should be made into a marine park, for us and for future generations. As a past 12 year resident of Lions Bay, I feel this would be a travesty to see Howe Sound become an industrial zone again, especially after it has healed so well from us humans last mining made such a toxic mess.

August 31, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Keats Island, British Columbia

I am writing as a resident of Keats Island in Howe Sound, in close proximity to the proposed project area. This is an environmentally healthy area with biodiversity and marine life specific to the area that would be damaged by the Bunco site. The wildlife in this particular area would be subject to so much change that would in turn, impact the entire chain from micro to macro, meaning from the smallest organisms such as algae through the entire chain and up to the largest predators, whales that use this ecosystem. In addition, there is so much beauty and enjoyment to be had in this area by kayakers, swimmers and nature lovers that the increase in boat traffic and commercial transport for this facility would drastically reduce the quality of life in Howe Sound. I don't believe that the stakeholders in this region are in favour of such a project in this location. I am of the strong opinion that this project is not in the best interest of anyone nor in the best i nterest of wildlife and biodiversity in a critically acclaimed part of BC - this is a project that is solely for the benefit of the company and does not provide any meaningful jobs or long term sustainability to the area. Please do not let this project proceed.

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Time to save this magnificent fjord, now that wildlife is finally returning, after many years of displacement/disappearance caused by earlier disturbance/pollution.

Recent exciting sightings of orcas, dolphins, and increases of sealife.

We owe it to nature and Canada. How can you possibly ruin it again - perhaps forever?!!

Jason Del Vicario - Bowyer Island, British Columbia

I'm outraged we are considering re-destroying parts of Howe Sound in the name of economic development. Howe Sound is North America's southern most fjord and on the doorstep of Vancouver and Sea to Sky country which relies heavily on tourism for economic activity. Howe Sound is only JUST now seeing the return of herring and anchovy runs and as a result salmon and orcas. The Britannia Mine and pulp mill at Port Melon basically killed the sound for 5 decades. And for what?... Some gravel and 12 FT jobs. It just makes zero sense... Please have some foresight and stop this poor use of our beautiful sound!

Personal Information Withheld - Gibsons, British Columbia

I oppose a large scale gravel mine near the Howe Sound. We need to preserve our ecosystem and not subject it to the devastating effects of a gravel mine.

Denise McCracken - Furry Creek, British Columbia

Our Province must decide whether Howe Sound and its proximity to Whistler and Metro Vancouver should be protected as a corridor to the wilderness and a showcase for our commitment to Environmental protection or the antithesis of this by allowing Industry to recontaminate and destroy the fragile beauty the Sound Provides.

Once industry becomes established it only grows and more industry evades by precedent. Surely this corridor needs our protection !

Please think and protect this unique gift of Nature!

No industry in Howe Sound it is the perfect tourist corridor and deserves to be protected !

image

Tracey Dudley - North Vancouver, British Columbia

this is my disapproval for the Mcnab Creek gravel mine! This will have an extreme impact on our wildlife!

David Okell - Bowen Island, British Columbia

Howe Sound is more valuable as a recreational area, and home to an increasing population on the sea to sky corridor.

This proposed development will degrade the environment ,be visable from the famed seatosky hwy. And will devalue properties on Gambier and on the sea to sky corridor .

Gravel is obtainable elsewhere,to destroy this prstine environment is nothing less than the continuing rape of our environment by greedy corporations who are only concerned with profit to the detriment of Howe Sound. Shame on you for even considering this proposal

Denise Olson - Gibsons, British Columbia

I am definitively AGAINST the Burnco Aggregate proposal for Howe Sound.. It will set the entire Howe sound region (impacted by silt, ship traffic etc) decades back in beginning to be a healthy ecosystem.. We are just now seeing recovery from decades of environmental abuse by industry which left years ago. With salmon runs decreasing all over the province , it is incumbent Apon us all to recognize and acknowledge that this area is essential to preservation and cannot be compromised by this for profit business .

August 30, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

What would it take to make LIFE SO UNBEARABLE THAT you move from YOUR HOME??

  1. to lose all your friends?
  2. to lose your sense of community?
  3. to be displaced after 20 years?
  4. to lose your property value?
  5. to compromise your and your family's health and well-being?

What would it take to have YOU move from YOUR home?

This is an ethical conundrum one would hope that the proponents would consider the ethics of displacing families and communities for profit.

August 29, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Has advertising Canada reviewed the claims made by Burnco? Truth matters.

August 28, 2016

Richard Zimmer - Garibaldi Highlands, British Columbia

I recently purchased property on Gambier island to show my family the beauty of the ocean and mountains. We look directly at the proposed burnco gravel pit. However sound has just recently recovered from years of pollution. I can't believe that the BC government would risk this beautiful area for a few dollars of tax revenue. I would rather you raise my taxes. The mine will disrupt the enjoyment of all owners in the area as well as tourism which I see constantly on the sound. Please deny their application.

August 24, 2016

Dr. Hugh Freeman - Bowen Island, British Columbia

A gravel mine? I thought we were done with this nonsense. A pod of killer whales just passed, perhaps 20-25. Looking for salmon and anchovies.

A gravel mine will prove to be destructive to the Howe Sound environment.

Short comment registering my opposition.

August 23, 2016

Dave Gauley - Squamish, British Columbia

Howe sound is just recovering from decades of industry. It is a beautiful place, and the mouth of mcnab creek is a place boaters enjoy for its calm waters. I oppose the mine project as short sighted when weighed against the impacts it will have on the sound.

David Crowther - Squamish, British Columbia

I am against this gravel pit operation because it will damage Howe Sound's water quality with silt and suspended fine particles in the water.

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Would like to see Burnco use clear language in their documents - not tentative wording. I.e. "not likely" to operate noise, lighting 24/7 is not reassuring at all. The sort of tentative wording leaves room to operate at full capacity despite the complaints from those who reside in Howe Sound.

August 22, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

How can Burnco say there will be no adverse effects on public health and noise? They claim in their proposal that these effects are insignificant. How did they study the adverse psychological impacts of a mine? What references did they use and was their research balanced (meaning they looked at the negative findings) on all the issues because to make grand claims to dismiss the public concerns is not legitimate research.

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

How will the proposed mine affect the domino effect of the the mass sea star die-off and the killing of other species?

http://www.ctvnews.ca/sci-tech/mass-die-off-of-sea-stars-in-b-c-s-howe-sound-reveals-ecological-shift-1.2957048

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

How will the anchovy be adversely affected?

http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/anchovy-schools-are-back-in-session-with-phenomenal-numbers-spawning-in-howe-sound

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

What will happen to the other gravel suppliers in Vancouver? Why do we need a competitor gravel pit?

This project is unnecessary - if we need more gravel, expand the ones that are already in existence.

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

Burnco's proposal does not adequately address the concerns raised about elk, grizzly bear, wolves, and other endangered species that will be adversely affected by this mine. They are saying the negative impact is "not significant". That is ridiculous, as anyone with a basic understanding of wildlife will know that the impact will be hugely significant. More independent studies need to be conducted. Also, just adding another waterway is not the same as the one that is intact and has been for several years. You can't snap your fingers and create an old-growth forest, can you? The same applies to the estuary that functions in it's own way. Don't mess with it!

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Once the buyers of gravel in Vancouver understand that the purchase of Burnco gravel is a contribution to the devastation of McNab Creek estuary, they will not buy it. Burnco will be boycotted. And all of this will be a big waste.

August 20, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

Pictures/photos on the Burnco website and on their advertising are deceiving the public. Please check that all the pictures used in their promotions are accurate depictions of what destruction can be expected from this mine - not just the "happy, glossy images" they use to sell this project. They have green-washed everything, including the language they use to describe their project. This sort of manipulation is inappropriate to convince the public to destroy an estuary (by the way, why don't they use this word?).

They state that "The Project has been designed based on areas that have been previously cleared, and on detailed groundwater, fisheries and surface water modelling." This is again misleading, as the estuary has has a couple of decades to resume its natural state. As well, we drove by in our boat a few years ago and took pictures of them digging up the foreshore - they blamed the loggers but it was to access their property. They are ruthless and don't seem concerned about the public's disinterest in seeing this project move ahead (see all the previous outpouring of negative public comments).

image

Personal Information Withheld- Lions Bay, British Columbia

absolutely oppose this in such a gorgeous part of the world. Find another location that will not adverseley affect the way of life for people and ocean life

August 19, 2016

Ingrid Wray - Lions Bay, British Columbia

I am opposed to this project for many reasons including the following:

Foremost, is the proposed reintroduction of industry into Howe Sound on an random basis with no overall management plan for this precious corridor of BC. There has been a slow recovery of the Sound from years of unchecked pollution from Woodfibre, Port Mellon and Britannia mines which resulted in closing the prawn and crab fishing for many years . Herring disappeared and salmon stopped returning to the steams. Hundreds of millions of tax payers dollars later and finally enforcement of laws regulating the companies ,the area is now showing signs of recovery. If sea life are once again to be under threat, and we are talking of a gravel mine in an estuary who knows if they can ever recover .The Cohen report on the state of the wild salmon stocks and the decline of returning salmon in the Fraser river is a red flag that all our salmon needs to be protected .

I think there should be a moratorium on any new industries until the cumulative effects can be ascertained. Have we learned nothing from the past mistakes ? Even with mitigation strategies in place the enforcement often comes too little too late , Mount Polley comes to mind.

Howe Sound and a river estuary is the wrong place for a gravel mine and the risk of adversely affecting the wildlife habitat too great.

August 18, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - North Vancouver, British Columbia

Stop the industrialization of Howe Sound. Allow the ecosystem to remain intact. Do not allow the project to process.

Personal Information Withheld - Abbotsford, British Columbia

Concern for the wildlife and environment. Especially the wolf population.

Personal Information Withheld - Edmonton, Alberta

I was unable to read BurnCo's Application for Environmental Assessment because the URL could not be found so I am not able to comment on that directly. I can say however that it is my understanding that this project will mine over one million tons of sand and gravel from an ecologically sensitive area that includes McNab Creek, a Pacific salmon spawning area. It is also an area that has only recently begun to recover from being a critically endangered ecosystem, and only in recent years has marine life such as whales, dolphins, salmon, herring, crabs, and prawns returned to the inlet.

It is also under threat from a number of industrial and developmental projects including not only the Burnco Aggregate Mine, but also the Woodfibre LNG project, an industrial waste treatment plant proposal, a ski resort, and housing developments for an additional 10,000 people. This is amidst a lack of a single comprehensive management plan for Howe Sound. This is a problem and the barrage of project proposals that seem to largely go unchallenged is indicative of a system that does not properly assess the environmental impact of these projects singularly or in conjunction with one another.

There is also the question of what right private companies have to exploit a wilderness area for profit. The promise of jobs does not outweigh the almost certain destruction of many aspects of this still recovering ecosystem. We are talking about building a gravel pit on a landscape endowed with some of the most stunning natural scenery in the world, albeit one that still carries scars from an industrially exploitative past. Creating a provincial recreation area in lieu of industrial development would not only preserve the land, it would draw visitors from around the globe as well as provide a place for people in nearby Metro Vancouver to visit and experience nature. This surely would create jobs and a thriving local economy.

Yet there is no profit in that suggestion and that alone should be reason enough to disagree with this proposal. Is there any mention in the environmental assessment of the fact that Burnco donates money to the B.C. Liberals?

The last of British Columbia's natural habitats are under siege. With controversies surrounding such topics as the grizzly bear trophy hunt and the government running down packs of wolves to shoot them from helicopters, there is truly a need for more oversight into projects that threaten some of the last remaining ecosystems that have managed to breathe amidst aggressive, for-profit development.

Should a private company be able to go into somewhere like Howe Sound and turn it into a gravel pit? Who truly benefits from this? I think we all know the answer to that.

You might use the argument that I live in Alberta and so this doesn't affect me. Well, Burnco originates in Alberta so why should I have less say about this than they do?

As someone who visits B.C. regularly I can see clearly that its most precious resources lie in its amazing landscapes and abundant wildlife. We don't need to wait until it's too late to protect the things that are worth far more than money, and that will undoubtedly define our legacy for future generations.

Shira Moir-Smith - Langley, British Columbia

Please leave this area alone! We need wild spaces to survive as well, psychologically, we need to know they're there, that animals roam freely, and the world is not all about profit and greed and destruction.

Personal Information Withheld - Abbotsford, British Columbia

As a resident of Whistler from 84'-98' in saddened by the continued loss of wildlife habitat. Soon Wolves will be on the I stiff list if we don't protect them for future generations. Please no gravel pit.

August 17, 2016

Annie - Sechelt, British Columbia

After experiencing firsthand how municipal, provincial and federal government ignore requests by the public to monitor contravention of the permit by the Lehigh sand and gravel pit mine in Sechelt, the Burnco application is another affront to the sensibilities of those who enjoy BC's landscape. History has shown that once a mine permit is issued, the responsible ministerial department does little to monitor the site.

The area under application by Burnco is pristine wilderness that stands to be permanently marred by the development of an aggregate mine. The presence of industry in such a remote place would threaten both wildlife and tourism, especially those who seek the silence of nature.

If Lehigh Heidelberg has not set the precedent of a good neighbour to the citizens of Sechelt, is there reason to believe that Burnco would be any different? Any potentially huge taxes paid by Burnco do not justify ignoring the public's interests.

We want the SCRD to listen more closely this time: those of us who call the Sunshine Coast home don't want more scarred landscapes in the name of "development," more noise and dust pollution, and more destruction of beautiful wilderness, especially by multi-million dollar corporations. Whose country is this really?

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

It is difficult to justify the need for this proposed mine. There are already other existing gravel mines in the area that service the Vancouver area. Please independently look into whether or not this aggregate is truly needed as the benefit does not validate the destruction of a salmon-bearing estuary. 12 jobs is not worth it to disrupt a wildlife area (elk, grizzly, wolves, and plenty of at-risk species).

Personal Information Withheld - Howe Sound, British Columbia

I wonder how it is that Burnco gets years to figure out its strategy and the public only gets a couple of weeks to review all of the information and critique it in a meaningful way? This is a skewed process in favour of the proponents. The only way to fix this is to postpone the EA process and allow the public a fair review.

Personal Information Withheld - Lions Bay, British Columbia

With sports fishing cancelled on the salmon this year, it would be irresponsible to allow this project to move forward. I call on DFO to STOP this destructive project before we loose everything.

http://vancouversun.com/business/local-business/dfo-shutting-down-all-salmon-sports-fishing-on-lower-fraser-to-protect-sockeye

August 16, 2016

Personal Information Withheld - Squamish, British Columbia

Howe Sound is a place of rare beauty. People from all over the world come to feast in it's sights, especially on their way to Whistler, voted the best ski mountain in the world 5 years running.

This gravel pit will turn pristine beauty into an ugly industrial site. Surely gravel can come from elsewhere.

Long ago the area of Stanley Park became a protected park space inspite of it's potential for development and the city and province is forever grateful now for that wonderful decision.

Please look to the future. Make Howe Sound a protected place where millions of people can enjoy and learn from this beautiful place.